Movies Set In The 50s

Updated
Movies Set In The 50s

Have you heard these Movies Set In The 50s? We promise you'll find some new picks. Here are 25 of the top ones.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

The Shawshank Redemption
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton, William Sadler
Rated R

The Shawshank Redemption is a 1994 American drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont, based on the 1982 Stephen King novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. The film stars Tim Robbins as Andrew "Andy" Dufresne, a banker who is sentenced to life in Shawshank State Penitentiary for the murder of his wife and her lover, despite his claims of innocence. Over the following two decades, he befriends a fellow prisoner, Ellis "Red" Redding, and finds himself protected by the guards after the warden begins using him in his money-laundering operation. Ultimately, Andy orchestrates a daring escape and Red, after being granted parole, reunites with him in Mexico. The film has been acclaimed by audiences and critics alike and is often considered one of the greatest films of all time. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Robbins), and Best Adapted Screenplay (Darabont). The film was also a commercial success, grossing $28.3 million worldwide.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather is an American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and based on Mario Puzo's novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the patriarch and heir apparent of the powerful Italian-American crime family, the Corleone family. The story follows the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone, focusing on the transformation of his son Michael Corleone from reluctant family outsider to ruthless Mafia boss. The family is also threatened by rival gangsters and powerful figures, placing them in the center of a series of violent events. The film received widespread critical acclaim and is widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. It is the highest-grossing film of 1972 and was for a time the highest-grossing film ever made. It won the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather Part II is the 1974 sequel to the critically acclaimed 1972 film The Godfather. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola, the film follows the Corleone family as they move to the Nevada desert and expand their criminal empire, while also chronicling the early life of a young Vito Corleone. The film follows the attempts of Michael Corleone, the new head of the family, to retain power while dealing with internal and external forces that challenge his authority. Along the way, he must confront his own demons and the consequences of his actions. The Godfather Part II is widely considered to be one of the greatest films of all time and was the first sequel to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 comedy-drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Tom Hanks. It tells the story of an everyman, Forrest Gump (Hanks), who despite his sub-average intelligence, manages to lead an extraordinary life. During his life, Forrest meets and interacts with a range of iconic figures from the latter half of the 20th century, including Presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard Nixon, and participates in many of the signature events of the period. All the while, Forrest's love for his childhood sweetheart, Jenny Curran, is the one constant throughout his life. The film won the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Actor (Hanks) and Best Director (Zemeckis).

Goodfellas (1990)

Goodfellas
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci, Lorraine Bracco
Rated R

Goodfellas is a 1990 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and based on the non-fiction book "Wiseguy" by Nicholas Pileggi. It follows the rise and fall of three gangsters, Henry Hill (Ray Liotta), Jimmy Conway (Robert De Niro) and Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci), in the 1950s and 1960s. The film focuses on their adventures in organized crime, including drug dealing, loan sharking, and murder, as they become increasingly involved in the Mafia. The film also stars Lorraine Bracco as Henry's wife, Karen Hill. The film was a critical and commercial success, receiving six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, and won one for Best Supporting Actor (Pesci).

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a classic horror/thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1960. It follows the story of a young woman, Marion Crane, who steals $40,000 from her employer and goes on the run, eventually checking into the secluded Bates Motel. The motel is managed by the young and eccentric Norman Bates and his possessive mother. As the story develops, their secrets and dark past come to light and Marion finds herself in a terrifying situation. Psycho is widely considered one of Hitchcock's best films, and is one of the earliest and most influential entries in the slasher genre.

Back to the Future (1985)

Back to the Future
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Crispin Glover
Rated PG

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science fiction adventure film directed by Robert Zemeckis. The film follows Marty McFly, a high school student, as he is accidentally sent back in time to 1955 in a time-traveling DeLorean designed by mad scientist Doc Brown. With the help of Doc, Marty must find a way to return to his time while also trying to fix his parents' troubled relationship before he is erased from existence. Along the way, Marty encounters his parents as teenagers, endangers his future existence, and meets the eccentric scientist, Dr. Emmett Brown. The film features a classic 1980s soundtrack and iconic moments such as the DeLorean reaching 88 miles per hour and flying off into the sky. The film was an instant classic, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985 and winning an Academy Award for Best Sound Effects Editing.

