Movies About Cystic Fibrosis

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Movies About Cystic Fibrosis

Have you heard these Movies About Cystic Fibrosis? We promise you'll find some new picks. We wrote about 25 of the best ones.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Miloš Forman, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey. It stars Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, William Redfield, and Brad Dourif. The story follows Randle McMurphy, a charming but rebellious criminal who feigns mental illness in order to serve a shorter prison sentence in a mental hospital, only to be faced with the oppressive regimes of authoritarian nurse Mildred Ratched. The film is about McMurphy's rebellion against Ratched’s authority, and his attempt to liberate the other inmates from the oppressive environment. It won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Nicholson. It is considered one of the greatest films of all time.

The Intouchables (2011)

The Intouchables
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Olivier Nakache, Éric Toledano, starring François Cluzet, Omar Sy, Anne Le Ny, Audrey Fleurot
Rated R

The Intouchables is a 2011 French buddy comedy-drama directed by Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano. It stars François Cluzet and Omar Sy as two unlikely friends, Philippe, a wealthy white quadriplegic, and Driss, a poor black ex-convict who has been hired to take care of him. Despite their completely different backgrounds, Philippe and Driss develop a strong bond over the course of their time together. As Driss helps Philippe adjust to his disability, Philippe introduces Driss to the finer things in life and encourages him to pursue his dreams. Through their friendship, both men learn to step outside their comfort zones and take risks. In the end, the pair discover that it's possible to find joy and purpose in life even in the most unexpected places.

The Elephant Man (1980)

The Elephant Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Anthony Hopkins, John Hurt, Anne Bancroft, John Gielgud
Rated PG

The Elephant Man is a 1980 biographical drama film directed by David Lynch. The film follows the life of Joseph Merrick (known as John in the film), an English man living in London during the 19th century, who suffers from extreme physical deformities due to a disease known as Proteus Syndrome. His physical appearance makes him a social outcast and he is put on display in a freak show, where he is known as the Elephant Man. Eventually he is taken in by Frederick Treves, a surgeon at London Hospital, who gives him shelter and protection. Despite his physical deformities, Merrick displays a kind and gentle nature and a keen intelligence. He begins to gain acceptance within society, including a friendship with the head of the hospital, but his condition continues to worsen and ultimately leads to his death in 1890. The Elephant Man is a powerful and moving story of perseverance and human dignity.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 biographical drama film directed by Ron Howard, and starring Russell Crowe as the Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr. The film follows the life of Nash, a genius mathematician and his struggles with mental illness. At the beginning of the film, Nash is a graduate student at Princeton University who discovers a revolutionary mathematical theorem. However, his success is soon overshadowed by paranoid schizophrenia, which affects and isolates him from those around him, including his wife and friends. Despite his illness, Nash manages to overcome his struggles and eventually wins the Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking work. The film follows his journey from his diagnosis and his recovery, as well as his continuing struggle with his mental illness. Ultimately, the film focuses on the power of determination and resilience, and how one can overcome incredible odds and adversity.

A Silent Voice: The Movie (2016)

A Silent Voice: The Movie
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Naoko Yamada, starring Miyu Irino, Saori Hayami, Aoi Yûki, Kenshô Ono
Rated Not Rated

A Silent Voice: The Movie is a 2016 animated film that tells the story of Shoya Ishida, a school bully who makes life miserable for Shoko, a quiet transfer student who is deaf. When Shoya realizes the consequences of his actions, he sets out to make amends for his past mistakes. Along the way, he discovers the strength of friendship and learns to accept himself. Through each character’s journey, the film explores the power of communication and understanding, and the importance of second chances.

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

A Woman Under the Influence
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From John Cassavetes, starring Gena Rowlands, Peter Falk, Fred Draper, Lady Rowlands
Rated R

A Woman Under the Influence is a 1974 drama directed by John Cassavetes, starring his wife Gena Rowlands as Mabel Longhetti, a housewife and mother of three struggling with mental illness. Her husband, Nick Longhetti (Peter Falk) is a construction worker who is struggling to understand her erratic behavior. As her mental health deteriorates, Mabel's family is forced to confront the harsh reality of her illness while trying to keep her safe and help her get better. The film is shot in a naturalistic style as it follows Mabel's plight with unflinching realism and compassion. Ultimately, the film is a powerful exploration of how mental illness affects the lives of those close to the sufferer.

Million Dollar Baby (2004)

Million Dollar Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Clint Eastwood, starring Hilary Swank, Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Jay Baruchel
Rated PG-13

Million Dollar Baby is the story of an underdog boxer, Maggie Fitzgerald (Hilary Swank), and her journey to the top. With the help of her trainer, Frankie Dunn (Clint Eastwood), Maggie works her way up from amateur to professional boxing. Along the way, the two form a powerful bond, with Frankie helping Maggie achieve her dreams while also coming to terms with his own personal demons. The film culminates in an unexpected tragedy that changes everything. Along the way Maggie and Frankie explore themes of friendship, loss, courage and redemption.

