Movies About Insanity

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Movies About Insanity

For Movies About Insanity, there are so many creators reporting on this topic. Here are 25 of the best ones.

Fight Club (1999)

Fight Club
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, Meat Loaf, Zach Grenier
Rated R

Fight Club is a 1999 American film directed by David Fincher, based on the 1996 novel of the same name by Chuck Palahniuk. Starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton and Helena Bonham Carter, the film follows an unnamed narrator (Norton) suffering from insomnia. He meets a mysterious soap salesman, Tyler Durden (Pitt), and together they form a fight club, a secret underground organization where men can fight each other as a form of therapy. The fight club escalates into an all-out revolution against the corrupt materialistic society in which they live. The film is a darkly comic and violent exploration of masculinity, consumer culture and personal identity.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey. It tells the story of Randle McMurphy (Jack Nicholson), a trouble-making criminal who is sent to a mental institution instead of prison. McMurphy's rebellious spirit inspires the other patients to stand up against the tyrannical reign of Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher). The film explores themes of power, freedom, and the importance of individuality. It won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Nicholson), Best Actress (Fletcher), Best Director (Forman) and Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

The Silence of the Lambs
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Jonathan Demme, starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney, Kasi Lemmons
Rated R

The Silence of the Lambs is a psychological horror-thriller film, directed by Jonathan Demme, and based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Thomas Harris. The movie follows FBI trainee Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) as she attempts to track down the notorious serial killer known as Buffalo Bill (Ted Levine). Starling seeks the help of Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins), an imprisoned former psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer, in order to gain insight into the mind of Buffalo Bill. Clarice must also overcome her own inner demons as she battles both her own fears and Hannibal’s psychological manipulation. The Silence of the Lambs won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor (for Hopkins). The film has become a classic and is widely considered to be one of the greatest films ever made.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a classic psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The story follows Marion Crane, a young woman who, in a desperate attempt to escape the drudgery of her everyday life, steals a large sum of money and heads out on the open road. After a series of unfortunate events, Marion finds herself at the Bates Motel, owned and operated by the strange and mysterious Norman Bates. As Marion begins to uncover the disturbing secrets of the motel and its proprietor, she unwittingly sets off a terrifying series of events that will lead to a shocking conclusion. This classic film is considered one of the most influential horror films in history and is often cited as the beginning of the modern horror genre.

Apocalypse Now (1979)

Apocalypse Now
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Frederic Forrest
Rated R

Apocalypse Now is a 1979 war film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Set during the Vietnam War, the story follows Army Captain Benjamin Willard (Martin Sheen) as he is sent on a secret mission to find and eliminate the renegade Colonel Walter Kurtz (Marlon Brando). Along the way, Willard and his team encounter the horrors of war, both physical and psychological, as they travel further into the jungle and further away from the safety of civilization. The film is an exploration of the darkness and chaos of war and its effects on the participants. By the end of the film, Willard comes face to face with Kurtz and is forced to confront the reality of the war and its true cost.

The Shining (1980)

The Shining
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lloyd, Scatman Crothers
Rated R

The Shining is a 1980 horror film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on Stephen King's 1977 novel of the same name. Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) is an aspiring writer and recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the winter caretaker for the isolated historic Overlook Hotel in Colorado. He settles in along with his wife, Wendy (Shelley Duvall), and young son, Danny (Danny Lloyd). Danny possesses “the shining”, psychic abilities that enable him to see into the hotel’s horrific past. As the family settles in, the supernatural forces inhabiting the hotel influence Jack’s sanity, and he turns into a homicidal maniac. Wendy and Danny soon find themselves in a terrifying fight for their lives while Jack circles closer and closer to taking their lives. In the end, Wendy and Danny escape the hotel, but Jack’s fate is left unknown.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn
Rated PG

