Movies In The 70s

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Movies In The 70s

For Movies In The 70s, there is no limit to the directors exploring this idea. Here are 25 of the top ones.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy, based on Mario Puzo's best-selling novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the patriarch and youngest son of the Corleone crime family. The story, spanning 1945 to 1955, chronicles the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone, focusing on the transformation of his son Michael from reluctant family outsider to ruthless Mafia boss. The film chronicles the Corleones' tumultuous rise to power, their struggle to hold onto it, and the eventual disintegration of the family after Michael's death. Despite the numerous awards and accolades it has received, the film has been criticized for its portrayal of the Mafia. Nevertheless, The Godfather is still considered by many to be one of the greatest films ever made and its legacy continues today.

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather Part II is the 1974 American crime drama film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and co-written with Mario Puzo. It is both a sequel and a prequel to The Godfather, presenting parallel dramas: one picks up the 1958 story of Michael Corleone (Al Pacino), the new Don of the Corleone crime family, while the prequel covers the journey of his father, Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro), from his Sicilian childhood to the founding of his family enterprise in New York City. The film follows the Corleone family's business dealings, as well as its struggles with the rival criminal organization, the Five Families. It also explores the corruption of government and law enforcement, as the Corleones rise to power and influence. As the film progresses, Michael attempts to expand the family business into Las Vegas, Hollywood, and Cuba, while facing opposition from the government, rival mobsters, and even his own family. Part II also introduces the character of young Vito Corleone in flashbacks, as he immigrates to the United States and rises to become a powerful crime boss. The film earned eleven Academy Award nominations and won six, including Best Picture

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman and based on the 1962 novel by Ken Kesey. It stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a criminal who is sent to an insane asylum where he clashes with the tyrannical Nurse Ratched. The film is set in the 1960s and explores themes of rebellion against authority, individualism, and freedom of expression. With its dark comedic elements, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is considered one of the greatest films of all time and won the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, and Best Screenplay.

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977)

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From George Lucas, starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Alec Guinness
Rated PG

Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope is a 1977 American epic space-opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first installment of the original Star Wars trilogy, and stars Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, and Alec Guinness. The plot follows Luke Skywalker's quest to aid the Rebel Alliance in its fight against the Galactic Empire, and to discover the truth of his father's identity. Along the way, he meets Obi-Wan Kenobi, Han Solo, and Princess Leia, and together they battle the Empire, culminating in a climactic battle on the Death Star. After destroying the Death Star, Luke and his friends celebrate the victory, and the movie ends with a celebration of the Rebel Alliance.

Apocalypse Now (1979)

Apocalypse Now
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Frederic Forrest
Rated R

Apocalypse Now is a 1979 epic war film directed, produced and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola. Set during the Vietnam War, the film follows Captain Benjamin Willard, an American soldier tasked with assassinating the renegade Colonel Kurtz, who has declared himself a god-like leader in a remote area of Cambodia near the border of Laos. Along the way, Willard encounters a series of strange and chaotic events, including a treacherous boat journey upriver and a brutal air combat. His mission takes an ever-darkening turn as he delves deeper into the Colonel's world of madness and violence. The film is an exploration of the darkness of the human soul, and an indictment of war and of a society that turns a blind eye to its destruction.

The Sting (1973)

The Sting
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From George Roy Hill, starring Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw, Charles Durning
Rated PG

The Sting is a 1973 American caper film set in 1936 that tells the story of a pair of grifters, Johnny Hooker (Robert Redford) and Henry Gondorff (Paul Newman), who seek to avenge the death of a friend by taking revenge on the crime boss responsible. The film follows the two as they devise a complex and daring con to trick the mobster into handing over a large sum of money. With the help of a grifter, Luther Coleman (Robert Earl Jones), and a corrupt lawyer, Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw), they put their plan into action. Featuring compelling performances, snappy dialogue, and an iconic score by Marvin Hamlisch, The Sting is an Academy Award-winning classic that stands as one of the best examples of the con artist genre.

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks
Rated R

Taxi Driver is a 1976 psychological thriller directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Paul Schrader. It stars Robert De Niro as Travis Bickle, a lonely, mentally unstable Vietnam War veteran who works as a night-time taxi driver in New York City. As he drives through the city, he becomes increasingly disgusted with the immorality he witnesses and struggles to make sense of his place in the world. Feeling isolated and rejected by society, Travis begins to develop a violent plan for revenge. In the end, he is driven to a place of redemption.