To Live (1994)

To Live
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Yimou Zhang, starring You Ge, Gong Li, Ben Niu, Wu Jiang
Rated Not Rated

"To Live" is a Chinese film directed by Yimou Zhang in 1994 and is based on a novel by Yu Hua. It follows the story of Xu Fugui and his family throughout the tumultuous years of Chinese history from the 1940s to the 1970s. The film follows the struggles of the family, including Xu Fugui's gambling addiction and the resulting poverty experienced by his family. The family also faces the various political changes that occurred in China during this time, including the civil war and the Cultural Revolution. Through it all, Xu Fugui and his wife, Jiazhen, strive to maintain a sense of hope and optimism, and to persevere despite the difficulties they face. The film ultimately serves as a reflection on the strength and resilience of the human spirit, and the power of love and loyalty in the face of adversity.

Raging Bull (1980)

Raging Bull
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, Frank Vincent
Rated R

Raging Bull is a biographical drama directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Jake LaMotta. The film is about the life of Italian-American boxer Jake LaMotta, played by Robert De Niro. It follows LaMotta's career from the 1940s to the 1950s and his struggle to overcome personal demons and become a champion. As LaMotta's boxing career is declining, his jealous and violent behavior outside of the ring increases. He has a turbulent relationship with his brother Joey (Joe Pesci), and his marriage to Vickie (Cathy Moriarty) is strained by his excessive jealousy. LaMotta eventually turns to alcohol and gambling, leading to ruin and his eventual self-realization. Through LaMotta's story, Scorsese paints a portrait of a man whose ambition is derailed by his own destructive impulses. The film is considered one of the greatest ever made and won the Academy Award for Best Actor (De Niro) and Best Editing.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical drama film directed by Ron Howard and written by Akiva Goldsman. Based on the life of John Nash, the film stars Russell Crowe as Nash, along with Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bettany, Adam Goldberg, Judd Hirsch, and Christopher Plummer in supporting roles. The film tells the story of Nash, an arduous yet brilliant mathematician, as he struggles with paranoid schizophrenia and his consequent isolation from society. As Nash overcomes his struggles and is eventually honored with the Nobel Prize, the film also explores his relationships with his wife Alicia, with his best friend Charles, and with his students. The film was both a critical and commercial success, earning eight Academy Award nominations and winning four, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Supporting Actress for Connelly.

L.A. Confidential (1997)

L.A. Confidential
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Curtis Hanson, starring Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger
Rated R

L.A. Confidential is a neo-noir crime film directed by Curtis Hanson and released in 1997. Set in the 1950s, the film focuses on the lives of three Los Angeles police officers, each with their own motivations and goals. It follows their struggle to uncover the truth behind a series of brutal and mysterious murders, while also revealing the dark underbelly of the glamorous L.A. scene. Along the way, each of them must face their own personal demons, while navigating a web of corruption and deceit. The film stars Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger, Danny DeVito and James Cromwell.

Shutter Island (2010)

Shutter Island
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley
Rated R

Shutter Island is a psychological thriller directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio. The movie follows U.S. Marshall Teddy Daniels (DiCaprio) and his new partner, Chuck (Mark Ruffalo), as they investigate the disappearance of a patient from Shutter Island's Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane. As Teddy and Chuck travel to the isolated facility, they uncover a sinister plot involving a former Nazi doctor and a series of experiments conducted on the hospital’s most dangerous inmates. It soon becomes clear that Teddy is in over his head and that the island may hold a dark secret that could cost him his life. As their investigation deepens, Teddy is forced to confront his own troubled past and come to terms with the horrific truth of the island.

Bhaag Milkha Bhaag (2013)

Bhaag Milkha Bhaag
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, starring Farhan Akhtar, Japtej Singh, Divya Dutta, Pawan Malhotra
Rated Not Rated

Bhaag Milkha Bhaag is a 2013 Indian biographical sports film based on the life of Milkha Singh, an Indian athlete who was a national champion runner and an Olympian. Directed by Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra, the film stars Farhan Akhtar as Milkha Singh, with Pavan Malhotra and Divya Dutta in supporting roles. The story follows Milkha's life, starting with his childhood during the Partition of India in 1947, and his escape from the violence then. It follows his athletics career, and how he overcame his personal trauma and difficulties to become one of the greatest runners in India. It also focuses on his relationships with his coach, his family, and his love interest. The film was a critical and commercial success, and it won multiple awards, including the National Film Award for Best Popular Film Providing Wholesome Entertainment.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