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a dark comedy directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Peter Sellers. The story follows Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper, a deranged U.S. Air Force general who orders a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union against the orders of the President and his staff. The President and his advisors—including the titular Dr. Strangelove, a wheelchair-bound ex-Nazi scientist—work desperately to prevent a global nuclear holocaust. The movie satirizes the Cold War paranoia of a nuclear conflict between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. and, by extension, takes a humorous look at the dangers of government bureaucracy and nuclear weapon technology.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

"A Clockwork Orange" is a 1971 dystopian crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. The film follows protagonist Alex, a young and charismatic delinquent, as he undertakes a brutal journey of self-discovery. Alex and his gang roam the streets of a futuristic England, committing acts of "ultra-violence" and terrorizing the public. After Alex is captured and sentenced to prison for his crimes, he participates in a controversial experiment that strips him of his free will in an attempt to "cure" his violent behavior. As he is forced to choose between his own moral agency and the safety of his actions, Alex and the audience are taken on a journey to explore the very nature of human nature.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is a groundbreaking science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick and written by Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke. The film follows the story of a voyage to Jupiter with the sentient computer HAL 9000, and the series of events that occur surrounding the discovery of a mysterious black monolith. Along the way, the crew encounters various extraterrestrial forces, including a mysterious alien race known as the "Star Child". The story reflects on the growth of human evolution, and the possibilities of technology in the future. The film has been acclaimed for its technical achievement, visual effects, and score, and its influence on the science fiction genre.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is a psychological drama about four individuals, who, in their pursuit of their dreams, become increasingly isolated from society and themselves. The main characters include Sara Goldfarb, an elderly woman whose obsession with appearing on a TV game show leads her to an addiction to diet pills; her son Harry, an aspiring drug dealer looking to make big money; his girlfriend Marion, an aspiring fashion designer who gets caught up in the drug trade; and his friend Tyrone, a small-time drug addict struggling to stay clean. The four characters' lives soon spiral out of control as their dreams begin to slip away, leading to a powerful story of addiction, desperation and ultimately redemption.

Citizen Kane (1941)

Citizen Kane
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Orson Welles, starring Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore, Agnes Moorehead
Rated PG

Citizen Kane is a 1941 American drama film directed and produced by Orson Welles, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Herman J. Mankiewicz. Considered by many critics, filmmakers, and fans to be the greatest movie ever made, Citizen Kane is a complex film focusing on the life and legacy of Charles Foster Kane, played by Welles, a wealthy newspaper publisher. The story is told in flashbacks in a nonlinear narrative as the newsreel reporter Thompson (William Alland) investigates the circumstances behind Kane's dying word, "Rosebud". The film examines Kane's life and career, and how his idealistic but flawed dream of power and success ultimately leads to his undoing. The film features Welles's innovative and dramatic use of deep-focus cinematography, long takes, and sound effects, as well as a unique narrative structure. It was nominated for nine Academy Awards and won for Best Writing (Original Screenplay). Its influence on the film industry has been profound and its legacy endures.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 romantic science fiction film directed by Michel Gondry, written by Charlie Kaufman, and starring Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet. It follows Joel Barish and Clementine Kruczynski, two people who have had their memories of each other erased from their minds via a medical procedure. As they slowly begin to remember their past together, the two fall in love again, despite knowing that their relationship may not last. The film explores themes of memory, regret, and the nature of love. It won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Editing.

Full Metal Jacket (1987)

Full Metal Jacket
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Matthew Modine, R. Lee Ermey, Vincent D'Onofrio, Adam Baldwin
Rated R

Full Metal Jacket is a 1987 war film directed by Stanley Kubrick and written by Kubrick, Michael Herr, and Gustav Hasford. It follows a platoon of U.S. Marines through their training and onto their deployment in the Vietnam War. The film stars Matthew Modine, Adam Baldwin, Vincent D'Onofrio, R. Lee Ermey, Dorian Harewood, Arliss Howard, and Kevyn Major Howard. The first half of the film focuses on the Marines' brutal training under the menacing Gunnery Sergeant Hartman (Ermey). It culminates in the shooting of a peaceful Vietnamese civilian by Private "Joker" (Modine). The second half of the film follows Joker and his fellow Marines as they fight their way through the Tet Offensive in Hue City. As the Marines face the harsh realities of war, it becomes clear that the Marines are no longer the same men who entered boot camp. Throughout the film, viewers are reminded of the horrors of war and the psychological ramifications of violence. Full Metal Jacket is a powerful anti-war film that challenges viewers to consider the consequences of military action.

