Movies About The Environment

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Movies About The Environment

Ever viewed these Movies About The Environment? We know for sure you'll find some new picks. Here are 17 of the top ones.

Sicko (2007)

Sicko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Michael Moore, starring Michael Moore, Tucker Albrizzi, Tony Benn, George W. Bush
Rated PG-13

Sicko is a 2007 documentary written and directed by Michael Moore. The film examines the United States health care system, focusing on its health insurance and the pharmaceutical industry. Moore focuses on the fact that millions of Americans are without health insurance, or are underinsured, and that the United States is the only first-world nation without universal health care. He then compares the health care systems of the US to those of other first-world nations, including the United Kingdom, France, and Canada, and visits the homes of the citizens of each to see the difference in their health care. Moore also visits the homes of numerous people whose stories he incorporated into his film, including a woman who died of a brain tumor due to a lack of health insurance, a group of 9/11 rescue workers who are denied medical treatment, and a group of people who were victims of HMO malpractice. Moore concludes that the United States health care system should be reformed, with a single-payer system being the best option.

Speciesism: The Movie (2013)

Speciesism: The Movie
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Mark Devries, starring Steven Best, Richard Dawkins, Gary Francione, Bruce Friedrich
Rated Not Rated

Speciesism: The Movie is an exploration of the idea of speciesism, which is the belief that humans are superior to animals and should have greater rights than them. It follows filmmaker Mark Devries as he visits factory farms, laboratories, and interviews animal rights activists and scientists. The film looks at the moral, ethical, and environmental implications of animal exploitation and examines the case for a rethinking of the way we view animals. It also examines the theories of animal rights experts, the impact of industrial agriculture, and the role of corporations in the exploitation of animals. Ultimately, Speciesism: The Movie raises important questions about our moral responsibility to animals and the implications of our actions.

Food, Inc. (2008)

Food, Inc.
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Robert Kenner, starring Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser, Richard Lobb, Vince Edwards
Rated PG

“Food, Inc.” is a 2008 documentary by Robert Kenner that examines the industrial production of food in America and the consequences it has for both our health and the environment. The film looks at the ways in which agribusinesses have come to dominate the food industry and how this has led to unhealthy eating habits, environmental destruction, and a decrease in the diversity of crops. It explores the various ways in which food is produced, from factory farming to organic farming and examines the health, environmental, and economic impacts of each. The film also looks at how government policies have shaped the food industry and how we can take action to create a healthier food system.

Fed Up (2014)

Fed Up
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Stephanie Soechtig, starring Michele Simon, Katie Couric, Bill Clinton, Michael Pollan
Rated PG

Fed Up is a 2014 documentary from director Stephanie Soechtig which examines the causes and effects of America's obesity epidemic. The film follows several individuals struggling with weight-related health issues and shows how food industries have worked to increase the prevalence of unhealthy food in the United States and around the world. The film exposes how the food industry has created a food system that is designed to keep people addicted to unhealthy food, leading to diet-related diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. It also identifies the lack of nutritional education, political lobbying, and marketing of unhealthy food as significant contributing factors to the current health crisis. The film argues that the only way to end the obesity epidemic is to make dietary and lifestyle changes, such as eating more whole foods and exercising regularly. Ultimately, Fed Up seeks to educate viewers about the dangers of processed food and the importance of making healthier dietary choices.

Forks Over Knives (2011)

Forks Over Knives
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Lee Fulkerson, starring Lee Fulkerson, Matthew Lederman, Alona Pulde, T. Colin Campbell
Rated PG

Forks Over Knives is a documentary film which examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting animal-based and processed foods. Following the stories of several individuals whose lives were drastically changed after adopting a whole-food, plant-based diet, the film then explores the scientific evidence behind the idea, showing how modern animal-based and processed diets have led to epidemic rates of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. The film also looks at the agricultural industry and its contribution to the development of these dietary-related health problems. By eating whole, plant-based foods, individuals are able to reduce their risk of chronic disease and improve their overall health.

The Future of Food (2004)

The Future of Food
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Deborah Koons Garcia, starring Charles Benbrook, Grace Booth, George W. Bush, Ignacio Chapela
Rated Not Rated

The Future of Food is a documentary that examines the complex and controversial food industry, its corporate players, and the effects of industrial agriculture on the environment, public health, and the rural farming communities. The film traces the history of industrial food production and its impact on our lives and the environment. It explores the implications of new technologies such as genetic engineering and patenting of life forms and their effects on food production and nutrition. The film also looks at the rise of the organic food movement, which is growing in response to the negative impacts of industrial agriculture. The film reveals the disturbing truth behind the food we eat and provides solutions to the current food crisis.

