Movies About The Twin Towers On Netflix

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Movies About The Twin Towers On Netflix

Ever watched these Movies About The Twin Towers On Netflix? We bet you'll find some new picks. We listed 25 of our favorites.

The Culture High (2014)

The Culture High
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Brett Harvey, starring Snoop Dogg, Joe Rogan, Ronald Reagan, Penn Jillette
Rated TV-14

The Culture High is a 2014 documentary directed by Brett Harvey that takes a hard look at the ongoing war on drugs. Through interviews with a wide variety of experts, including scientists, politicians, and activists, the film explores a range of issues related to the war on drugs, including the criminalization of drug users, the over-incarceration of nonviolent offenders, the political and economic motivations of the war on drugs, as well as the human cost of this war. The film also examines the social and economic benefits of ending the war on drugs and legalizing marijuana. The Culture High provides an introspective look at the controversial and complicated issue of the war on drugs, and ultimately argues that the real drug problem is the drug war itself.

Virunga (2014)

Virunga
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Orlando von Einsiedel, starring André Bauma, Emmanuel de Merode, Mélanie Gouby, Rodrigue Mugaruka Katembo
Rated Not Rated

Virunga is a 2014 documentary film directed by Orlando von Einsiedel. It focuses on the struggles of the park rangers and other dedicated individuals who are working to protect the endangered mountain gorillas of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The film examines the conflict between the conservation efforts and the interests of poachers and oil companies, who are attempting to exploit the park’s rich resources. It follows park ranger Emmanuel de Merode and his fellow rangers as they face armed militia, poachers, and other threats to the park and its animals. The film also chronicles the inspiring stories of hope and resilience of the people of Virunga, who are fighting to protect their home and the endangered mountain gorillas living there.

The Act of Killing (2012)

The Act of Killing
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Joshua Oppenheimer, Anonymous, Christine Cynn, starring Anwar Congo, Herman Koto, Syamsul Arifin, Ibrahim Sinik
Rated Not Rated

The Act of Killing (2012) is a documentary directed by Joshua Oppenheimer, Christine Cynn, and an anonymous director. It examines the 1965-66 mass killings in Indonesia of alleged communists and their sympathizers, from the perspective of in-depth interviews with men who carried out the killings. Through reenactments of the killings, the film explores how the perpetrators have coped with their past, and, in some cases, glorified their actions through movies, songs, and public performances. The film also looks at the implications of the killings on the country and its citizens, as well as the silencing of political dissent. Ultimately, the film questions the idea of justice and how it is ever achieved in situations where the perpetrators are not held accountable.

Blackfish (2013)

Blackfish
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gabriela Cowperthwaite, starring Tilikum, Dave Duffus, Samantha Berg, Dean Gomersall
Rated PG-13

Blackfish is a documentary film that tells the story of Tilikum, a performing killer whale held by SeaWorld and the consequences of keeping such intelligent and sentient creatures in captivity. The film follows Tilikum’s troubled life, his relationships with trainers and other whales, and the series of events that ultimately led to his death. It paints a heartbreaking portrait of the devastating psychological and physical toll that captivity has on Tilikum, who was taken from his family at a young age and forced to perform in shows for human entertainment. The film also explores the dangers of captivity for other orcas and the lack of regulation of marine parks by the government.

Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010)

Exit Through the Gift Shop
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Banksy, starring Banksy, Mr. Brainwash, Space Invader, Debora Guetta
Rated R

Exit Through the Gift Shop is a 2010 British-French documentary film directed by the graffiti artist Banksy. The film follows Thierry Guetta, a French immigrant living in Los Angeles, who begins filming the underground street art scene, and eventually becomes an artist himself. The film focuses on Guetta's transition from a hobbyist videotaping graffiti artists to an artist in his own right, and his subsequent relationships with Banksy and Shepard Fairey. It also explores the power of the commercialization of street art, as a form of art that has the potential to become profitable. The film presents a critical view of the art world and its reliance on hype and branding.

