Top 100 Movies Of All Time Afi

Updated
Top 100 Movies Of All Time Afi

Have you heard these Top 100 Movies Of All Time Afi? We know you'll find some new films. Here are 25 of our favorites.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

The Shawshank Redemption
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton, William Sadler
Rated R

The Shawshank Redemption is a 1994 American drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont, based on the 1982 Stephen King novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. The film stars Tim Robbins as Andy Dufresne, a banker who is sentenced to life in Shawshank State Penitentiary for the murder of his wife and her lover, despite his claims of innocence. While in prison, he befriends a fellow inmate, Ellis Redding (Morgan Freeman), and finds himself protected by the guards after the warden begins using him in his money-laundering operation. As Andy's friendship with Red grows, he eventually gains the courage to plot his escape, leading to one of the most uplifting and powerful endings in cinematic history.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather tells the story of the Corleone crime family, a powerful and influential Italian-American gangster family. Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando) is the head of the family, and along with his sons Michael (Al Pacino), Sonny (James Caan), and Fredo (John Cazale), he oversees their business interests. The plot follows the family's attempts to protect their business and family from rival gangs, including the Sicilian mafia and the rival Five Families. As the story progresses, Michael takes over the family business and seeks to expand their empire. Along the way, he must grapple with his own conscience and personal morality, as he is forced to make difficult decisions to preserve the well-being of the Corleone family.

Schindler's List (1993)

Schindler's List
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, Caroline Goodall
Rated R

Schindler's List is a movie directed by Steven Spielberg and released in 1993. It tells the incredible true story of Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of over 1,200 Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. After witnessing the horror of the Nazi regime and its persecution of the Jews, Schindler risks his own life to protect his workers and arranges for them to be secretly transferred to safe locations. The movie is an emotional and inspiring story of courage and hope in the face of unimaginable darkness.

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather Part II is the sequel to the classic 1972 film The Godfather. It continues the saga of the powerful Italian-American Corleone crime family, headed by patriarch Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando). Vito's son Michael (Al Pacino) has now taken charge of the family business and is struggling to maintain a balance between his family and his criminal enterprise. The film follows Michael in his attempts to expand the family's influence and make his mark on the world. At the same time, it follows the story of Vito's younger years in Sicily and New York, where he rises to power and experiences the challenges of his new life. The film features some of the most memorable and iconic scenes in cinematic history, and is widely considered to be one of the greatest sequels of all time.

12 Angry Men (1957)

12 Angry Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Martin Balsam, John Fiedler
Rated Approved

12 Angry Men is a classic courtroom drama about a jury of twelve men who are unable to unanimously agree on a verdict of guilt or innocence for a young man accused of murdering his father. Despite the seemingly overwhelming evidence, one juror, Juror 8 (Henry Fonda) is convinced of the defendant’s innocence and sets out to convince the other eleven men of his point of view. Through a series of hard-fought arguments, Juror 8 slowly begins to sway the opinions of the other jurors and ultimately succeeds in making them see the possibility of reasonable doubt. As the tension mounts, the twelve men must ultimately decide the fate of the accused.

Pulp Fiction (1994)

Pulp Fiction
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Quentin Tarantino, starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis
Rated R

Pulp Fiction is an American black comedy crime film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino. A story of two mob hitmen, a boxer, a gangster's wife and a pair of diner bandits intertwine in four tales of violence and redemption. The lives of these seemingly unrelated people are woven together in a nonlinear narrative that spans four different points in time. The movie is filled with iconic characters, sharp dialogue and stylized violence that has become synonymous with Tarantino's work. It earned a place in the National Film Registry for its cultural and historical significance. Pulp Fiction received numerous accolades, including seven Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, and won Best Original Screenplay.