The Miracle Worker (1962)

The Miracle Worker
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Arthur Penn, starring Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson
Rated Approved

The Miracle Worker is a 1962 American biographical drama film directed by Arthur Penn. It tells the story of the famous teacher Annie Sullivan and her student, blind and deaf Helen Keller. It covers the volatile relationship between the two, and how Sullivan teaches Keller how to communicate by connecting objects and words. Through persistence and love, Sullivan helps Keller to understand the world around her, including the power of language, which was previously inaccessible to her. The film features an Academy Award-winning performance by Anne Bancroft as Sullivan and an Academy Award-nominated performance by Patty Duke as Keller.

Scent of a Woman (1992)

Scent of a Woman
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Martin Brest, starring Al Pacino, Chris O'Donnell, James Rebhorn, Gabrielle Anwar
Rated R

"Scent of a Woman" is a 1992 American drama film directed by Martin Brest and starring Al Pacino and Chris O'Donnell. It tells the story of a young man, Charlie Simms (Chris O'Donnell), who takes a job as a caretaker to a bitter and blind war veteran, Lt. Col. Frank Slade (Al Pacino). As Slade and Charlie get to know each other, Charlie learns more about life and himself. Slade helps Charlie understand the importance of standing up for what is right and teaches him to stand up for himself. Along the way, Charlie falls for Slade's niece, Donna (Gabrielle Anwar). In the end, Slade helps Charlie turn his life around and Charlie returns the favor by helping Slade confront his past.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Julian Schnabel, starring Mathieu Amalric, Emmanuelle Seigner, Marie-Josée Croze, Anne Consigny
Rated PG-13

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is a French biographical drama film directed by Julian Schnabel and based on the memoir of the same title by Jean-Dominique Bauby. The film tells the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, a successful French journalist, living and working in Paris, who suffers a stroke that leaves him completely paralyzed and able to communicate only by blinking his left eye. Despite his physical limitations, he manages to dictate a memoir to a transcriber through his thoughts, memories, and dreams. Through this memoir, we learn of his wishes, regrets, hopes, and fears. The film shows how Bauby finds solace and purpose in the simple joys of life, such as the warmth of his children and the beauty of nature. Ultimately, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is a touching story of courage, hope, and resilience in the face of extreme physical and emotional hardship.

Rain Man (1988)

Rain Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Barry Levinson, starring Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise, Valeria Golino, Gerald R. Molen
Rated R

Rain Man is a 1988 American road comedy-drama film directed by Barry Levinson and written by Barry Morrow and Ronald Bass. It tells the story of an abrasive, selfish young wheeler-dealer Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), who discovers that his estranged father has died and bequeathed all of his multimillion-dollar estate to his other son, Raymond (Dustin Hoffman), an autistic savant, of whose existence Charlie was unaware. Charlie is left with only his father's car and some cryptic telephone messages. He sets out on a cross-country trip with Raymond to find his father's estate and discover the truth about his family. Along the way, the two brothers find common ground as they learn to trust and care for each other. The film was a major critical and commercial success, and won four Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Director, and Best Actor in a Leading Role for Dustin Hoffman.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is a psychological thriller about a troubled teenager living in a small town in Virginia in 1988. Donnie (played by Jake Gyllenhaal) is a troubled young man who is suffering from hallucinations, sleepwalking, and violent outbursts. One night, he is visited by a giant rabbit named Frank who tells him that the world will end in 28 days, 6 hours, 42 minutes, and 12 seconds. Donnie embarks on a journey of self-discovery while trying to prevent the apocalypse, discovering dark secrets and even darker truths about himself and his family. Along the way, he is helped by a mysterious figure known as The Philosophy of Time Travelers, a cult book that contains the secrets of time travel. As the clock winds down, Donnie must make a choice between saving the world and saving himself.

My Left Foot (1989)

My Left Foot
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Jim Sheridan, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Brenda Fricker, Alison Whelan, Kirsten Sheridan
Rated R

My Left Foot is a biographical drama film that follows the life of Christy Brown, an Irishman born with cerebral palsy. Despite his disability, Christy is determined to live a fully realized life and manages to do so with the unwavering support of his family. He learns to write and paint with his left foot, eventually becoming a celebrated author and artist. Through his perseverance, Christy overcomes his disability and gains the admiration of his family, friends, and the world. The film stars Daniel Day-Lewis as Christy and Brenda Fricker as his mother, who helps him every step of the way. The film was a critical success, winning two Academy Awards, for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress.

