Movies About Awakening

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Movies About Awakening

Dozens of directors have reported on Movies About Awakening. Here are 25 of our favorites.

Schindler's List (1993)

Schindler's List
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, Caroline Goodall
Rated R

Schindler’s List is a 1993 American historical drama film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg and written by Steven Zaillian. The film is based on the novel Schindler’s Ark by Thomas Keneally, which is based on the real-life story of Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. The film follows Oskar Schindler’s rise from a greedy businessman to a humanitarian who risks his own life to protect his Jewish workers from persecution, and ultimately uses his wealth and connections to save them from the Nazi death camps. Through amazing performances by Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley, Ralph Fiennes and a powerful score by John Williams, the film is a powerful portrayal of the horrors of the Holocaust and the courage of those who survived it. The film won numerous awards, including seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

Inception (2010)

Inception
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Elliot Page, Ken Watanabe
Rated PG-13

Inception is a sci-fi thriller written and directed by Christopher Nolan. The film follows Dom Cobb, a thief with the ability to enter people’s dreams and steal their secrets. Cobb is hired by a mysterious businessman to plant an idea in the mind of a rival heir. To do so, he and his team of experts must create a dream within a dream and navigate a series of increasingly complex dream levels. Along the way, Cobb confronts his own personal demons and the blurred line between reality and dreams. The film is an exploration of the power of the human mind and the consequences of planting ideas in it.

Fight Club (1999)

Fight Club
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, Meat Loaf, Zach Grenier
Rated R

Fight Club is a 1999 film directed by David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton. The film follows an unnamed protagonist, suffering from insomnia and struggling with his growing disenchantment with consumer culture. He forms a "fight club" with soap maker Tyler Durden and they are joined by men who also want to fight recreationally. As the fight club grows, their actions become increasingly violent and extreme, leading to a conflict with a rival group. The protagonist ultimately uncovers a corporate conspiracy and has to confront his alternate personality, Tyler Durden, who is determined to bring down modern civilization. The film is a commentary on the psychological effects of consumer culture, as well as themes of masculinity and nihilism.

The Matrix (1999)

The Matrix
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving
Rated R

The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by the Wachowski siblings. The film follows computer hacker Neo (played by Keanu Reeves), who is drawn into the world of the Matrix, a simulated reality created by intelligent machines to keep humanity under control. Neo learns the truth about the Matrix and is given the choice of either accepting his fate as a prisoner, or join the fight against the machines and save humanity. He chooses the latter and is trained by Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) and Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) to become the "'One', a messianic figure who can end the war and free mankind from the Matrix". Along the way, Neo discovers the existence of powerful agents, rogue programs, and a power-hungry A.I. known as "The Architect". Ultimately, Neo must use his newfound skills to survive and to lead the fight against the machines.

Interstellar (2014)

Interstellar
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Mackenzie Foy
Rated PG-13

Interstellar is an epic science fiction film directed by Christopher Nolan. The story follows former NASA pilot Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) and a team of researchers as they set out on a journey through a newly discovered wormhole in order to find a new home for humanity. Along their journey, they encounter a variety of obstacles, including a hostile planet, a race of sentient robots, and a mysterious tesseract. With the fate of humanity in their hands, Cooper and the team must race against time to find a solution and save mankind. The film features stunning visuals, immersive sound design and a thought-provoking story that explores themes of love, loss and the power of human determination.

The Green Mile (1999)

The Green Mile
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt
Rated R

The Green Mile is a 1999 American drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont and based on Stephen King's 1996 novel of the same name. The film stars Tom Hanks as Paul Edgecomb and Michael Clarke Duncan as John Coffey, two prison guards on Death Row in the 1930s who develop a special bond with a condemned inmate, an African-American man convicted of rape and murder. As the relationship between the trio develops, Edgecomb witnesses Coffey’s miraculous healing powers and struggles with his own morality as he comes to terms with Coffey's innocence. The film is ultimately a story of hope, faith and redemption, and offers a powerful conclusion as it examines the power of love, justice and compassion.