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Peter Jackson, starring Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Orlando Bloom, Sean Bean
Rated PG-13

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a 2001 epic fantasy adventure film directed by Peter Jackson, based on the first volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. The story follows a group of hobbits, elves, men, dwarves, and a wizard as they attempt to destroy the One Ring and defeat the Dark Lord Sauron. Led by the hobbit Frodo Baggins, the fellowship journeys across Middle-earth in an attempt to save the world from Sauron's evil. Along the way, they must face treacherous foes such as orcs, trolls, and the ringwraiths, as well as difficult choices concerning what is right and wrong. They also gain valuable allies, such as the wizard Gandalf and the elf Aragorn, who helps to lead them to the ultimate confrontation with Sauron at Mount Doom. The film was a major success, both critically and commercially, and won numerous awards, including four Academy Awards for Best Cinematography, Best Visual Effects, Best Makeup, and Best Original Score.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Eric Roth. The film stars Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, and Sally Field. The story follows the life of Forrest Gump (Hanks), a naive and slow-witted but kind-hearted man from Alabama who witnesses, and in some cases influences, some of the defining events of the latter half of the 20th century in the United States. As Forrest interacts with historical figures, from presidents to John Lennon, he experiences firsthand their influences on his life. The film follows Forrest's journey through life as he deals with his mother's death, serves in the Vietnam War, and falls in love with Jenny (Wright). During his journey, Forrest's outlook on life is formed and his innocence, honesty, and optimism influence the lives of those around him. The film won several awards, including six Oscars and a Golden Globe for Best Picture.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman and based on the 1962 novel by Ken Kesey. It stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a criminal who feigns insanity to serve a short prison sentence in an asylum, and Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratched, the cruel and oppressive head nurse of the mental institution. The film follows McMurphy as he clashes with the authoritarian Nurse Ratched, and eventually rallies the other inmates to take control of the asylum. The film's themes include individuality, institutional oppression, mental health, and civil rights. It won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor for Nicholson, Best Actress for Fletcher, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Goodfellas (1990)

Goodfellas
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci, Lorraine Bracco
Rated R

Goodfellas is an American crime film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the memoir Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi. It stars Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci, Lorraine Bracco, Paul Sorvino, and Frank Vincent. It follows the story of Henry Hill, a young Italian-American living in 1950s New York City, as he rises through the ranks of the Italian-American mob. Henry is mentored by Jimmy Conway and Tommy DeVito, two veteran gangsters, and eventually rises to a powerful position in the Mafia. Along the way, he struggles to keep his marriage and family together, while also balancing his double life of crime and violence. The film follows Henry and his friends as they engage in a series of increasingly shocking and violent criminal acts, culminating in a brutal climax.

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977)

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From George Lucas, starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Alec Guinness
Rated PG

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope is a 1977 science fiction space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. Set nineteen years after the formation of the Galactic Empire, the film follows a farm boy named Luke Skywalker who joins forces with a Jedi Knight, a cocky pilot, a wookiee and two droids to save the galaxy from the Empire's world-destroying battle station, while also attempting to rescue Princess Leia from the mysterious Darth Vader. Along the way, Luke Skywalker learns the ways of the Jedi, makes new friends, and finds true love. The fate of the galaxy hangs in the balance as the Rebel Alliance and the Empire battle for control of the Death Star.

It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

It's a Wonderful Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Capra, starring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Thomas Mitchell
Rated PG

It's a Wonderful Life is a classic Christmas movie about George Bailey, a man who has given up his dreams of personal advancement and travel to remain in his small hometown of Bedford Falls to help his family and neighbors. After a series of unfortunate events, George becomes desperate and contemplates suicide on Christmas Eve. At the very moment of despair, an angel named Clarence appears and shows George how different life would have been if he had never been born. Through this eye-opening experience, George learns to appreciate his life and comes to understand that he is indeed a very lucky man. With the help of his friends and family, George is able to overcome his troubles and ultimately find peace and joy during the holidays. It's a Wonderful Life is a heartwarming reminder to be grateful for what we have and to remember that every life is indeed a wonderful life.

