Surealism Film

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Surealism Film

Dozens of directors have explored Surealism Film. We found 20 of the top ones.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. It follows the life of Alex DeLarge, a charismatic, psychopathic delinquent whose pleasures are classical music, rape, and what is termed "ultra-violence". He is arrested and sentenced to 14 years in prison. After two years, he volunteers for a controversial treatment which is intended to reduce his violent behavior. He is released back into society, where his innate violent tendencies manifest once again. He must choose between his personal freedom and the greater good of society. The film contains ultra-violence, rape, and dark humor, and has generated much controversy over the years.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

"2001: A Space Odyssey" is a 1968 science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick. The film follows a voyage to Jupiter with the sentient computer HAL after the discovery of a mysterious black monolith affecting human evolution. The film is noted for its scientific accuracy and visual effects, and features minimal dialogue in contrast to its soundtrack. The film is often described as one of the greatest and most influential films ever made and is widely considered to be a landmark work in the history of science fiction. The film was awarded the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 American psychological drama film directed by Darren Aronofsky and starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, and Marlon Wayans. The film depicts four characters who become dependent on drugs in order to cope with the harsh realities of their lives. Through a series of interconnected stories, the film follows the lives of the characters Sarah, Harry, Marion and Tyrone as they succumb to their addictions and the desperate measures they take to try and feed their habits. The film is a bleak and vivid portrayal of the damaging effects of drug addiction and the desperation it drives people to. It challenges viewers to think about the consequences of drug use, and serves as a powerful warning against it.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 romantic science-fiction comedy-drama film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Michel Gondry. The film follows a couple, Joel (Jim Carrey) and Clementine (Kate Winslet), as they undergo a procedure to erase each other from their memories. As their memories are erased, the couple reflects on their relationship and ultimately decide to start anew. Along the way, Joel discovers how deep his love for Clementine really is and that some memories are worth keeping. The film was praised for its original screenplay and its use of nonlinear narrative. The film was nominated for several awards, including the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.

Amélie (2001)

Amélie
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Pierre Jeunet, starring Audrey Tautou, Mathieu Kassovitz, Rufus, Lorella Cravotta
Rated R

Amélie is a 2001 French romantic comedy-drama film directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. The story follows Amélie Poulain (Audrey Tautou), an eccentric and shy romantic who decides to help those around her and along the way discovers love. Set in Montmartre, Paris, Amélie embarks on a quest to make the people around her happy while trying to find her own happiness. Along the way, she meets a variety of characters, including a romantic interest named Nino Quincampoix (Mathieu Kassovitz). The film follows Amélie on her journey as she discovers the power of human connection and emotion.

The Seventh Seal (1957)

The Seventh Seal
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Max von Sydow, Gunnar Björnstrand, Bengt Ekerot, Nils Poppe
Rated Not Rated

The Seventh Seal is a 1957 film by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. Set during the height of the Black Plague in medieval Sweden, the film follows the journey of a knight and his squire, who are on their way home after a decade of fighting in the Crusades. Along the way, the knight encounters Death, who challenges him to a game of chess, in which the knight's life is at stake. The knight agrees, and as they play, the two discuss life, death, and the meaning of existence. Along the way, they encounter a variety of characters who, like the knight, are struggling to make sense of their lives and their impending mortality, as the plague ravages their land. In the end, the knight finds spiritual enlightenment, and his journey is both heartbreaking and inspiring.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is an avant-garde psychological drama directed by Ingmar Bergman in 1966. It tells the story of Elisabet, an actress who has inexplicably gone mute, and her nurse Alma, who is assigned to care for her. As the film progresses, the two women form an intense bond, and Alma slowly begins to reveal her own inner turmoil, leading to a complex exploration of identity, alienation, and the power of communication. Through the use of carefully plotted symbolism and imagery, Bergman examines the deeply interconnected relationship between two individuals and the psychological implications of their enigmatic bond. The film culminates in a powerful, thought-provoking conclusion that leaves viewers with lingering questions about the ultimate nature of identity and communication.

Mulholland Drive (2001)

Mulholland Drive
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Jeanne Bates
Rated R

Mulholland Drive is a neo-noir mystery film directed by David Lynch and written by Lynch and co-writer Mary Sweeney. It stars Naomi Watts, Laura Harring and Justin Theroux. The plot follows an aspiring actress named Betty Elms who arrives in Los Angeles and meets an amnesiac woman with whom she embarks on a search for identity and the truth behind a mysterious film noir-style plot. The film was critically acclaimed and nominated for several awards, including the Palme d'Or at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival. It is widely regarded as one of Lynch's finest works, and has been described as "a surreal dreamscape of a film".

