Movies About Insurrection

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Movies About Insurrection

When it comes to Movies About Insurrection, there is no limit to the creators talking about this feeling. We found 25 of the best ones.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey. The film follows Randle McMurphy (Jack Nicholson), a rebellious yet charming convict who fakes insanity to be sent to a mental institution instead of prison, where he clashes with the oppressive Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher). Through his rebelliousness, McMurphy helps empower the other inmates and attempts to change the oppressive system of the institution. Ultimately, the struggle between McMurphy and Ratched leads to tragic consequences. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Samurai Rebellion (1967)

Samurai Rebellion
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Masaki Kobayashi, starring Toshirô Mifune, Yôko Tsukasa, Gô Katô, Tatsuyoshi Ehara
Rated Not Rated

Samurai Rebellion is a 1967 Japanese film directed by Masaki Kobayashi. Set in 18th century Japan, the film follows Isaburo Sasahara, a warrior of the samurai class who is married to a woman beneath his rank. When Isaburo's son is ordered to marry the mistress of the powerful Lord Matsudaira, Isaburo refuses to comply due to his loyalty to his son. Matsudaira then orders his men to take Isaburo and his family into custody in order to enforce his wishes. Isaburo and his family are then forced to endure a series of injustices and indignities, leading Isaburo to decide to rebel against Matsudaira. Despite the attempts to stop him, Isaburo and his allies fight their way to freedom and ultimately defeat the oppressive lord. The film offers a powerful commentary on the oppressive nature of the power structure of samurai society, and offers a glimpse into the lives of those who had to live within its confines.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

The Battle of Algiers
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Samia Kerbash
Rated Not Rated

The Battle of Algiers is a 1966 Italian-Algerian historical war film about the Algerian War for independence from France in the 1950s. The film follows the intertwined stories of Ali La Pointe, a leader in the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN), and Colonel Mathieu, a French paratrooper tasked with quelling the rebellion. As the insurgency grows and violence escalates, the film chronicles the brutal tactics used by both sides in the struggle for power. As the film progresses, the FLN’s tactics become increasingly desperate and sophisticated, while Mathieu is slowly revealed to have a more nuanced and subtle understanding of the situation than his superiors. Ultimately, the French succeed in suppressing the revolt, but the film ends with an ambiguous representation of the future of the country. The Battle of Algiers is widely considered one of the greatest films of all time, praised for its realistic portrayal of the conflict and powerful political message.

Papillon (1973)

Papillon
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Franklin J. Schaffner, starring Steve McQueen, Dustin Hoffman, Victor Jory, Don Gordon
Rated R

Papillon is a 1973 American prison drama based on the autobiographical books Papillon and Banco by Henri Charrière. The film stars Steve McQueen as Henri Charrière (nicknamed Papillon), a French safecracker who is unjustly convicted of murder and condemned to life imprisonment in the notorious penal colony on Devil's Island. Along with his fellow convict and friend Louis Dega (Dustin Hoffman), Papillon forms a daring plan to escape the prison and gain his freedom. The film follows their extraordinary journey, as they endure harsh conditions, daring escapes, and impossible odds. Along the way, Papillon discovers his true strength and resilience, and ultimately finds redemption.

Battleship Potemkin (1925)

Battleship Potemkin
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sergei Eisenstein, starring Aleksandr Antonov, Vladimir Barskiy, Grigoriy Aleksandrov, Ivan Bobrov
Rated Not Rated

Battleship Potemkin follows the crew of a Russian battleship in the early 1900s. It chronicles a mutiny led by the sailors against their oppressive officers. After the mutiny, the crew of the Potemkin is joined by the citizens of Odessa in a massive demonstration against the Tsar. The film culminates in a bloody massacre on Odessa's "Potemkin Steps," in which hundreds of civilians are killed by the Tsar's troops. The film is widely considered to be one of the most influential films of all time, praised for its innovative editing and use of the montage technique.

Brazil (1985)

Brazil
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Gilliam, starring Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond
Rated R

Brazil is a 1985 science-fiction dark comedy film directed by Terry Gilliam. The story follows the adventures of an unassuming daydreamer, Sam Lowry, who is caught in a bureaucratic nightmare in a dystopian future where government surveillance is omnipresent and efficient. Sam is inspired by an idealistic woman who he believes is his dream girl, but is actually a terrorist wanted by the government. Sam attempts to save her, but instead finds himself in a power struggle between the government and a rebel underground movement. As Sam navigates through the surreal world, he discovers the dark truth behind the bureaucratic machinery of the state. With its dream-like atmosphere and satirical take on modern society, Brazil is a thought-provoking exploration of the dangers of an oppressive government.