Inequality for All (2013)

Inequality for All
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Jacob Kornbluth, starring Robert Reich, Lily Tomlin, Candice Bergen, Mary Tyler Moore
Rated PG

Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film directed by Jacob Kornbluth and produced by Jen Chaiken. It stars Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor, as he examines the widening income inequality in the United States. Reich uses economic data to explain how the nation’s economic inequality is a direct result of policy decisions made by elected officials in Washington, D.C. He then discusses the consequences of such inequality, such as an increase in poverty and a decrease in economic mobility. Finally, he presents solutions that could reverse the current trend. The film offers an in-depth look at the issue of income inequality in the United States and the effects it has on everyday Americans.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011)

Jiro Dreams of Sushi
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Gelb, starring Jiro Ono, Yoshikazu Ono, Masuhiro Yamamoto, Daisuke Nakazama
Rated PG

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a documentary that follows the life of Jiro Ono, an 85-year-old sushi master and owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a Michelin 3-star restaurant located in a Tokyo train station. Jiro has devoted his life to mastering the art of sushi. With the help of his two sons, Yoshikazu and Takashi, Jiro serves customers who come from all over the world to experience the perfection of his sushi. The film explores Jiro's passion for sushi, his desire to continue to learn and improve, and his relationship with his sons. Through interviews with Jiro, his sons, and customers, we learn more about Jiro’s dedication to sushi, his values, and his commitment to excellence. We also learn about the hard work, dedication, and skill that goes into making sushi and the traditional techniques that Jiro has perfected over the years. The film is an inspiring and heart-warming story that celebrates the art of sushi and the legacy of Jiro Ono.

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013)

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Mami Sunada, starring Hayao Miyazaki, Yumiko Miyoshi, Toshio Suzuki, Shinsuke Nonaka
Rated Not Rated

The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness is a documentary film that explores the creative process of Studio Ghibli, the iconic Japanese animation studio. Through interviews, behind-the-scenes footage and conversations with the studio’s three directors, Hayao Miyazaki, Isao Takahata and producer Toshio Suzuki, the documentary provides a rare look into the inner workings of the studio and its creative process. The documentary also offers a glimpse into the personal lives of the three directors and shows the dedication they have to their work, as well as the challenges they face in their task of creating animated films. The documentary culminates in the production of Miyazaki's last film, The Wind Rises, and reveals the secrets behind the long, exacting process of making an animated masterpiece.

The Central Park Five (2012)

The Central Park Five
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon, starring Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Kharey Wise, Raymond Santana
Rated Not Rated

The Central Park Five is a 2012 documentary film directed by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon. The film focuses on the 1989 Central Park jogger case in New York City, in which five teenage boys of African American and Latino descent were wrongfully convicted of raping and brutally beating a white female jogger. The film follows the story of the five boys over a span of 20 years, from their wrongful conviction in 1989 to their exoneration in 2002. It examines the circumstances of the case and the effects it had on the boys, their families, and the larger community. The film paints a picture of injustice that was perpetuated by the media and law enforcement and talks to the boys, their family members, and other experts to explore how race and class were used to manipulate the criminal justice system. The film is an important reminder of the need for justice and accountability in our legal system.

Man on Wire (2008)

Man on Wire
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James Marsh, starring Philippe Petit, Jean François Heckel, Jean-Louis Blondeau, Annie Allix
Rated PG-13

Man on Wire is a 2008 documentary film directed by James Marsh which tells the story of Philippe Petit's daring double tightrope walk between the recently constructed Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City in 1974. The film follows the preparations leading up to the event, showing Petit's recruitment of a ragtag crew to help him complete the stunt, as well as the events of the day itself. It also explores the motivations behind Petit's ambition, and the philosophical implications of his actions. The film won the 2009 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Gideon's Army (2013)

Gideon's Army
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Dawn Porter, starring
Rated Not Rated

Gideon’s Army is an award-winning documentary that follows three young, committed public defenders in the Deep South as they struggle against long odds to fight for the rights of their clients. The film takes a hard look at the American criminal justice system, which is still very much shaped by the legacy of the Jim Crow era. The public defenders – Travis Williams, Brandy Alexander, and June Hardwick – face enormous pressure, limited resources, and an unyielding system as they fight for their clients. Through their stories, the film offers insight into the mass incarceration crisis in the United States and its roots in the systemic racism that has been embedded in the criminal justice system for generations.

