Movies About Government Control

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Movies About Government Control

Ever watched these Movies About Government Control? We know you'll find some new movies. Here are 7 of the top ones.

The Look of Silence (2014)

The Look of Silence
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Joshua Oppenheimer, starring Adi Rukun, M.Y. Basrun, Volker Hanisch, Amir Hasan
Rated PG-13

The Look of Silence is a 2014 documentary film directed by Joshua Oppenheimer that follows an optometrist, Adi, as he confronts the men responsible for the 1965 genocide in Indonesia. Through Adi’s eyes, the film reveals how the perpetrators of the genocide are still in positions of power and have largely been left unpunished, while the victims and their families have been left to live in fear and silence. Adi, who lost his brother during the genocide, uses his work as an optometrist to seek out the perpetrators and confront them. The film combines both archival footage of the events of 1965 and interviews with the victims and perpetrators, as well as Adi’s confrontations with them. Ultimately, The Look of Silence serves to document the long-lasting effects of the genocide, and the courage of the victims to break their silence and confront those responsible.

The Corporation (2003)

The Corporation
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Mark Achbar, Jennifer Abbott, starring Mikela Jay, Rob Beckwermert, Christopher Gora, Nina Jones
Rated Not Rated

The Corporation is a 2003 Canadian documentary film directed by Mark Achbar and Jennifer Abbott. It examines the modern-day corporation, considering its legal status as a class of person and evaluating its behavior towards society and the world at large. The film features interviews with corporate insiders, academics, and critics, including Noam Chomsky, Naomi Klein, Milton Friedman, and Michael Moore. The film examines the rise of the corporation and its increasing influence over society, looking at a variety of issues such as globalization, accounting fraud, and its role in public health and the environment. It also looks at how corporations are structured to maximize profit, often at the expense of workers, communities, and the environment. The film also examines the power of corporate media, exploring how corporations manipulate and control the information that is presented to the public. Throughout the film, the directors examine the many ethical, legal, and economic issues raised by the modern corporation.

The Gatekeepers (2012)

The Gatekeepers
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Dror Moreh, starring Ami Ayalon, Avraham Shalom, Avi Dichter, Yaakov Peri
Rated PG-13

The Gatekeepers is a riveting 2012 documentary that follows six former heads of the Shin Bet, Israel's secret service agency. These six men, all born and raised in Israel, candidly share their experiences and insights on the decades-long conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. As they reflect on the successes and failures of their service, they offer unique perspectives on what it means to defend a nation and its people. Through their stories, viewers come to understand the complex reality of the conflict and its consequences for both sides. The Gatekeepers offers an essential and thought-provoking look at a highly contentious issue.

Merchants of Doubt (2014)

Merchants of Doubt
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Robert Kenner, starring Frederick Singer, Naomi Oreskes, Jamy Ian Swiss, Sam Roe
Rated PG-13

Merchants of Doubt (2014) is a documentary directed by Robert Kenner that explores the way that a small number of politically-connected individuals have been able to manipulate public opinion on controversial issues such as climate change, tobacco, and genetically-modified foods. Through interviews with key figures and archival footage, Kenner reveals how a network of "experts" has been able to plant doubt in the public's mind regarding the science behind these topics, despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary. The film follows a handful of these "experts" and the strategies they use to sow confusion and doubt, from creating seemingly impartial front groups and think tanks, to working the media and influencing public policy. In the end, the film reveals the power of corporate influence over the public discourse and the potential dangers of allowing powerful interests to manipulate public opinion.

Best of Enemies: Buckley vs. Vidal (2015)

Best of Enemies: Buckley vs. Vidal
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Robert Gordon, Morgan Neville, starring Gore Vidal, William F. Buckley, Dick Cavett, Noam Chomsky
Rated R

Best of Enemies: Buckley vs. Vidal is a 2015 documentary film directed by Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville. The film follows the legendary television debates between conservative William F. Buckley Jr. and liberal Gore Vidal during the 1968 presidential election. The film chronicles the rise of the debates, beginning with their backgrounds and how they were viewed by the media. It also looks at how the debates became a symbol of the culture wars of the '60s. Through archival footage and interviews with friends and relatives, the film captures the drama and chaos of the live television event. The film explores how the debates changed the relationship between media and politics in America and made Buckley and Vidal household names. It also examines how their feud lasted for decades and continued to shape the American political landscape. It ultimately provides insight into how these two men shaped the modern American political discourse.

Where to Invade Next (2015)

Where to Invade Next
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Michael Moore, starring Michael Moore, Johnny Fancelli, Christina Fancelli, Lorena Lardini
Rated R

Where to Invade Next is a documentary film by Michael Moore which explores various social issues in various countries around the world, and how their approaches can be beneficial for the United States. Moore "invades" countries such as Italy, Finland, France, Portugal, Tunisia, Iceland, and Slovenia and explores their social welfare programs, educational systems, and overall approach to life. He finds that each of these countries have something to offer which the United States can learn from, and he hopes to bring this knowledge back and use it to improve life in America. The film is an eye-opening exploration of what the rest of the world has to offer, and how the United States can, and should, take advantage of these programs and approaches.

The Ambassador (2011)

The Ambassador
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Mads Brügger, starring Mads Brügger, Heather Schmid
Rated Not Rated

 



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