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

Monty Python and the Holy Grail
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones, starring Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Gilliam
Rated PG

Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 British comedy film directed by Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones. It is a parody of the Arthurian legend and stars the members of the Monty Python comedy group (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Eric Idle, Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin) as King Arthur and his knights in their search for the Holy Grail. Along the way, the knights encounter ridiculous obstacles such as a coconut-clopping knight, a killer rabbit, and the Knights who say "Ni!" The film also features classic Monty Python sketches, including a three-headed giant, a killer rabbit, and a castle full of killer, killer rabbits. The film also features cameos from other British comedy stars, including Connie Booth and Carol Cleveland. The film is an irreverent take on the Arthurian legend and is often cited as one of the best comedies of all time.

Chinatown (1974)

Chinatown
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, John Huston, Perry Lopez
Rated R

Chinatown is a 1974 neo-noir mystery film directed by Roman Polanski and starring Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, and John Huston. The film follows private investigator Jake Gittes (Nicholson) as he investigates a complex web of deception and corruption in 1930s Los Angeles. Gittes is hired by Evelyn Mulwray (Dunaway) to investigate her husband, but his investigation leads him to uncover a larger conspiracy involving water rights and city corruption. The investigation leads him to a powerful and dangerous family dynasty headed by Noah Cross (Huston). Gittes must unravel the mystery to save the city and his own life.

The Exorcist (1973)

The Exorcist
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From William Friedkin, starring Ellen Burstyn, Max von Sydow, Linda Blair, Lee J. Cobb
Rated R

The Exorcist is a 1973 supernatural horror film directed by William Friedkin, based on the 1971 novel of the same name written by William Peter Blatty. The film follows young Regan MacNeil, who is possessed by a demonic entity. A priest is called in to perform an exorcism, risking his own life in the process. After a series of spiritual and physical battles, the priest is successful in freeing Regan from the demonic presence. The film is widely considered one of the greatest horror films of all time, and has spawned several sequels and prequels.

Life of Brian (1979)

Life of Brian
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Jones, starring Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam
Rated R

Life of Brian is a Monty Python comedy classic directed by Terry Jones. Set in Biblical times, the film follows the story of Brian Cohen, a young man born in a stable next door to the one in which Jesus Christ is born. As a result of a series of comical events, Brian is mistaken for a messiah and gathers a group of devoted followers. After a series of increasingly absurd events, Brian is eventually arrested and sentenced to death by crucifixion. However, the film ends in a twist as Brian is mistaken for someone else and, in a classic Monty Python fashion, is released. Along the way, the film pokes fun at biblical stories, religion, and the idea of a messiah with its characteristic humor.

Annie Hall (1977)

Annie Hall
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Woody Allen, starring Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Carol Kane
Rated PG

Annie Hall is a classic romantic comedy directed by Woody Allen. It follows the story of Alvy Singer, a neurotic, aspiring stand-up comic, and Annie Hall, an aspiring singer and actress. Alvy falls in love with the strong-willed Annie, but due to the pressures of fame, their relationship falls apart. This leads to Alvy's existential crisis as he attempts to come to terms with the loss of his relationship. Along the way, we are treated to a variety of comedic set pieces and conversations between Alvy and his friends. The film features many of Allen's signature themes such as neuroses, relationships, and mortality. In the end, Alvy learns to accept the loss of his relationship and move on with his life.

Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Dog Day Afternoon
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Al Pacino, John Cazale, Penelope Allen, Sully Boyar
Rated R

Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 crime drama directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Al Pacino. The film follows Sonny Wortzik, a desperate man who attempts to rob a Brooklyn bank in order to pay for his lover's gender confirmation surgery. His plan quickly goes awry, as the bank employees and customers are held hostage and Sonny is forced to deal with the police and the ever-growing crowd of spectators outside the bank. The film is based on a true story, and depicts the events of the robbery and its aftermath in a realistic and gripping manner. As the film progresses, Sonny finds himself facing an increasingly desperate situation, with the possibility of a tragedy looming over everyone. The film examines the themes of friendship, loyalty, and desperation in a thought-provoking and touching way, and has become a classic of the crime genre.