Samsara (2011)

Samsara
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Ron Fricke, starring Balinese Tari Legong Dancers, Ni Made Megahadi Pratiwi, Puti Sri Candra Dewi, Putu Dinda Pratika
Rated PG-13

Samsara is a critically acclaimed, non-narrative documentary film directed by Ron Fricke. The film is a spiritual journey, taking the viewer on a visual exploration of the world, featuring footage taken in 25 countries over a period of five years. The film delves into themes of birth, death and rebirth, exploring how humanity is connected by the same universal experiences. The film contains no dialogue and is accompanied by a score of various world music, featuring both traditional and modern elements. Through its sweeping visuals, Samsara reveals the beauty, complexity and fragility of the planet, as well as our collective place within it.

Princess Mononoke (1997)

Princess Mononoke
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Hayao Miyazaki, starring Yôji Matsuda, Yuriko Ishida, Yûko Tanaka, Billy Crudup
Rated PG-13

Set in Japan during the Muromachi period, Princess Mononoke tells the story of Ashitaka, a prince from the Emishi people, who is cursed with a deadly affliction after being attacked by a giant boar-demon. He embarks on a journey to the west to find a cure for his curse and to discover the source of the corruption that is plaguing the land. Along the way he meets San, a mysterious girl raised by wolves, who is determined to protect the forest that is her home from the encroaching human forces. Ashitaka and San must join forces to battle both the humans and their own gods, as they search for a way to bring peace to the land.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 science fiction romantic comedy-drama film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Michel Gondry. The film follows a couple, Joel and Clementine, as they have each other erased from their memories. After undergoing the procedure, they both seek to re-establish their relationship with each other and come to terms with the memories of their past. The film stars Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet, with supporting performances from Kirsten Dunst, Elijah Wood, Mark Ruffalo, and Tom Wilkinson. It was nominated for four Academy Awards including Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress for Winslet, Best Director for Gondry, and Best Editing. The film is widely considered one of the best films of the 2000s and was placed on several "best of" lists.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 psychological drama film directed by Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, and Marlon Wayans. The film follows four characters in Brooklyn, New York, as they struggle with addiction and its effects on their lives. We meet Sara (Burstyn), an elderly widow struggling with depression and loneliness. She is prescribed a combination of amphetamines and sedatives, but quickly becomes dependant on them as her mental health deteriorates. Harry (Leto) is an aspiring entrepreneur who dreams of becoming a TV star. He and his best friend, Tyrone (Wayans), become addicted to heroin, eventually leading them to begin stealing to support their habit. Harry's girlfriend, Marion (Connelly), is an aspiring actress who is also struggling with her addiction. She goes to a modeling agency and is asked to do a pornographic film in order to make money and fuel her addiction. The film follows each character's journey as they descend into addiction and its consequences, eventually coming to a powerful conclusion.

The Truman Show (1998)

The Truman Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich
Rated PG

The Truman Show is a 1998 American satirical science fiction film directed by Peter Weir, written by Andrew Niccol, and starring Jim Carrey. The film tells the story of Truman Burbank, an ordinary man who slowly realizes his life is actually a 24-hour reality television show broadcast live around the world. Despite the fact that everyone he knows is in on the show, Truman struggles to escape from the fabricated environment, leading to an emotionally powerful finale. The film is a modern day allegory for the power of media, and was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Actor for Jim Carrey.

Shutter Island (2010)

Shutter Island
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley
Rated R

"Shutter Island", directed by Martin Scorsese and released in 2010, is a neo-noir psychological thriller set in 1954. US Marshal Teddy Daniels and his new partner, Chuck Aule, travel to Shutter Island to investigate the disappearance of a patient from the island's Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Once on the island, Teddy begins to suspect that he is actually a patient and not a Marshal, and that he is being manipulated by the doctors. He discovers a sinister plot going on at the hospital and is determined to uncover the truth. In the end Teddy's investigation leads him to a shocking realization about himself and the nature of the island.

V for Vendetta (2005)

V for Vendetta
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From James McTeigue, starring Hugo Weaving, Natalie Portman, Rupert Graves, Stephen Rea
Rated R

