Best Movies About Business

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Best Movies About Business

Ever viewed these Best Movies About Business? We promise you'll find some new films. We gathered 25 of the top ones.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather tells the story of a powerful Italian-American crime family, the Corleones, in the years 1945-1955. The movie follows the family's patriarch, Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando), as he leads his family and the powerful criminal organization he has built. His eldest son, Sonny (James Caan), is the hotheaded enforcer of the family. His youngest son, Michael (Al Pacino), is a college-educated war hero who initially wants no part of the family business. But when his father is nearly assassinated and Sonny is murdered, Michael steps up to become the new Don of the Corleone family and builds the empire even further. He must also contend with rival families and treacherous situations in order to protect and ensure the future of his family. Ultimately, Michael must make a final, fateful decision that will forever change the Corleone legacy.

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather Part II is a 1974 American crime drama directed by Francis Ford Coppola and a sequel to The Godfather (1972). It stars Al Pacino as Michael Corleone, the new head of the Corleone crime family, and Robert De Niro as Vito Corleone, the family's patriarch. The film follows two parallel storylines - one chronicles Michael's efforts to expand the family business, while the other follows Vito's rise to power in 1900s New York. As Michael faces rivals from other mafia families, he also has to contend with his own inner struggles. Meanwhile, Vito maintains his moral principles while establishing himself as a powerful figure in the Mafia. The film earned critical acclaim and was a box office success, becoming the second installment in the The Godfather trilogy. It won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Coppola.

12 Angry Men (1957)

12 Angry Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Martin Balsam, John Fiedler
Rated Approved

12 Angry Men is a classic courtroom drama, directed by Sidney Lumet in 1957. The film focuses on a jury of twelve men tasked with reaching a verdict in a homicide trial. As the deliberations progress, prejudices and preconceptions are challenged as each man struggles to decide if the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. One juror, played by Henry Fonda, is the lone hold out in an otherwise unanimous vote of guilty. Through a series of intense conversations and debates, he slowly convinces the other jurors to look past their preconceived notions and consider the case more objectively. In the end, the jury reaches a unanimous not-guilty verdict. The film shows how the jury is able to come to the right decision by overcoming their preconceptions and looking at the facts objectively.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) is a simple man with a low IQ but good intentions. His true love, Jenny Curran (Robin Wright), eludes him throughout his life. Despite this, his optimism and perseverance lead him on an extraordinary journey, taking him from the battlefields of Vietnam to the halls of Congress, from the wars of the south to the boardrooms of the north. Along the way, Forrest meets a series of interesting people, including a Ping-Pong champion, a Vietnam platoon-mate, an entrepreneur, and a world-famous talk show host. Forrest's unique view of the world and his unwavering faith in the power of love eventually make him a national celebrity and an enduring symbol of innocence in a rapidly changing world.

It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

It's a Wonderful Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Capra, starring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Thomas Mitchell
Rated PG

It's a Wonderful Life tells the story of George Bailey, a man living in the small town of Bedford Falls who has devoted his life to helping others. When he finds himself facing financial ruin and a potentially disastrous scandal, he contemplates ending his life on Christmas Eve. At the last minute, he is visited by his guardian angel Clarence Oddbody, who shows George what life would have been like if he had never existed. Through a series of flashbacks, George learns of the countless lives he has touched for the better, and his faith in humanity is restored. In the end, George decides to keep living, and the people of Bedford Falls come together to save him from his financial woes.

Casablanca (1942)

Casablanca
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains
Rated PG

Casablanca is a classic romantic drama set in the Casablanca of French-controlled Morocco during World War II. Humphrey Bogart stars as Rick Blaine, a cynical American expatriate running a nightclub for refugees trying to escape the Nazis. When Ilsa Lund, a former lover played by Ingrid Bergman, re-enters his life, Rick is forced to choose between his own happiness and helping her reunite with her husband, resistance leader Victor Laszlo. With the help of his friend, the club's piano player, Sam, and an array of colorful characters, Rick ultimately makes the noble sacrifice and helps Ilsa and Laszlo escape to freedom.

Modern Times (1936)

Modern Times
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Charles Chaplin, starring Charles Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Henry Bergman, Tiny Sandford
Rated G

Modern Times is an iconic classic comedy silent film written, directed, produced and starring Charles Chaplin. The film follows Chaplin’s iconic character, the Little Tramp, as he navigates the modern times of industrialization, automation, and the struggle of the working class to survive. Chaplin’s character is hired by a factory and struggles with automation, eventually causing a machine to break and getting into trouble with his boss. He then meets a beautiful, young gamine with whom he falls in love, and the two escape the city and embark on a series of adventures and misadventures. Along the way, they must evade police and struggle to survive while trying to make sense of the new world they are in. Modern Times is an iconic classic that has left a lasting impression and influence on comedy films. It is a satirical look at the industrial age, the effects of technology on society, the power struggle between the working class and the corporate world, and the hope and joy of finding love in a seemingly impossible world.