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970)

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Elio Petri, starring Gian Maria Volontè, Florinda Bolkan, Gianni Santuccio, Orazio Orlando
Rated R

Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion is a 1970 Italian political thriller film directed by Elio Petri. It stars Gian Maria Volonté as a police inspector who commits an unpunishable crime so that he can prove his superiority over the law. The film follows the inspector's descent into obsession as he attempts to outsmart the police department and display that he is, indeed, above suspicion. Along the way, he discovers the nature of justice and power, and the corruption and abuse of power that often accompany it. His investigation brings him into contact with people from all levels of Italian society, from the impoverished to the powerful, and he is ultimately faced with the difficult decision between justice and revenge. In the end, the inspector learns that true justice and freedom can never be attained through the abuse of power.

Manhattan (1979)

Manhattan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Woody Allen, starring Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, Michael Murphy
Rated R

Manhattan is a 1979 comedy-drama film directed by Woody Allen and starring Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, and Michael Murphy. The story revolves around a twice-divorced, 42-year-old comedy writer, Isaac Davis (Allen) who is dating a 17-year-old girl, Tracy (Hemingway). Isaac's best friend, Yale (Murphy), is dating Isaac's ex-wife, Mary (Keaton). As the relationships between these four characters become more complex, Isaac learns that the decision to pursue a romance with Tracy is a decision that will forever alter his life. Along the way, he experiences a range of emotions from joy to frustration, often accompanied by his amusing observations on life. The film ends on a note of hope and optimism for the future.

All the President's Men (1976)

All the President's Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Alan J. Pakula, starring Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam
Rated PG

All the President's Men is a 1976 American political thriller film directed by Alan J. Pakula. The film tells the story of Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, their investigation into the Watergate scandal, and their eventual discovery of the involvement of numerous government officials in the ensuing cover-up. The film stars Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Woodward and Bernstein, respectively. It also features an ensemble cast including Jason Robards, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, Hal Holbrook, and Ned Beatty. The film is based on the non-fiction book of the same name by Woodward and Bernstein, which chronicles their investigative journalism that ultimately led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Screenplay. It remains an iconic and influential example of the power of journalism and investigative reporting.

The Day of the Jackal (1973)

The Day of the Jackal
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Fred Zinnemann, starring Edward Fox, Terence Alexander, Michel Auclair, Alan Badel
Rated PG

The Day of the Jackal is a 1973 political thriller, based on the 1971 novel of the same name by Frederick Forsyth. The film follows a professional assassin, known only as the Jackal, as he is hired by the OAS, a French dissident paramilitary organization, to assassinate Charles de Gaulle, the President of France. The Jackal, played by Edward Fox, embarks on a patient, meticulous mission to successfully complete his contract, while an elite team of police detectives struggle to identify and capture him before he can carry out his mission. In the end, the police come close to apprehending the Jackal, but he ultimately escapes and his mission goes unfinished.

Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Kramer vs. Kramer
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Robert Benton, starring Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, Jane Alexander, Justin Henry
Rated PG

Kramer vs. Kramer is a 1979 American drama film directed by Robert Benton, starring Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep. It tells the story of a couple, Ted and Joanna Kramer, and their son, Billy. When Joanna decides to leave Ted and Billy, Ted is left to care for Billy alone. Despite his inexperience as a parent, Ted works hard to provide for his son. At the same time, Joanna reevaluates her decision to leave and decides to fight for custody of their son. The film follows the two through their legal battle, as they fight to determine who will take custody of Billy. The film explores the issues of divorce, single parenting, and parental responsibility, and how they affect a family.

Cabaret (1972)

Cabaret
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Bob Fosse, starring Liza Minnelli, Michael York, Helmut Griem, Joel Grey
Rated PG

Cabaret is a musical film directed by Bob Fosse in 1972 and based on the 1966 Broadway musical of the same name. Set in 1931 Berlin, the film follows the life of American singer Sally Bowles as she performs in a nightclub and embarks on a romantic relationship with an English academic, Brian Roberts. Along the way, the two must confront the turbulent political and social atmosphere of pre-Nazi Germany. The film features songs from the musical including the Academy Award-winning title song, "Cabaret", as well as other hits such as "Willkommen" and "Money". Cabaret was a commercial and critical success and won eight Academy Awards, including Best Director for Fosse.