Who Killed the Electric Car? (2006)

Who Killed the Electric Car?
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Chris Paine, starring Martin Sheen, Tom Hanks, Mel Gibson, Reverend Gadget
Rated PG

Who Killed the Electric Car? is a 2006 documentary film that examines the creation and destruction of the modern electric car. In the 1990s, major car manufacturers such as General Motors created electric cars that would reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. However, these cars were quickly taken off the market due to political, economic, and cultural pressures. The film follows the investigations of individuals and communities as they attempt to uncover the truth behind the disappearance of the electric car. Through interviews with industry insiders and scientists, the film exposes the conspiracy behind the electric car and how it was destroyed before it had a chance to make a difference. The film ultimately reveals how the electric car could have revolutionized the auto industry and how its destruction was caused by a lack of interest and political inaction.

Our Daily Bread (2005)

Our Daily Bread
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Nikolaus Geyrhalter, starring Claus Hansen Petz, Arkadiusz Rydellek, Barbara Hinz, Renata Wypchlo
Rated Not Rated

Our Daily Bread is a documentary by Austrian filmmaker Nikolaus Geyrhalter that explores the food production industry in Europe. The film follows the everyday operations of a variety of factories, farms, and food processing plants, and examines the effects of industrial agriculture on people’s lives. The film is mostly composed of long, observational shots of the machines and workers in the factories, with no narration or interviews. The film gives a unique insight into the realities of modern food production, and the complex network of human and machine labor that make it possible.

Merchants of Doubt (2014)

Merchants of Doubt
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Robert Kenner, starring Frederick Singer, Naomi Oreskes, Jamy Ian Swiss, Sam Roe
Rated PG-13

Merchants of Doubt is a documentary film that examines how a handful of highly influential scientists and media personalities have been able to spread doubt and confusion about well-established scientific phenomena such as climate change and the dangers of smoking. Through interviews with experts and archival footage, the film argues that these individuals are able to shape public opinion by creating doubt and uncertainty about scientific evidence. The film also looks at the implications of this phenomenon for democracy and for public health, as well as for society in general.

More Than Honey (2012)

More Than Honey
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Markus Imhoof, starring Fred Jaggi, Randolf Menzel, John Miller, Liane Singer
Rated Unrated

More Than Honey is a documentary film directed by Markus Imhoof that delves into the mysterious decline of the world’s bee population. Through interviews with beekeepers, scientists, and farmers from around the world, Imhoof investigates the various factors that may be responsible for the bee’s decreasing numbers. From parasites and viruses to pesticides and industrial farming, Imhoof examines the human impact on bee colonies, and highlights the importance of the bee to our global food supply. Ultimately, the film calls for a more sustainable approach to beekeeping and an understanding of the vital role bees play in our ecosystem.

The Price of Sugar (2007)

The Price of Sugar
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Bill Haney, starring Paul Newman, Christopher Hartley
Rated Unrated

The Price of Sugar is a 2007 documentary film directed by Bill Haney that tells the story of the exploitation of Haitian migrant labor in the Dominican Republic. The film follows the journey of Father Christopher Hartley, a Spanish priest who has been working with the Haitians for over 15 years and takes a closer look at the poverty and injustice faced by these workers. The film exposes the reality of the life of these workers as they are paid miserable wages and forced to work in dangerous conditions in order to harvest sugar cane for the Dominican Republic's powerful sugar industry. It also examines the complex relationship between the Dominican Republic and Haiti and the legacy of racism and economic disparity that plagues both countries. Ultimately, the film shows how the sugar industry has been profiting from this exploitation while the Haitian workers remain trapped in a cycle of poverty and injustice.

Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead (2010)

Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Joe Cross, Kurt Engfehr, starring Joe Cross, Amy Badberg, Merv Cross, Virginia Cross
Rated Not Rated

Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead is a 2010 documentary film about the incredible journey of Joe Cross, an Australian entrepreneur who was suffering from a debilitating autoimmune disease and obesity. After being told by his doctor to make a change in his life or die, Cross embarks on an inspiring journey of transformation. He begins a journey across the United States, meeting a variety of people while consuming only fruit and vegetable juice for 60 days. As his health and physical appearance dramatically improve, Cross educates and motivates others to make similar changes in their lives. Along the way, he meets Phil, an obese truck driver from Arizona who is inspired to join Cross in his juicing journey. Together, the two men embark on a life-changing road trip. At the end of the film, Cross has lost over 80 pounds and has completely reversed his autoimmune disease. Phil has also made great strides in his health, losing over 100 pounds.

An Inconvenient Truth (2006)

An Inconvenient Truth
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Davis Guggenheim, starring Al Gore, Billy West, George Bush, George W. Bush
Rated PG

Capitalism: A Love Story (2009)

Capitalism: A Love Story
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Michael Moore, starring Michael Moore, William Black, Jimmy Carter, Elijah Cummings
Rated R

Farmageddon (2011)

Farmageddon
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Kristin Canty, starring Linda Faillace, Adam Helfer, Mark McAfee, Joel Salatin
Rated Unrated

King Corn (2007)

King Corn
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Aaron Woolf, starring Bob Bledsoe, Earl L. Butz, Dawn Cheney, Ian Cheney
Rated Unrated

Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution (2008)

Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Paul Jaud, starring Star: Perico Légasse
Rated TV-G

 



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