Saving Private Ryan (1998)

Saving Private Ryan
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore, Edward Burns
Rated R

Saving Private Ryan tells the story of a group of eight U.S. Army Rangers led by Captain John H. Miller (Tom Hanks) who are sent on a suicide mission to locate and bring home Private First Class James Francis Ryan (Matt Damon). The mission is made even more urgent when it is discovered that Ryan is the last surviving brother of four servicemen killed in action. The Rangers face a number of obstacles on their journey, including intense enemy firefights, an unforgiving terrain, and the burden of knowing that their mission could very well be a suicide mission. Despite these setbacks, the men persevere and ultimately succeed in rescuing Ryan. In the end, the Rangers are left with a powerful reminder of the cost of war and an appreciation for the courage and sacrifice of their fallen comrades.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

The Silence of the Lambs
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Jonathan Demme, starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney, Kasi Lemmons
Rated R

The Silence of the Lambs is a psychological horror-thriller film directed by Jonathan Demme, based on Thomas Harris' novel of the same name. The story follows FBI trainee Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster), as she attempts to track down a serial killer known as "Buffalo Bill" (Ted Levine). With the help of Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins), a brilliant but dangerous former psychiatrist, Clarice works to unravel the mystery of the killer's identity and motivations. Through her journey, she is forced to confront her own fears and the dark secrets of her past. The film was a critical and commercial success and won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Casablanca (1942)

Casablanca
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains
Rated PG

Casablanca is a romantic drama set during World War II. The story follows Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), a cynical American who runs a nightclub in the Moroccan city of Casablanca. When two former lovers, Ilsa Lund (Ingrid Bergman) and Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid), arrive in Casablanca, Rick is forced to confront his past and the choices he must make for his future. The film follows their intersecting paths as Rick struggles to decide between his own ambitions, his love for Ilsa, and helping Laszlo escape from the Nazis. The film is a tale of love, loyalty, and sacrifice set against a tense backdrop of political intrigue, and ultimately culminates in a bittersweet ending for its characters.

City Lights (1931)

City Lights
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Charles Chaplin, starring Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Florence Lee, Harry Myers
Rated G

City Lights is a romantic comedy silent film directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. The movie centers around a Tramp (Chaplin) who falls in love with a beautiful blind girl (Virginia Cherrill) who mistakes him for a wealthy man. The Tramp tries to find a way to earn money to pay for an operation to restore the girl's sight. Through a series of comedic and heartfelt scenarios, the Tramp eventually saves the girl. With his generous gift, the girl is able to see again, and the Tramp and the girl can finally be together. City Lights is a timeless classic that offers a unique blend of comedy and emotion.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a 1960 horror-thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It stars Anthony Perkins as the disturbed and lonely Norman Bates, Janet Leigh as Marion Crane, and Vera Miles as her sister Lila. The film follows Marion, a young woman on the run from the law, who checks into the Bates Motel, run by the young Bates. As Marion's stay at the motel progresses, it becomes clear that Norman has an unhealthy obsession with his mother and a dark past, which leads to a shocking conclusion. Psycho is widely considered to be one of Hitchcock's greatest works, and is considered one of the most influential films in the horror genre.

Apocalypse Now (1979)

Apocalypse Now
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Frederic Forrest
Rated R

Apocalypse Now is an epic war film set during the Vietnam War and follows the journey of Army Special Forces Captain Benjamin Willard who is sent to Cambodia on a top-secret mission to assassinate Colonel Walter Kurtz, a renegade officer who has gone insane and started a cult. Along the way, Willard comes face to face with the horrors of war and his own demons. The film is a powerful exploration of the darkness and madness of war, and the moral ambiguity of the Vietnam conflict.

Rear Window (1954)

Rear Window
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter
Rated PG

Rear Window is a classic 1954 American suspense thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Jimmy Stewart, Grace Kelly, and Wendell Corey. The movie follows the story of a wheelchair-bound photographer, L.B. Jefferies (Stewart), who passes the time by watching his neighbors in the rear courtyard of his apartment building. When Jefferies begins to suspect that one of his neighbors may have committed a murder, he enlists the help of his girlfriend Lisa Fremont (Kelly) to investigate. Together, they must race against time to uncover the truth before it’s too late. The film is widely regarded as one of Hitchcock’s best works and helped set the standard for suspense films in the years to come.