Wonder (2017)

Wonder
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Stephen Chbosky, starring Jacob Tremblay, Owen Wilson, Izabela Vidovic, Julia Roberts
Rated PG

Wonder is a 2017 American drama film directed by Stephen Chbosky, based on the novel of the same name by R. J. Palacio. The film stars Julia Roberts, Owen Wilson, Jacob Tremblay, Izabela Vidovic, Mandy Patinkin and Daveed Diggs. It tells the story of Auggie Pullman, a young boy born with a facial deformity, and his family's journey as they navigate their way through the struggles of self-acceptance in a world that is often unkind. With the support of his family, teachers, and classmates, Auggie embarks on a journey of self-discovery and learning to accept himself as he is. The film is a heartfelt and inspiring story of courage, acceptance and friendship.

My Name Is Khan (2010)

My Name Is Khan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Karan Johar, starring Shah Rukh Khan, Kajol, Sheetal Menon, Katie Amanda Keane
Rated PG-13

My Name Is Khan is a 2010 Indian dramedy-romance film directed by Karan Johar and starring Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol. The film follows the story of Rizwan Khan, an Indian Muslim with Asperger's syndrome, and tells of his journey from India to the United States after being accused of terrorism by the FBI. Rizwan's journey is a quest to find his place in the world and prove to the world that he is not a terrorist, but a good person. Along the way, he meets and falls in love with Mandira, a Hindu single mother, and the two become inseparable despite their religious differences. The film is a heartfelt ode to the power of love and tolerance, and the importance of understanding and acceptance in a world full of hatred and prejudice.

The Way He Looks (2014)

The Way He Looks
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Daniel Ribeiro, starring Ghilherme Lobo, Fabio Audi, Tess Amorim, Lúcia Romano
Rated Not Rated

The Way He Looks is a Brazilian coming-of-age drama directed by Daniel Ribeiro. The story follows Leonardo, a blind high school student who has grown tired of his overprotective parents and desperate for independence. When a new student, Gabriel, arrives at school, a friendship begins to form between the two, and Leonardo discovers there is more to life than he realizes. With the help of his newfound friend, Leonardo must learn to live in the world on his own terms and take control of his own destiny. Along the way, he finds out that love can come in many forms and that it is not always blind. Through his journey of self-discovery, Leonardo must learn to accept himself and the world around him, in all its beauty and flaws.

Sound and Fury (2000)

Sound and Fury
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Josh Aronson, starring Jaime Leigh Allen, Jemma Braham, Freeda Cat, Scott Davidson
Rated Not Rated

Sound and Fury is a 2000 documentary by director Josh Aronson that explores the complex relationship between two families: the Artinians and the Artinian-Heards. Both families are deaf, but their views on deafness are in stark contrast. The Artinians are staunch advocates of sign language and a traditional, deaf-oriented lifestyle, while the Artinian-Heards embrace the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants to enable their children to learn to speak and, by extension, better assimilate into the hearing world. The film follows both families and their struggles to come to terms with their conflicting views about how best to raise their children. It also touches on the broader sociopolitical issues surrounding deafness and technology as it relates to the lives of the deaf community. Ultimately, the film seeks to provide a compassionate look at the difficult choices that both families have to make, and the consequences of those decisions.

Freaks (1932)

Freaks
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Tod Browning, starring Wallace Ford, Leila Hyams, Olga Baclanova, Roscoe Ates
Rated Not Rated

Freaks is a 1932 American horror film directed by Tod Browning and starring Wallace Ford, Leila Hyams, Olga Baclanova, and Roscoe Ates. The film follows a group of carnival sideshow performers, referred to as "freaks," who revenge themselves against a beautiful trapeze artist who insults them. The story follows Hans, a dwarf who falls in love with the trapeze artist Cleopatra. When Cleopatra discovers his true identity, she mocks him and schemes to marry him for his inheritance. The "freaks," led by the strongman Hercules, plot revenge against Cleopatra and Hans is forced to choose between his loyalty to his friends and his love for Cleopatra. The film was met with immense controversy upon its release and was eventually banned in many countries. It has since been recognized as a unique film which broke many boundaries in the horror genre. The film has gained a cult following over the years and is now regarded as a classic of the genre.

Rory O'Shea Was Here (2004)

Rory O'Shea Was Here
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Damien O'Donnell, starring James McAvoy, Steven Robertson, Romola Garai, Alan King
Rated R

Rory O'Shea Was Here is a 2004 British-Irish drama film directed by Damien O'Donnell. The film follows Rory O'Shea (James McAvoy), a young man with motor neurone disease who moves into a nursing home run by a strict matron. With the help of his new friend Michael Connolly (Steven Robertson), Rory is determined to make the most of his remaining time by pushing the boundaries of what is expected of him. Together, the two discover a newfound freedom, confidence and strength. As their friendship grows, together they challenge the system, confront their fears and ultimately, learn to live life to the fullest.