Citizen Kane (1941)

Citizen Kane
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Orson Welles, starring Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore, Agnes Moorehead
Rated PG

Citizen Kane is a 1941 American drama film directed, co-written, produced and starring Orson Welles. The film follows the life and career of Charles Foster Kane, a newspaper magnate whose idealistic principles eventually lead to his public downfall. Through a series of flashbacks, the film explores Kane's complicated relationships with his first wife, Emily Monroe Norton, and his second wife, Susan Alexander Kane, as well as his business nemesis, Jedediah Leland, and his political nemesis, Boss Jim Gettys. As Kane's life unravels, the mystery of his famous last words, "Rosebud", deepens. The film was nominated for nine Academy Awards and won Best Writing (Original Screenplay). Its famous score and pioneering cinematography are renowned as classics of the film industry. It is widely considered to be one of the greatest films of all time.

Casino (1995)

Casino
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci, James Woods
Rated R

Casino is a 1995 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Sharon Stone. Set in 1970s Las Vegas, the film follows the story of Sam "Ace" Rothstein (De Niro), an ambitious casino executive who teams up with mob enforcer Nicky Santoro (Pesci) to run a successful casino, the Tangiers. Despite their success, their involvement with the mafia soon leads to tension and conflict, as Ace and Nicky battle for control of the casino and the city's criminal underworld. As the stakes become higher and the consequences more dangerous, Ace and Nicky's partnership is put to the test.

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There Will Be Blood
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Paul Thomas Anderson, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Paul Dano, Ciarán Hinds, Martin Stringer
Rated R

There Will Be Blood is a 2007 drama film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. The film follows the story of Daniel Plainview, a prospector who goes from humble beginnings to becoming a successful oilman. Plainview is driven by a relentless ambition to gain wealth and power, and he will stop at nothing to achieve it. Along the way, he clashes with a charismatic preacher, Eli Sunday, whose competing interests threaten Plainview's success. As the two men become increasingly hostile, Plainview's hunger for money and power leads to a violent and tragic climax.

Inside Job (2010)

Inside Job
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Charles Ferguson, starring Matt Damon, Gylfi Zoega, Andri Snær Magnason, Sigridur Benediktsdottir
Rated PG-13

Inside Job is an Academy Award-winning documentary film about the global financial crisis of 2008. Through interviews with key financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics, the film offers an in-depth look at the systemic corruption and greed that led to the crash and its devastating consequences. It reveals the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington, the lack of oversight of the financial industry, and the effects of deregulation on the global economy. The film ends with a call for tougher oversight and regulation of the industry, as well as an indictment of those responsible for the crisis. The film ultimately blames the economic meltdown on the deregulation of the financial industry and the lack of government oversight.

Network (1976)

Network
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Peter Finch, Robert Duvall
Rated R

Network is a 1976 satirical drama directed by Sidney Lumet. It follows the story of a news anchor, Howard Beale (played by Peter Finch), who gets fired from his job. In a desperate attempt to save his career, he announces on live television that he will commit suicide in a week. Instead, Beale's rant captivates the nation and he becomes a celebrity. As the ratings for his show skyrocket, a corporate executive, Arthur Jensen (played by Ned Beatty), takes advantage of the situation and uses Beale as a platform to push his own agenda. The film explores the power of television and how it can manipulate people and their opinions, as well as the effects of corporate greed and selfishness on the media. In the end, Beale is forced to confront the consequences of his decisions, and the film culminates in a powerful statement about the power of communication and the need for personal responsibility.

Gandhi (1982)

Gandhi
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Attenborough, starring Ben Kingsley, John Gielgud, Rohini Hattangadi, Roshan Seth
Rated PG

Gandhi is a 1982 biographical drama film based on the life of the Indian leader Mohandas K. Gandhi. Directed by Richard Attenborough and written by John Briley, the film stars Ben Kingsley as Gandhi, with Candice Bergen, Edward Fox, John Gielgud, Trevor Howard, John Mills, Martin Sheen, and Ian Charleson in supporting roles. The film follows Gandhi's life from his early years in South Africa to his ascent as the leader of the Indian independence movement and his eventual assassination by a Hindu extremist. It focuses on his non-violent civil disobedience campaign, the Salt March of 1930, and the various socio-political conflicts he had with the British Raj. Gandhi went on to become the most successful British biopic of all time, winning eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Kingsley. Its commercial and critical success was a major inspiration for other cinematic tributes to Gandhi, such as Lage Raho Munna Bhai (2006).