Spartacus (1960)

Spartacus
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Charles Laughton
Rated PG-13

Spartacus is a 1960 American epic historical drama film directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick. It stars Kirk Douglas as Spartacus, a rebellious slave who leads a massive slave revolt against the Roman Empire. The film also features Laurence Olivier as the Roman general and politician Marcus Licinius Crassus, Peter Ustinov as the slave trader Lentulus Batiatus, and Charles Laughton as Roman senator and historian Gaius Julius Caesar. The film follows Spartacus and his allies as they fight for freedom and justice against the powerful Roman Empire. Along the way, Spartacus meets and falls in love with Varinia (Jean Simmons), a slave woman from Gaul. The film climaxes with an epic battle between the slaves and Roman legions, with Spartacus taking on the role of an inspirational leader. In the end, Spartacus is defeated, but his legacy lives on.

1900 (1976)

1900
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Bernardo Bertolucci, starring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Dominique Sanda, Francesca Bertini
Rated Unrated

1900 is a 1976 epic historical drama directed by Bernardo Bertolucci and starring Robert De Niro and Gerard Depardieu. Set in early 20th-century Italy, the film follows the lives of two men born to different social classes, Alfredo Berlinghieri (De Niro) and Olmo Dalcò (Depardieu). Alfredo is the spoiled and privileged son of rich landowner, while Olmo is the illegitimate son of a peasant woman. Through both their struggles, the film paints a vivid portrait of Italian life at the beginning of the 20th century and the social changes taking place in the country at the time. As their lives intertwine and unfold, it becomes clear that the two men must eventually face and confront their differences, their shared history, and their shared destiny.

Missing (1982)

Missing
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Costa-Gavras, starring Jack Lemmon, Sissy Spacek, Melanie Mayron, John Shea
Rated PG

Missing is a 1982 drama/thriller directed by Costa-Gavras and starring Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek. The film tells the story of an American man, Ed Horman (Lemmon), who travels to South America to investigate the mysterious disappearance of his son, who had gone to the country to work for a US-backed military dictatorship. As Ed searches for answers, he discovers a web of corruption and violence which ultimately leads to a devastating conclusion. The film won two Academy Awards, for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Actor, and was nominated for four others, including Best Picture.

Malcolm X (1992)

Malcolm X
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Lee, starring Denzel Washington, Angela Bassett, Delroy Lindo, Spike Lee
Rated PG-13

Malcolm X (1992) is a biographical drama about the life of African American civil rights leader Malcolm X, directed by Spike Lee. It follows his life from his troubled upbringing in the ghettos of Michigan, to growing up in prison, to his conversion to the Nation of Islam and ultimately to his untimely assassination in 1965. Along the way, the film explores Malcolm X’s transformation from street hustler to one of the most influential civil rights figures of the 20th century. The film features a star-studded cast including Denzel Washington, Angela Bassett, Delroy Lindo, and Al Freeman Jr., and its soundtrack features songs from Public Enemy, Rakim, EPMD, and De La Soul.

Lenny (1974)

Lenny
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Bob Fosse, starring Dustin Hoffman, Valerie Perrine, Jan Miner, Stanley Beck
Rated R

Lenny is a biopic about the late stand-up comedian Lenny Bruce, starring Dustin Hoffman as the titular protagonist. The film follows Bruce's rise to fame, his legal troubles and inner turmoil, and his eventual death. It is a powerful and moving exploration of Bruce's life and the struggles he faced due to his controversial material. The film is directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, and features a star-studded cast, including Valerie Perrine, Diane Ladd, and Jan Miner. The film received critical acclaim upon its release and was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Director.

Carlos (2010)

Carlos
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stars: Edgar Ramírez, Alexander Scheer, Fadi Abi Samra, Karam Ghossein, starring
Rated Not Rated

Carlos is a 2010 biographical drama directed by Olivier Assayas. The film follows the story of Venezuelan revolutionary Ilich Ramírez Sánchez, also known as “Carlos the Jackal”. The film depicts his evolution into one of the world’s most wanted terrorists and his violent, yet charismatic, behavior that gained him notoriety in the 1970s and 1980s. The film stars Edgar Ramírez as Carlos and Alexander Scheer, Fadi Abi Samra, and Karam Ghossein as his loyal followers. Through a series of flashbacks and interviews, the film follows Carlos' rise to power and his eventual fall from grace. The film provides insight into his motivations for carrying out violent acts, as well as his involvement in the international terrorist network of the era. Carlos has been critically acclaimed for its gripping and realistic portrayal of the infamous terrorist and its exploration of the human cost of revolutionary warfare.