The Theory of Everything (2014)

The Theory of Everything
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James Marsh, starring Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Tom Prior, Sophie Perry
Rated PG-13

The Theory of Everything is a romantic biographical drama set in the 1960s and directed by James Marsh. It follows the relationship between renowned physicist Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) and his first wife, Jane Wilde (Felicity Jones). The film chronicles their courtship, marriage, and the effects of Hawking's battle with ALS, a motor neuron disease. The movie documents Hawking's development of his theories on time, space, and the origin of the universe, as well as his increasing fame and successful academic career. It also explores how his physical decline has a profound effect on Jane and their family. The film ultimately celebrates their enduring love, and offers an uplifting, inspirational story of determination in the face of adversity.

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

Silver Linings Playbook
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David O. Russell, starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver
Rated R

Silver Linings Playbook is a 2012 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by David O. Russell. It stars Bradley Cooper as Pat Solitano, Jr., a man with bipolar disorder who is released from a psychiatric hospital and moves back in with his parents (Robert DeNiro and Jacki Weaver). Pat's goal is to rebuild his life and reunite with his estranged wife, but he finds that his parents, his therapist (Anupam Kher), and the other members of his support group have their own ideas about how he should go about it. Pat meets Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a mysterious young widow with problems of her own. Through their shared experiences, the two forge a deep connection that helps them both find their own silver linings. The film was a critical and commercial success, and was nominated for eight Academy Awards, winning Best Actress for Jennifer Lawrence.

What's Eating Gilbert Grape (1993)

What's Eating Gilbert Grape
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Lasse Hallström, starring Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis, Mary Steenburgen
Rated PG-13

What's Eating Gilbert Grape is a 1993 drama film directed by Lasse Hallström and starring Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis, and Mary Steenburgen. The film tells the story of Gilbert Grape (Depp), a young man living in a small Iowa town who is struggling to take care of his mentally disabled brother (DiCaprio) and obese mother (Steenburgen). Gilbert's life changes the day a free-spirited young woman (Lewis) and her grandmother arrive in town and he begins to contemplate his future and his own desire for a better life. The film touches on themes such as family responsibility, loneliness, coming of age, and facing one's fears and limitations.

Ray (2004)

Ray
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Taylor Hackford, starring Jamie Foxx, Regina King, Kerry Washington, Clifton Powell
Rated PG-13

Ray is a biographical film based on the life of American musician Ray Charles. It follows the story of Ray’s childhood in the south and his rise to fame as one of the most influential and successful musicians in history. Ray's personal struggles with drug addiction and blindness, as well as his complex relationships with women, are highlighted throughout the film. The film explores the personal and professional success that Ray had, as well as the challenges he faced as a black man in the music industry. Through his determination and self-belief, Ray managed to overcome these obstacles and become an iconic American musician. The film is directed by Taylor Hackford and stars Jamie Foxx, who won an academy award for his performance.

Murderball (2005)

Murderball
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Henry Alex Rubin, Dana Adam Shapiro, starring Joe Soares, Keith Cavill, Mark Zupan, Robert Soares
Rated R

Murderball (2005) is a documentary directed by Henry Alex Rubin and Dana Adam Shapiro. The film follows the story of quadriplegic athletes as they prepare for and compete in the Paralympic sport of wheelchair rugby, also known as “murderball.” The film showcases the intensity and challenge of the sport, and highlights the inspiring stories of the athletes who are determined to prove that they are more than just their disabilities. Along the way, the film explores the physical and psychological aspects of the athletes’ lives, and their relationships with each other. Ultimately, the film is an uplifting tale of courage, strength, and determination in the face of adversity.

As Good as It Gets (1997)

As Good as It Gets
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James L. Brooks, starring Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear, Cuba Gooding Jr.
Rated PG-13

As Good as It Gets is a 1997 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by James L. Brooks, starring Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt and Greg Kinnear. Set in New York City, the film follows Melvin Udall (Nicholson), an obsessive-compulsive novelist, and Carol Connelly (Hunt), a single mother and waitress, as they build an unlikely friendship and face the challenges of life. The film also stars Cuba Gooding Jr. as Simon, a gay artist and neighbor of Melvin's, and Skeet Ulrich as Frank, an aspiring artist and Carol's son. Melvin is a misanthropic and obsessive-compulsive novelist whose life revolves around routine. One day, Carol's son is attacked by a dog belonging to Melvin's neighbor, and Melvin has to take him to the hospital. This event forces Melvin and Carol to develop an unlikely friendship, which ultimately helps them both to find a better life. Throughout the film, Melvin struggles to overcome his own personal demons and learns to appreciate life, ultimately finding love, friendship, and happiness.

 



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