The King's Speech (2010)

The King's Speech
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tom Hooper, starring Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter, Derek Jacobi
Rated R

The King's Speech is a 2010 British historical drama film directed by Tom Hooper and written by David Seidler. Starring Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter, Guy Pearce and Claire Bloom, it follows the story of King George VI of the United Kingdom and his struggle to overcome his stammer with the help of speech therapist Lionel Logue. The film follows the life of King George VI, from his ascension to the throne after his brother’s abdication in 1936, through his struggle to overcome his speech impediment, to his eventual triumph in delivering a stirring radio address to the nation as Britain enters World War II in 1939. Through the help of his wife, Queen Elizabeth, and Logue, the King eventually learns to overcome his stammer and find his voice in time to inspire the nation through the war.

The Corporation (2003)

The Corporation
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Mark Achbar, Jennifer Abbott, starring Mikela Jay, Rob Beckwermert, Christopher Gora, Nina Jones
Rated Not Rated

The Corporation is a 2003 award-winning Canadian documentary film written by Joel Bakan and directed by Mark Achbar and Jennifer Abbott. The film examines the modern-day corporation, considering its legal status as a class of person and evaluating its behavior towards society and the world at large as a psychiatrist might evaluate an ordinary person. The documentary also highlights the social responsibility of corporations and the manner in which they are often unaccountable for their actions. The film is critical of corporate behavior, and seeks to expose corporate dominance in the face of public opinion. It features insights from various corporate critics and activists, including Michael Moore, Noam Chomsky, and Naomi Klein. The film was nominated for several awards and won numerous awards, including the Genie Award for Best Feature Documentary and the Don Haig Award.

The Pursuit of Happyness (2006)

The Pursuit of Happyness
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gabriele Muccino, starring Will Smith, Thandiwe Newton, Jaden Smith, Brian Howe
Rated PG-13

The Pursuit of Happyness is a 2006 drama film based on the true story of Chris Gardner, a single father who went from the depths of poverty to achieving great success. Chris is a struggling salesman who is unable to make ends meet on his low paying job. When his wife leaves him, Chris is left to care for their young son on his own. With the help of his son, Chris embarks on a journey of self-discovery and perseverance as he attempts to achieve success and make something of himself. Despite the odds, Chris manages to create a brighter future for himself and his son, showing that hope and determination can lead to a better life.

Mildred Pierce (1945)

Mildred Pierce
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Joan Crawford, Jack Carson, Zachary Scott, Eve Arden
Rated Approved

Mildred Pierce is a 1945 American film noir directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Joan Crawford. Set in 1930s Los Angeles, the story centers around Mildred Pierce, a single mother who is determined to build a better life for her two daughters. She starts a successful business, but her complicated relationship with her eldest daughter, Veda, threatens to undo all her hard work. Mildred finds her life further complicated when she falls in love with Monty, a charming but dishonest cad who seems to be after her money. As the story progresses, Mildred must confront her own troubled past and her own insecurities in order to save her family from ruin.

The Social Network (2010)

The Social Network
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Fincher, starring Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake, Rooney Mara
Rated PG-13

The Social Network is a 2010 biographical drama film directed by David Fincher and written by Aaron Sorkin. It stars Jesse Eisenberg as Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of the social networking website Facebook, along with Andrew Garfield as Eduardo Saverin, Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker, and Armie Hammer as the Winklevoss twins. The film chronicles the story of how Zuckerberg created the website which would become Facebook in 2003, from the moment he got the idea to the legal disputes which followed. The film follows the creation of Facebook from a Harvard student's idea to its eventual international success. The film also examines the consequences of its success and the impact it had on the relationships between the people involved.

The Man Who Would Be King (1975)

The Man Who Would Be King
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From John Huston, starring Sean Connery, Michael Caine, Christopher Plummer, Saeed Jaffrey
Rated PG

The Man Who Would Be King is a 1975 adventure film directed by John Huston, written by John Huston, John Huston Jr. and Gladys Hill, and based on the 1888 Rudyard Kipling novella of the same name. The film stars Sean Connery and Michael Caine as two British adventurers in 19th-century British India who become rulers of Kafiristan, a remote part of Afghanistan. The film follows the two men, Daniel Dravot and Peachy Carnehan, as they search for the legendary kingdom of Kafiristan, reach its capital, and are mistaken for gods. The two eventually become kings, only to face a revolt from the local people when they try to enforce their own code of justice on them. In the end, Dravot sacrifices himself for the sake of his people. The film was well-received upon its release and is considered a classic of adventure cinema.