The Conversation (1974)

The Conversation
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Frederic Forrest
Rated PG

The Conversation is a psychological thriller directed by Francis Ford Coppola. The film follows the story of Harry Caul, a paranoid and obsessive surveillance expert who is tasked with recording and deciphering a conversation between a young couple. As Caul delves deeper into the conversation, he becomes increasingly paranoid and obsessed, as he tries to figure out the true meaning of the conversation. As the story progresses, Caul comes to the realization that the couple's conversation is related to a potential murder plot, and that he may have stumbled upon a greater conspiracy. In the end, Caul desperately tries to save the couple from the danger he believes they are in, while at the same time coming face to face with the dark truth of his own actions.

Dirty Harry (1971)

Dirty Harry
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Don Siegel, Clint Eastwood, starring Clint Eastwood, Andrew Robinson, Harry Guardino, Reni Santoni
Rated R

Dirty Harry is a 1971 American action thriller starring Clint Eastwood as the eponymous San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) inspector "Dirty" Harry Callahan. When a psychotic serial killer known as Scorpio (Andy Robinson) terrorizes the city and kidnaps a 14-year-old girl, Callahan is assigned to the case. As Callahan pursues Scorpio, he clashes with the mayor and the police commissioner who both question his unorthodox methods. Callahan comes to the realization that Scorpio is a threat to be taken seriously and must use all of his skills and resources to bring him to justice. In the end, Callahan captures Scorpio and returns the missing girl to safety.

Serpico (1973)

Serpico
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Al Pacino, John Randolph, Jack Kehoe, Biff McGuire
Rated R

Serpico (1973) is a drama directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Al Pacino as the title character, an undercover police officer in New York City. The film follows Frank Serpico as he attempts to expose the rampant corruption in the NYPD and bring the guilty officers to justice. Despite his moral convictions, Serpico faces resistance from both his fellow officers and the criminal underworld he is trying to expose. In the end, Serpico succeeds in bringing attention to the issue, but is forced to leave the force and go into hiding. Despite the difficulties he faced, Serpico remains a heroic figure, willing to risk everything to uphold his moral code.

The French Connection (1971)

The French Connection
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From William Friedkin, starring Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider, Fernando Rey, Tony Lo Bianco
Rated R

The French Connection is a 1971 crime thriller set in New York City. It follows two NYPD detectives, Popeye Doyle (Gene Hackman) and Buddy 'Cloudy' Russo (Roy Scheider), as they attempt to intercept a huge shipment of heroin from Marseille that is being smuggled into the city. With intense action and suspense, the two detectives race against the clock to find the shipment before it reaches the streets. As the investigation progresses, they uncover a complex web of corruption and deceit, eventually leading them to an unexpected criminal mastermind. In the climax, Popeye and Cloudy face off with the mastermind in a deadly confrontation. This classic film won five Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director, and is widely considered one of the greatest action movies of all time.

Deliverance (1972)

Deliverance
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From John Boorman, starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox
Rated R

Deliverance (1972) is an American thriller film directed by John Boorman. Set in the Georgia wilderness, the film follows four city dwellers as they embark on a canoeing trip down the Cahulawassee River. As the men navigate the river, they face treacherous rapids and unexpected danger. Along the way, they must confront their own personal demons and fight for their very lives as they come face to face with a pair of ruthless hillbilly mountain men. Ultimately, the men must rely on their strength, courage and wits in order to survive this harrowing journey and make it back unscathed.

Nashville (1975)

Nashville
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Robert Altman, starring Keith Carradine, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley, Shelley Duvall
Rated R

Nashville is a 1975 American musical drama film directed by Robert Altman and written by Joan Tewkesbury. The film follows 24 characters in Nashville, Tennessee, during the week leading up to a political rally for a populist local candidate. It stars an ensemble cast including David Arkin, Barbara Baxley, Ned Beatty, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley, Keith Carradine, Geraldine Chaplin, Shelley Duvall, Allen Garfield, Michael Murphy, and Henry Gibson. The film is a character study of Nashville's citizens, including musicians, a political hopeful, a great deal of aspiring singers and songwriters, and their various interactions. The themes of the film include ambition, the music industry, media manipulation, loyalty, and political corruption. Nashville portrays the complex relationships among these characters and explores the real-life power dynamics of the city. At the 1976 Academy Awards, Nashville was nominated for five awards, including Best Picture, Best Original Song for Carradine's song "I'm Easy," Best Director for Altman, Best Supporting Actress for Blakley, and Best Original Screenplay for Tewkesbury. The film was also chosen in 2005 by the Library of Congress for preservation in the

 



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