Modern Times (1936)

Modern Times
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Charles Chaplin, starring Charles Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Henry Bergman, Tiny Sandford
Rated G

Modern Times is a 1936 silent comedy film directed, written, and produced by Charlie Chaplin. In it, Chaplin's iconic Little Tramp character attempts to survive in a modern, industrialized world. After being released from a factory job, he has numerous misadventures with a young woman (Paulette Goddard) and eventually finds a job as a singing waiter in a night club. Throughout the film, Chaplin pokes fun at the struggles of the working class during the Great Depression. The film also explores themes of technology and automation, as the Little Tramp character is nearly driven mad by a mechanical feeding device at the factory where he works. Despite being a silent film, Modern Times is full of memorable moments and is considered one of Chaplin's most successful works.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn
Rated PG

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a classic 1964 black comedy directed by Stanley Kubrick. It follows a group of military and political personnel as they try to prevent a nuclear apocalypse. After a deranged American general launches a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union, a group of experts, including the titular Dr. Strangelove (Peter Sellers), attempt to stop the impending destruction. Along the way, they confront a variety of issues, including sexual preferences, political ideals, and the dangers of technology. The film is a satirical look at the Cold War and the potential for the destruction of mankind at the hands of a few men. The dark humor and striking visuals combine to create an unforgettable cinematic experience.

Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)

Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman, John Rhys-Davies
Rated PG

Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark is a 1981 American action-adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg, written by Lawrence Kasdan, and executive produced by George Lucas. The film stars Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones, Karen Allen as Marion Ravenwood, Paul Freeman as French archaeologist René Belloq, and Ronald Lacey as Major Arnold Toht. Set in 1936, Indiana Jones is hired by the U.S. government to recover the Ark of the Covenant from the Nazis, who intend to use it to gain supernatural powers that will help them in their quest for world domination. Indiana Jones embarks on a thrilling adventure that pits him against the Nazis and his old nemesis René Belloq, and culminates in a spectacular climactic battle on an island in the Mediterranean Sea. Along the way, he befriends Marion and must use wits and guile to outsmart his enemies and save the day.

Citizen Kane (1941)

Citizen Kane
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Orson Welles, starring Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore, Agnes Moorehead
Rated PG

Citizen Kane tells the story of Charles Foster Kane, a powerful and influential newspaper tycoon whose mysterious death leads a reporter to investigate the meaning behind his last word: “Rosebud.” Through a series of flashbacks, the audience learns of Kane’s life story, from his early years as an orphan, to his rise to wealth and power, to his eventual downfall. The film explores themes of power, loneliness, and the corrupting influence of money. Orson Welles’ direction and performance as Kane, along with the groundbreaking cinematography and innovative editing techniques, make Citizen Kane one of the most influential films of all time.

Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Singin' in the Rain
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Jean Hagen
Rated G

Singin' in the Rain is a classic musical film set in 1920s Hollywood. It follows the story of Don Lockwood, a silent-movie star, whose life is thrown into chaos as the movie industry transitions to talking pictures. Don must team up with his singing partner, Lina Lamont, and an aspiring actress, Kathy Seldon, to create the talkie version of their latest hit movie. Along the way, Don and Kathy fall in love, and the three must find a way to make it all work. Along the way, there are infectious musical numbers and classic comedy scenes. The film is a lighthearted look at the transition from silent film to sound that is still beloved today.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Lawrence of Arabia
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lean, starring Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins
Rated Approved

Lawrence of Arabia is a classic epic historical drama directed by David Lean. It tells the story of T.E. Lawrence, a British army officer who helped unite Arab tribes in a revolt against the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Lawrence's journey begins as an inexperienced soldier sent to the Middle East to conduct a survey of the region. He soon finds himself leading a ragtag army of Bedouin tribesmen in a daring guerrilla campaign against the Turks. Along the way, Lawrence must confront his own inner demons while struggling to remain loyal to both the British and Arab forces. With extraordinary cinematography and a timeless score, Lawrence of Arabia is an unforgettable cinematic experience.

 



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