Shutter Island (2010)

Shutter Island
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley
Rated R

Shutter Island is a psychological thriller directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio as U.S. Marshall Teddy Daniels. In 1954, Teddy and his partner Chuck Aule are sent to Shutter Island, an island off the coast of Massachusetts, to investigate the disappearance of a patient from a hospital for the criminally insane. As they unravel the mystery of the disappearance, Teddy's own sanity is questioned as he discovers a web of deceit and corruption lurking beneath the surface of the island. With each new revelation, Teddy must confront his own demons as he faces the truth of Shutter Island.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind tells the story of Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Nash, who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. After developing a revolutionary theory of economic game theory, Nash is faced with a personal struggle to overcome his mental illness and take control of his life. As Nash’s mental illness takes its toll on his relationships and career, he begins to find solace in the study of mathematics. With the help of his loving wife, Nash slowly recovers and comes to discover that his delusions were actually visions of the future. The film follows Nash’s tumultuous journey as he discovers his true genius, proving that love and determination can overcome any obstacle.

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks
Rated R

Taxi Driver is a 1976 American psychological drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Paul Schrader. Set in a decaying, morally bankrupt New York City, the film follows Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), a deeply troubled and lonely taxi driver who attempts to save a teenage prostitute, Iris (Jodie Foster). He also plots a campaign of vigilante justice against the criminals he perceives as responsible for the city's decline. The film also features Harvey Keitel, Cybill Shepherd, Peter Boyle, Albert Brooks, and Leonard Harris. Taxi Driver explores themes of loneliness, urban despair, and violent vigilantism, and its cultural influence has been felt in a variety of other works. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for De Niro. It has since become one of the most acclaimed films of all time.

The Truman Show (1998)

The Truman Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich
Rated PG

The Truman Show is a comedic drama directed by Peter Weir and starring Jim Carrey. It tells the story of Truman Burbank, a man who has been unknowingly living inside a reality TV show since the day he was born. His entire world has been constructed as a set and all the people in it, including his family, have been hired actors. As Truman begins to unravel the truth of his life, he attempts to break free of the false reality that has been created around him. This ultimately leads to a climactic conclusion that reveals the truth and finally sets him free.

The Sixth Sense (1999)

The Sixth Sense
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From M. Night Shyamalan, starring Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment, Toni Collette, Olivia Williams
Rated PG-13

The Sixth Sense is a 1999 supernatural horror drama film written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan. It stars Bruce Willis as a child psychologist who tries to help a young boy, played by Haley Joel Osment, who is able to see and talk to ghosts. The boy is plagued by visions of the dead and must confront his fear in order to make peace with the ghosts of the past. With the help of the psychologist, he learns to accept his gift and use it to help others. The film received six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, and was a box office success, grossing over $672 million worldwide.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a groundbreaking 1966 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman. It is the story of nurse Alma (Bibi Andersson) and her patient Elisabet Vogler (Liv Ullmann), a stage actress who has become inexplicably mute. The two women go to a remote cottage, where Alma becomes increasingly obsessed with her patient, trying to discover the cause of her silence. As their relationship deepens, Alma and Elisabet's identities appear to become intertwined as each woman's sense of self is challenged and explored. Ultimately, the film provides no easy answers to its questions about identity, reality, and morality.