The Battle of Algiers
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Samia Kerbash
Rated Not Rated

The Battle of Algiers is a classic Italian-Algerian historical war drama directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. Set in the 1950s, the film follows the events leading up to the Algerian War of Independence against French colonial rule. It depicts both sides of the conflict, showing the harsh repression of the French Army and the violence and terrorism of the Algerian nationalists. The story culminates in the three-day Battle of Algiers, where the Algerians, under the leadership of Ali La Pointe, fight for their freedom from the oppressive rule of France. Through its powerful depiction of the brutal reality of war, The Battle of Algiers has become an acclaimed and influential political drama.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles
Rated PG

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 American drama film directed by Peter Weir and written by Tom Schulman. Set in 1959 at the fictional elite conservative Vermont boarding school Welton Academy, it tells the story of an English teacher who inspires his students through his teaching of poetry. The film stars Robin Williams as John Keating, a charismatic English teacher who instructs his students to look at poetry with a different perspective of traditional values. The film also features an ensemble cast of young actors, including Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard, and Josh Charles. The story follows the students of the Welton Academy, who face enormous pressure from their parents and the school's administration to conform to traditional norms. Keating encourages them to pursue their passions, to make their lives meaningful, and to "make your lives extraordinary." This leads to a series of events that eventually result in a confrontation with the conservative administration. The film ends with the boys standing on their desks in a gesture of defiance against the administration, symbolizing the power of individuality and free thinking.

The Iron Giant (1999)

The Iron Giant
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Brad Bird, starring Eli Marienthal, Harry Connick Jr., Jennifer Aniston, Vin Diesel
Rated PG

The Iron Giant is a 1999 animated family film directed by Brad Bird. It follows a young boy, Hogarth Hughes, who discovers a giant robotic being, who he names the Iron Giant. Hogarth and the Iron Giant quickly become friends and embark on an adventure to save their town from a government agent, who is determined to destroy the Iron Giant. Along the way, Hogarth teaches the Iron Giant valuable lessons about life, friendship, and heroism. With the help of a beatnik artist, the Iron Giant becomes a true hero and saves the town, proving that even the most unlikely of friends can make a real difference in the world.

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

My Neighbor Totoro
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Hayao Miyazaki, starring Hitoshi Takagi, Noriko Hidaka, Chika Sakamoto, Shigesato Itoi
Rated G

My Neighbor Totoro is an animated fantasy film directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It tells the story of two young girls, Satsuki and Mei, who move to the countryside to be closer to their ailing mother while their father works away in Tokyo. While exploring their new home, the sisters discover a group of magical creatures living in the nearby forest, led by a giant, friendly creature named Totoro. With the help of Totoro and his friends, the girls explore the wonders of the countryside and help their mother recover. In the end, the girls come to terms with their mother's illness, learning to accept it and cherish the time they have together.

Stand by Me (1986)

Stand by Me
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Rob Reiner, starring Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell
Rated R

Stand by Me is a coming-of-age adventure drama directed by Rob Reiner and based on the novella The Body by Stephen King. It follows four pre-teen boys—Gordie, Chris, Teddy and Vern—as they embark on a journey to find the body of a missing boy. Along the way, the boys must contend with physical dangers, as well as their own internal struggles with growing up. As the boys bond, they confront their fears and learn the true meaning of friendship. The film features an all-star cast, including River Phoenix, Wil Wheaton, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell, and Kiefer Sutherland. Stand By Me is considered a classic coming-of-age film and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Last Picture Show (1971)

The Last Picture Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Bogdanovich, starring Timothy Bottoms, Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd, Ben Johnson
Rated R

The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich and based on the novel of the same name by Larry McMurtry. The film follows the story of a small town in Texas called Anarene, and the lives of two high school seniors, Sonny and Duane, who live there. Sonny and Duane have a close, but troubled friendship as they attempt to navigate the transition to adulthood. As the story unfolds, Anarene’s only source of entertainment, the movie theater, closes, signaling a change in the town and the end of an era. The characters must come to terms with the fact that their lives will never be the same, and face the harsh realities of growing up. The film is a bittersweet coming of age story that provides an intimate look at the lives of small town teenagers in the 1950s.