The Insider (1999)

The Insider
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Michael Mann, starring Russell Crowe, Al Pacino, Christopher Plummer, Diane Venora
Rated R

The Insider is a 1999 American drama film directed by Michael Mann, starring Al Pacino and Russell Crowe. The film is based on a true story of Jeffrey Wigand, a former executive at the tobacco conglomerate Brown & Williamson, who spoke publicly in 1996 about the health risks of smoking. Wigand's decision to come forward with this information puts him in the crosshairs of the powerful tobacco company and its lawyers. Facing an onslaught of threats and intimidation, Wigand and his family must fight for their safety, as a 60 Minutes producer (played by Pacino) attempts to convince him to speak out on camera in an exclusive television interview. The film explores the ethical implications of Wigand's actions and shows the difficult choices he must make in order to protect his family and defend the truth.

American Gangster (2007)

American Gangster
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Ridley Scott, starring Denzel Washington, Russell Crowe, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Josh Brolin
Rated R

American Gangster is a 2007 biographical crime drama directed by Ridley Scott. The film tells the true story of Frank Lucas, an African American mob boss who smuggled heroin into the United States on American service planes returning from the Vietnam War. After rising to power in the 1970s Harlem drug trade, Lucas is eventually arrested by Detective Richie Roberts. Roberts is a dedicated lawman who risks his career to bring Lucas to justice. The film follows both men as their lives intersect and Lucas is forced to choose between his criminal lifestyle and his desire for redemption. Along the way, Lucas forms an unlikely alliance with Roberts, and the two men come to understand one another in the midst of their struggle with the law.

Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)

Glengarry Glen Ross
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James Foley, starring Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin, Alan Arkin
Rated R

Glengarry Glen Ross is a 1992 film directed by James Foley and based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning play of the same name by David Mamet. The film stars an ensemble cast including Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris and Kevin Spacey. The film follows four desperate Chicago real estate agents who are prepared to engage in any number of unethical, illegal acts—from lies and flattery to bribery, threats, intimidation and burglary—to sell undesirable real estate to unwitting prospective buyers. The agents are given one last chance to redeem themselves, which sets in motion a ruthless and desperate power struggle. With a bleak outlook and desperate for their jobs, the agents battle their own moral boundaries to survive in a business that rewards only the most cutthroat.

Office Space (1999)

Office Space
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Mike Judge, starring Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston, David Herman, Ajay Naidu
Rated R

Office Space is a 1999 comedy film written and directed by Mike Judge. It follows the story of Peter Gibbons (Ron Livingston), a disillusioned corporate employee who is struggling to make ends meet while counting down the days at his monotonous desk job. After being hypnotized by a hypnotherapist he decides to break free from the monotony of his job and seek a more meaningful life. With the help of his friends, Peter stands up to the oppressive management of his employer and attempts to shake up the corporate world. Along the way, Peter learns to appreciate the absurdities of life and take joy in the simple pleasures of life. Ultimately, Peter shows the power of standing up for one’s rights and making a difference in the world.

Man on Wire (2008)

Man on Wire
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James Marsh, starring Philippe Petit, Jean François Heckel, Jean-Louis Blondeau, Annie Allix
Rated PG-13

Man on Wire is a documentary film that follows the incredible story of Philippe Petit, a French high-wire artist who, in 1974, achieved what many considered impossible - walking a tightrope suspended between the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. Through archival footage, contemporary interviews and recreations of the event, this film tells the story of Petit's daring feat and the people who helped him accomplish it. The film chronicles Petit's daring plan and the weeks of intense preparation he and his team went through in order to pull off the stunt. The film follows Petit's journey from his humble beginnings in France to the iconic moment when he stepped out into a void between the two towers. It is a story of ambition, passion and dedication, and how Petit was able to turn his dream into a reality.

127 Hours (2010)

127 Hours
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Danny Boyle, starring James Franco, Amber Tamblyn, Kate Mara, Sean Bott
Rated R

127 Hours is a 2010 biographical survival drama film directed by Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle. The film is based on the true story of Aron Ralston, a mountain climber who became trapped in a remote canyon in Utah in April 2003 and had to amputate his own arm to free himself. The film follows Ralston (played by James Franco), as he attempts to free himself from his predicament. He reflects on his past, his relationships, and experiences flashbacks to the events that led him to this point, including his failed attempts to seek help from other hikers. In the end, he is forced to make the life-changing decision to amputate his arm to escape the canyon. The film was a critical and commercial success, earning numerous awards and nominations, including six Academy Award nominations. The film is a powerful and emotional story of survival, resilience, and determination.

 



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