Duck, You Sucker! (1971)

Duck, You Sucker!
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Rod Steiger, James Coburn, Romolo Valli, Maria Monti
Rated PG

Duck, You Sucker! is a 1971 spaghetti western directed by Sergio Leone. It stars Rod Steiger as Juan Miranda, a Mexican bandit, and James Coburn as John Mallory, an Irish ex-revolutionary. After they meet by chance, they team up to rob a bank in Mexico which is owned by a corrupt government official. Along the way, they get involved in the Mexican Revolution, and discover that their partnership is more than just a robbery. The film is a combination of comedy and adventure, with a strong moral message about friendship and loyalty. With its epic score, stunning cinematography and memorable performances, Duck, You Sucker! is a classic western, and a landmark of the spaghetti western genre.

Bloody Sunday (2002)

Bloody Sunday
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Paul Greengrass, starring James Nesbitt, Tim Pigott-Smith, Nicholas Farrell, Allan Gildea
Rated R

Bloody Sunday is a 2002 British historical drama film about the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre in Derry, Northern Ireland. The film follows the events of the day, beginning with the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association's march for civil rights and ending with the massacre of peaceful protesters by the British Army. It stars James Nesbitt as Ivan Cooper, a Protestant civil rights activist who attempted to negotiate a peaceful settlement between the British Army and the protesters. The film uses hand-held cameras to create a more realistic and chaotic atmosphere, showing the confusion and tragedy of the day. The film was critically acclaimed and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture.

The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006)

The Wind that Shakes the Barley
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Ken Loach, starring Cillian Murphy, Pádraic Delaney, Liam Cunningham, Orla Fitzgerald
Rated Not Rated

The Wind That Shakes the Barley is a 2006 Irish-British war drama directed by Ken Loach and written by his longtime collaborator Paul Laverty. Set during the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921), the film follows two brothers on opposite sides of the conflict. Damien (Cillian Murphy) is an idealistic medical student who sets aside his studies to join the Irish Republican Army, while his brother Teddy (Padraic Delaney) becomes a commander in the British Army's Black and Tans. As the war intensifies, the brothers are forced to choose between their old loyalties and the new cause of freedom. With powerful performances and gripping action, The Wind That Shakes the Barley is a powerful exploration of the human cost of war.

Mesrine: Killer Instinct (2008)

Mesrine: Killer Instinct
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-François Richet, starring Vincent Cassel, Cécile de France, Gérard Depardieu, Gilles Lellouche
Rated R

Mesrine: Killer Instinct is the first part of a two-part French biopic directed by Jean-François Richet, starring Vincent Cassel as notorious French criminal Jacques Mesrine. The film follows Mesrine's life from his time as a soldier in the Algerian War of Independence in the early 1960s, to his crime spree in the late 1970s and early 1980s that made him one of France's most wanted criminals. It chronicles his rise to the top of the criminal underworld and his eventual downfall at the hands of the law. Along the way, the film touches on Mesrine's relationships with his lovers and his family, his escape attempts and his numerous run-ins with the police. In the end, Mesrine is killed in a shootout with police, but his legacy as an iconic French gangster lives on.

Good Night, and Good Luck. (2005)

Good Night, and Good Luck.
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From George Clooney, starring David Strathairn, George Clooney, Patricia Clarkson, Jeff Daniels
Rated PG

Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1 (2008)

Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-François Richet, starring Vincent Cassel, Ludivine Sagnier, Mathieu Amalric, Samuel Le Bihan
Rated R

Salvador (1986)

Salvador
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Oliver Stone, starring James Woods, Jim Belushi, Michael Murphy, John Savage
Rated R

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)

The Unbearable Lightness of Being
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Philip Kaufman, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Juliette Binoche, Lena Olin, Derek de Lint
Rated R

The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996)

The People vs. Larry Flynt
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Woody Harrelson, Courtney Love, Edward Norton, Brett Harrelson
Rated R

Easy Rider (1969)

Easy Rider
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Dennis Hopper, starring Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson, Antonio Mendoza
Rated R

The Baader Meinhof Complex (2008)

The Baader Meinhof Complex
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Uli Edel, starring Martina Gedeck, Moritz Bleibtreu, Johanna Wokalek, Bruno Ganz
Rated R

Burn! (1969)

Burn!
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Marlon Brando, Evaristo Márquez, Renato Salvatori, Dana Ghia
Rated R

1984 (1984)

1984
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Michael Radford, starring John Hurt, Richard Burton, Suzanna Hamilton, Cyril Cusack
Rated R

 



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