Big Fish (2003)

Big Fish
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tim Burton, starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange
Rated PG-13

Big Fish is a 2003 fantasy drama directed by Tim Burton and starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, and Helena Bonham Carter. The movie follows the story of Edward Bloom, an eccentric and larger-than-life storyteller played by Finney and later by McGregor, who regales his son Will with tales of his past adventures. As Will grows older, his relationship with his father becomes strained as he begins to doubt the truth of his father's stories. When Edward's health begins to decline, Will embarks on a journey to discover the truth behind his father's tall tales. Along the way, he meets a colorful cast of characters, from circus performers and witches to giants, mermaids, and werewolves. The film is an exploration of the power of stories to bring people together and to shape lives.

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War (2004)

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Je-kyu Kang, starring Jang Dong-Gun, Won Bin, Eun-ju Lee, Hyeong-jin Kong
Rated R

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War is a 2004 South Korean war drama film directed by Je-kyu Kang. The film follows two brothers, Jin-tae and Jin-seok Lee, who are forcibly recruited into the South Korean army during the beginning of the 1950–1953 Korean War. Jin-tae, the elder brother, is a brave and passionate fighter who will do anything to protect his brother. However, his reckless actions pit the brothers against each other on the battlefield, leading to a heartbreaking conclusion. The film follows the brothers as they struggle to survive and protect each other in the midst of the chaotic conflict. Through their story, the film explores the horrors of war and the powerful bond of brotherhood.

La dolce vita (1960)

La dolce vita
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Federico Fellini, starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimée, Yvonne Furneaux
Rated Not Rated

La Dolce Vita is a 1960 Italian comedy-drama directed by Federico Fellini. It follows Marcello Rubini, a journalist and socialite, as he navigates Rome's high-society nightlife and celebrity culture in search of a fulfilling life. Along the way, he meets a variety of characters, including the decadent and wealthy. Ultimately, he finds little satisfaction in the lifestyle, leading him to question the authenticity of life itself. The film's Italian title literally translates to "the sweet life," and it has become a classic of world cinema.

Edward Scissorhands (1990)

Edward Scissorhands
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tim Burton, starring Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest, Anthony Michael Hall
Rated PG-13

Edward Scissorhands is a fantasy romance film directed by Tim Burton and released in 1990. It stars Johnny Depp as the title character, Edward, an artificial man created by a reclusive inventor, played by Vincent Price. Edward is left with scissors for hands, which makes his life difficult and isolates him from the rest of society. However, his isolation is broken one day when a kind-hearted local Avon lady, Peg (Dianne West) discovers him and invites him to live with her family. Living with the Boggs family, he finds acceptance from them and the other townsfolk, and is accepted as a member of their community. However, the townsfolk's initial view of him as a harmless, naive young man is soon challenged when he begins to attract the wrong kind of attention and is blamed for a series of crimes. Edward is eventually forced to flee the town, but not before winning the hearts of the townspeople and Peg, who follows him away. The film ends with Edward living in the wilderness, alone but happy.

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

The Manchurian Candidate
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From John Frankenheimer, starring Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Janet Leigh, Angela Lansbury
Rated PG-13

The Manchurian Candidate (1962) is a political thriller directed by John Frankenheimer. The story follows Raymond Shaw, a decorated veteran of the Korean War who is brainwashed by communist forces while he is a prisoner of war. Upon returning home, Raymond is unknowingly controlled by communist agents and is put forward as a vice-presidential candidate. At the same time, Major Bennett Marco, a fellow soldier of Raymond's, begins to suspect a sinister plot and sets out to unravel it. With the help of Raymond's mother and Marco's superior officers, Marco works to uncover the truth and save Raymond from the communist forces. The Manchurian Candidate is a classic Cold War film that remains a timeless classic.

In Cold Blood (1967)

In Cold Blood
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Brooks, starring Robert Blake, Scott Wilson, John Forsythe, Paul Stewart
Rated R

In Cold Blood is a 1967 American crime drama directed by Richard Brooks and based on Truman Capote's nonfiction novel. The film tells the true story of the 1959 murder of four members of the Herbert Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas by two drifters, Richard Eugene Hickock and Perry Edward Smith. The film follows the two men as they plan and carry out the gruesome killings, and then as they separately try to evade capture and justice by the two detectives assigned to their case. With a combination of documentary and fictionalized scenes, the film captures the intense emotional and psychological toll of the crime on the family, the detectives, and the two killers.

 



Related Articles

Visitors also search for: Female Horror Movies About Cyber Security Movies About Hoodoo Movies About Vacations Top Movies Of 1964 Movies About Blind People Splatter Films