V for Vendetta is a 2005 dystopian political thriller film directed by James McTeigue and written by the Wachowski Brothers, based on the 1988 DC/Vertigo Comics limited series of the same name by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. The film follows a mysterious freedom fighter known as "V" (Hugo Weaving) who uses terrorist tactics to battle against an oppressive totalitarian regime in a near-future London. V takes the law into his own hands, rescuing a young woman named Evey (Natalie Portman) from an attempted rape by government agents and using her as a pawn in his plan to bring freedom and justice to the people of England. V's quest ultimately leads to a revolution in which he and his allies overthrow the regime, though at a great cost. The film is a message of hope and inspiration, showing that one person can make a difference and that even in the darkest of times, hope can be found.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 biographical drama film directed by Ron Howard and written by Akiva Goldsman. It is based on the life of John Nash, a Nobel Laureate in Economics. The film stars Russell Crowe as John Nash, with Jennifer Connelly, Ed Harris, and Paul Bettany in supporting roles. The story follows the life of John Nash, a mathematical genius, as he develops paranoid schizophrenia and struggles to overcome the illness. While attending Princeton University, Nash begins to develop a number of revolutionary theories in game theory, alienating him from his friends, family and colleagues. After a series of hospitalizations and several failed attempts to control his illness, Nash is able to slowly rebuild his life and marriage with the help of his wife, Alicia. As Nash tries to make sense of his illness and his own life, he gradually learns to manage his illness with the help of his family and friends. Ultimately, Nash is able to find solace in his work and receive the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1994. The film has won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Sixth Sense (1999)

The Sixth Sense
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From M. Night Shyamalan, starring Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment, Toni Collette, Olivia Williams
Rated PG-13

The Sixth Sense is a supernatural thriller film written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan. It follows the story of a child psychologist, Dr. Malcolm Crowe (Bruce Willis), who is assigned to help a troubled young boy, Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment), who claims to be able to see and communicate with dead people. As the story progresses, it is revealed that Cole is not the only one who has this strange ability. Crowe finds himself thrown into a dangerous and mysterious world, full of secrets and supernatural forces, as he attempts to help the boy. The film is full of twists and turns, leading up to a shocking ending that leaves the audience stunned.

Groundhog Day (1993)

Groundhog Day
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott, Stephen Tobolowsky
Rated PG

Groundhog Day tells the story of Phil Connors (played by Bill Murray), a cynical TV weatherman who is sent to cover the annual Groundhog Day celebration in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Much to his dismay, Phil finds himself reliving the same day over and over and over again. No matter what he does, he wakes up the next morning to find that it’s still Groundhog Day. Through trial and error, Phil gradually learns to use this phenomenon to his advantage, eventually finding a way to break the time loop and live a better life. Groundhog Day is a comedy-drama that examines the human condition and the power of personal transformation.

Blade Runner (1982)

Blade Runner
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ridley Scott, starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos
Rated R

Blade Runner (1982) is a science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. The film follows the story of Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former police officer and Blade Runner, who is tasked by his former employers to hunt down and terminate four replicants (bioengineered humans) who have escaped from an off-world colony and are hiding in Los Angeles. As Deckard tracks the replicants, he begins to question his own humanity and morality of his job, while dealing with a mysterious woman (Sean Young) who may or may not be a replicant. With its dystopian vision of a future, Blade Runner is a landmark in science fiction cinema, blending together elements of film noir, horror, and sci-fi, and was influential on the development of cyberpunk culture.

Into the Wild (2007)

Into the Wild
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sean Penn, starring Emile Hirsch, Vince Vaughn, Catherine Keener, Marcia Gay Harden
Rated R

Into the Wild tells the story of Christopher McCandless, a young man from a privileged background who abandons his possessions, gives his entire savings account to charity, and hitchhikes to Alaska in search of a more meaningful life. Along the way, he meets a variety of people who each shape his journey. As he grows more distant from society and nature, his journey takes a tragic turn. The film is ultimately a story of an individual's search for meaning, acceptance, and freedom in the face of overwhelming odds.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles
Rated PG

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 American drama film directed by Peter Weir, written by Tom Schulman, and starring Robin Williams. Set in 1959 at the fictional Welton Academy, a private boys’ preparatory school, the film tells the story of an English teacher who inspires his students through his teaching of poetry. The teacher, John Keating, challenges his students to go against the status quo and make their lives extraordinary. Through his teaching, Keating encourages the boys to "seize the day" and make their lives meaningful. Keating also makes them aware of the Dead Poets Society, a secret club that he was a part of when he was a student. The club meets in a cave to read and discuss poetry and other literature. The film follows the story of the students as they explore their lives and relationships with each other, their parents, and the world around them. In the end, the students are able to find their own voices and use them to make a difference in their lives.