Trainspotting (1996)

Trainspotting
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Danny Boyle, starring Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner, Jonny Lee Miller, Kevin McKidd
Rated R

Trainspotting is a 1996 British black comedy directed by Danny Boyle and written by John Hodge. It is based on the novel of the same name by Irvine Welsh. The film follows a group of heroin addicts living in the economically depressed area of Edinburgh, Scotland and their passage through life. It follows main character Mark Renton (played by Ewan McGregor), a young man who is determined to quit his addiction, and his close friends Spud (Ewen Bremner), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller) and Begbie (Robert Carlyle). Through a series of darkly humorous vignettes, the film looks at how the characters deal with their addiction, mental health issues, and the consequences of their choices. The film has become an iconic British film, praised for its realistic and honest depiction of drug addiction, the struggles of youth and its powerful soundtrack.

A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

A Woman Under the Influence
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From John Cassavetes, starring Gena Rowlands, Peter Falk, Fred Draper, Lady Rowlands
Rated R

A Woman Under the Influence is a 1974 American drama film directed by John Cassavetes and starring Gena Rowlands, Peter Falk, and Fred Draper. The film tells the story of Mabel Longhetti (Rowlands), a woman whose unusual behavior leads her husband Nick (Falk) to commit her to a mental institution. As Mabel struggles to come to terms with her diagnosis and the stigma of mental illness, Nick is forced to confront his own feelings of guilt, despair, and helplessness. Throughout the film, the couple's struggles are portrayed with a raw, naturalistic intensity as they attempt to reach a resolution and maintain their marriage.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Sidney Blackmer
Rated Approved

Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 American psychological horror film written and directed by Roman Polanski, based on the novel by Ira Levin. The film tells the story of a pregnant woman who, after moving into a new apartment with her husband, becomes increasingly suspicious that their eccentric neighbors may be part of a Satanic cult which wants to take her baby for use in their rituals. The film stars Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, and Ruth Gordon, and features a memorable score by Krzysztof Komeda. Rosemary's Baby is renowned for its suspenseful, psychological horror, and is widely seen as one of the greatest horror films of all time.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is a psychological science fiction thriller directed by Richard Kelly. The film follows the story of a troubled teenage boy, Donnie Darko, who is plagued by visions of a large, demonic rabbit. After narrowly escaping a bizarre accident, Donnie begins a psychological journey that leads him to confront his destiny. Along the way, he meets a number of interesting characters who help him to understand the power of fate and the fragility of life. Donnie's quest to understand the strange visions he has leads him to uncover a dark conspiracy involving time travel and the potential destruction of the world. It is a visually stunning and thought-provoking story about the power of perception, the power of love, and the power of fate.

12 Monkeys (1995)

12 Monkeys
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Gilliam, starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, Brad Pitt, Joseph Melito
Rated R

12 Monkeys is a 1995 American science fiction neo-noir film directed by Terry Gilliam and starring Bruce Willis, Madeleine Stowe, and Brad Pitt. In the year 2035, a deadly virus has wiped out almost all of humanity and the remaining survivors live underground. To find a cure and save the human race, a convict is sent back in time to 1996 in order to find and stop the source of the virus. Along the way, he discovers a shadowy organization known as the Army of the Twelve Monkeys, which may be the true masterminds behind the virus. The film follows his journey as he attempts to unravel the mystery of the virus and save the future.

The Night of the Hunter (1955)

The Night of the Hunter
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Charles Laughton, starring Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Lillian Gish, James Gleason
Rated Not Rated

The Night of the Hunter is a 1955 classic film directed by Charles Laughton and starring Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Lillian Gish, and Sally Jane Bruce. The film tells the story of a sinister preacher, Harry Powell (Mitchum), who arrives in a small West Virginia town in search of two children whose father had entrusted them with the secret of a hidden fortune. Powell, using his charm and religious conviction to win over the gullible locals, soon finds the children, initiating a dangerous game of cat-and-mouse. As Powell's pursuit of the children intensifies, the stakes become higher and higher, and ultimately lead to an exciting and suspenseful climax. Along the way, the film examines themes of religion, trust, and justice.

 



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