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Fernando Rey, Delphine Seyrig, Paul Frankeur, Bulle Ogier
Rated PG

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a surrealist comedy by Spanish director Luis Buñuel. The film follows the exploits of eight upper-class friends as they attempt to eat dinner together, but are constantly thwarted by a variety of interruptions. As their increasingly bizarre attempts to dine together are continually thwarted, the characters find themselves in a surreal dream-like state, in which they are continually transplanted into various settings and situations, encountering various people and events. Throughout the course of the film, the characters’ lives become increasingly intertwined, as the dream-like sequences gradually become more and more disconnected from reality. By the end of the film, the characters’ attempts to eat dinner together are still unsuccessful, yet they remain unfazed by the bizarre events that have transpired around them. Ultimately, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a satire on the complacency and hypocrisy of the wealthy, as well as a surreal exploration of the human condition.

Being John Malkovich (1999)

Being John Malkovich
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, John Malkovich
Rated R

Being John Malkovich is a 1999 dark comedy-fantasy film directed by Spike Jonze and written by Charlie Kaufman. It follows a puppeteer, Craig Schwartz (John Cusack), who discovers a portal into the mind of actor John Malkovich (played by himself). The portal leads to an alternate reality, where Craig finds himself in Malkovich's body for 15 minutes. He soon discovers that others are using the portal for their own gain, and he must find a way to break out and reclaim his own identity. The film explores themes of identity, celebrity, and the power of manipulation. It also features a star-studded cast including Catherine Keener, Cameron Diaz, Orson Bean, and Charlie Sheen.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014)

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Alejandro G. Iñárritu, starring Michael Keaton, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Andrea Riseborough
Rated R

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) is a dark comedy drama that follows the story of Riggan Thomson, a once-famous actor best known for his portrayal of the superhero Birdman. Riggan has been struggling to reclaim his past celebrity and artistic credibility by writing, directing and starring in a Broadway play based on a Raymond Carver short story. Along the way, he is met with opposition from his cast, his daughter, and his own inner voice. His attempts to regain his former glory come to a head in an epic battle between art and ego, with the future of his career and family hanging in the balance.

Blue Velvet (1986)

Blue Velvet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Laura Dern
Rated R

Blue Velvet is a 1986 American neo-noir mystery film written and directed by David Lynch. The film stars Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, and Laura Dern. The plot follows Jeffrey Beaumont, a young man who discovers a severed human ear in a field while walking home from his high school. After taking the ear to the police, Jeffrey follows its trail into the seedy underworld of his small town and discovers a disturbed nightclub singer, Dorothy Vallens, who is being terrorized by a psychotic criminal, Frank Booth. Jeffrey's relationship with Dorothy and his efforts to solve the mystery of the ear become increasingly bizarre, as he descends deeper into the criminal underworld of the town. The film is noted for its dreamlike visuals, nightmarish atmosphere, and its exploration of sexual and violent themes.

Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Eyes Wide Shut
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Todd Field, Sydney Pollack
Rated R

Eyes Wide Shut is a 1999 drama-mystery film directed, produced and co-written by Stanley Kubrick. It stars Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman as a married couple whose relationship is tested when the husband discovers that his wife had contemplated having an affair. The film follows their quest as they unravel the secrets of a mysterious secret society and its rituals. Along the way, they find themselves in a web of deceit, betrayal, and danger as they struggle to make sense of their lives and their relationship. The film was Kubrick's final work before his death in 1999.

Spellbound (1945)

Spellbound
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll
Rated Approved

Spellbound is a psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, released in 1945. It tells the story of Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman), who works at a psychiatric hospital, and her relationship with the mysterious Dr. Anthony Edwardes (Gregory Peck), the new director of the hospital. As their relationship develops, Constance begins to realize that Edwardes might not be who he says he is. With the help of her colleague, Dr. Brulov (Michael Chekhov), Constance discovers that Edwardes is suffering from an amnesia-induced identity crisis, and may actually be an escaped murderer. With the help of a psychoanalyst (Leo G. Carroll), Constance works to uncover the truth and help Edwardes.

Pi (1998)

Pi
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Sean Gullette, Mark Margolis, Ben Shenkman, Pamela Hart
Rated R

Suspiria (1977)

Suspiria
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Dario Argento, starring Jessica Harper, Stefania Casini, Flavio Bucci, Miguel Bosé
Rated R

Eraserhead (1977)

Eraserhead
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Jack Nance, Charlotte Stewart, Allen Joseph, Jeanne Bates
Rated Not Rated

The Fountain (2006)

The Fountain
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Hugh Jackman, Rachel Weisz, Sean Patrick Thomas, Ellen Burstyn
Rated PG-13

Enemy (2013)

Enemy
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Denis Villeneuve, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Mélanie Laurent, Sarah Gadon, Isabella Rossellini
Rated R

Mother! (2017)

Mother!
★★★★
★★★★
2.6 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, Michelle Pfeiffer
Rated R

 



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