Gandhi (1982)

Gandhi
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Attenborough, starring Ben Kingsley, John Gielgud, Rohini Hattangadi, Roshan Seth
Rated PG

Gandhi (1982) tells the story of the life of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, an Indian lawyer-turned-political activist who led a nonviolent civil disobedience campaign against the British rule of India during the early 1900s. Richard Attenborough's biopic follows the transformation of Gandhi from a shy, timid lawyer to a revered leader of India's independence movement. The film chronicles various aspects of Gandhi's life, from his childhood, to his struggles with racism in South Africa, to his rise as a revolutionary leader in India. Through his philosophy of nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi leads a series of successful campaigns, including the famous Salt March, which brings him to international attention and ultimately leads to India's independence. The film is a powerful tribute to an iconic leader, and a reminder of the power of peaceful protest.

12 Years a Slave (2013)

12 Years a Slave
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Steve McQueen, starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Kenneth Williams, Michael Fassbender, Brad Pitt
Rated R

12 Years a Slave is a 2013 historical drama film directed by Steve McQueen, and based on the 1853 autobiography of the same name by Solomon Northup. The film follows the story of Solomon Northup, a free African American man from Saratoga, New York, who is kidnapped and sold into slavery in the Deep South. He spends his next twelve years trying to survive and gain his freedom. Along the way, he suffers many hardships, including torture and abuse at the hands of a cruel plantation owner, as well as severe mistreatment from other white supremacists. Despite these obstacles, he never loses hope of being reunited with his family. Through perseverance, a kind-hearted white lawyer, and a spiritual connection to his ancestors, Solomon eventually gains his freedom. 12 Years a Slave is an inspiring story of courage, resilience, and hope.

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (2003)

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Kim Ki-duk, starring Kim Ki-duk, Oh Yeong-su, Jong-ho Kim, Kim Young-min
Rated R

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring is a 2003 South Korean film directed by Kim Ki-duk. It tells the story of an aging Buddhist monk and his young disciple as they experience the passing of the seasons over the course of their lives. The film follows the two characters as they transition from innocence and naivety in spring, to the struggles and temptations of summer, to the wisdom and understanding of fall, and to the self-reflection and insight of winter. Through the cycle of life, the monk teaches his disciple about the Buddhist path of self-enlightenment. As the film progresses, the audience is given a thoughtful and contemplative look at the cycle of life, death, and rebirth.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is an offbeat, science-fiction drama about a troubled teen who is plagued by visions of a huge, demonic rabbit, who instructs him to commit a series of crimes. After narrowly escaping a bizarre accident, Donnie learns that the world will end in 28 days and embarks on a quest to figure out the meaning behind his doomsday premonition. Along the way, he discovers secrets about his family, the history of his town, and ultimately his own true destiny.

12 Monkeys (1995)

12 Monkeys
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Gilliam, starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Brad Pitt, Joseph Melito
Rated R

12 Monkeys is a 1995 science fiction film directed by Terry Gilliam and starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, and Brad Pitt. The movie follows the story of a time traveler, James Cole (Willis), sent from the post-apocalyptic future of 2035 to the present day of 1996, to look for a virus that wiped out most of humanity. In his travels, Cole meets Jeffrey Goines (Pitt), a brilliant mental patient, and Dr. Kathryn Railly (Stowe), a psychiatrist. Through a series of events, Cole discovers the virus was unleashed by a mysterious group called the Army of the 12 Monkeys. With the help of Dr. Railly, Cole must find a way to stop the Army of the 12 Monkeys and prevent the future apocalypse. The film is a thrilling journey through the past, present, and future, filled with mysterious twists and turns, and examines the complex interplay between fate and free will.

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)

Blade Runner 2049
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Denis Villeneuve, starring Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas, Dave Bautista
Rated R

Blade Runner 2049 is an epic neo-noir science fiction film directed by Denis Villeneuve and starring Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford, Ana de Armas, Sylvia Hoeks, Robin Wright, Mackenzie Davis, Carla Juri, Lennie James, Dave Bautista, and Jared Leto. Set thirty years after the events of the original Blade Runner, the story follows the new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Gosling), as he discovers a secret that could plunge what’s left of society into chaos. His discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Ford), a former blade runner who has been missing for thirty years. Along the way, K is beset by foes, both human and replicant, in a dark odyssey that will bring him face to face with his own destructive past and ultimately uncover crucial answers about the future of the human race.

 



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