Nanking (2007)

Nanking
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Bill Guttentag, Dan Sturman, starring Hugo Armstrong, Rosalind Chao, Stephen Dorff, John Getz
Rated R

Nanking is a 2007 documentary directed by Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman. The film tells the story of the Japanese occupation of the Chinese city of Nanking during the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937-38. It focuses on the story of the Nanking Safety Zone, an area set up by Westerners to protect the Chinese civilians from Japanese troops. The documentary features interviews with survivors, along with archival footage and photographs. The film highlights the courage of those who stood up to the Japanese soldiers in a time of great suffering and death. It also shines a light on the debate of how we remember and commemorate atrocities such as the Rape of Nanking. The documentary is a powerful reminder of the importance of remembering and learning from history.

Happy People: A Year in the Taiga (2010)

Happy People: A Year in the Taiga
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Werner Herzog, Dmitry Vasyukov, starring Werner Herzog, Gennady Soloviev, Anatoly Blumei, Gennady Tiganov
Rated Not Rated

Happy People: A Year in the Taiga is a 2010 documentary directed by Werner Herzog and Dmitry Vasyukov. The film follows the lives of a small community of trappers who live in the remote Siberian Taiga. The documentary takes a look at the daily lives of the people living there, as well as the wildlife and the environment that surrounds them. The documentary shows how the trappers live off the land, hunt, fish, and build homes from the resources around them. The film also looks at the impact that the changing seasons have on their lives, as they move from winter to summer and back again. Throughout the film, viewers get an intimate look at the lives of these people, as well as the beauty of this remote and vast landscape.

The Invisible War (2012)

The Invisible War
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Kirby Dick, starring Amy Ziering, Kirby Dick, Kori Cioca, Jessica Hinves
Rated Not Rated

The Invisible War is an Academy Award-nominated documentary film by director Kirby Dick about the epidemic of sexual assault in the United States Armed Forces. The film follows the stories of female and male veterans who are survivors of military sexual trauma, and follows their struggles to receive justice from the Department of Defense. Through a series of powerful interviews and testimonies, the film reveals the systemic issues that lead to the problem of sexual assault in the military and the immense difficulty in pursuing justice for survivors. The film also examines how the military justice system works against the victims of these crimes, and how it fails to provide justice and accountability for the perpetrators. Ultimately, the film serves as a powerful call to action for greater accountability and reform in the military justice system.

Crime After Crime (2011)

Crime After Crime
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Yoav Potash, starring Deborah Peagler, Joshua Safran, Nadia Costa, Yoav Potash
Rated Not Rated

Crime After Crime is a 2011 documentary film directed by Yoav Potash. The film follows the story of Debbie Peagler, a woman who was convicted of the murder of her abusive partner in 1983. She was sentenced to 25 years-to-life in prison, with no chance of parole until she had served at least 25 years. The film follows Peagler as she is helped by two lawyers, Nadia Costa and Joshua Safran, who believe her conviction was wrongfully obtained. The film chronicles the struggles of these lawyers to have Peagler's conviction overturned through the California legal system, while also exploring the history of abuse that Peagler endured throughout her life. In the end, Peagler's conviction is overturned and she is released from prison after 25 years. The film is a powerful look at the effects of domestic violence and the power of the legal system to right past wrongs.

Indie Game: The Movie (2012)

Indie Game: The Movie
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Lisanne Pajot, James Swirsky, starring Jonathan Blow, Brandon Boyer, Renaud Bédard, Anthony Carboni
Rated Not Rated

Indie Game: The Movie is a 2012 documentary film directed by Lisanne Pajot and James Swirsky. The film follows the lives of several independent video game developers as they attempt to create and release their own video games. It focuses on their struggles, successes, and failures while attempting to make it in the competitive and often unforgiving world of indie game development. Along the way, the film explores the creative process behind game development, the motivations and inspirations of the developers, and the impact that games can have on their creators. Ultimately, Indie Game: The Movie is an intimate look at the often-overlooked world of independent game development and the passion and dedication that goes into it.

I Am (2010)

I Am
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Tom Shadyac, starring Tom Shadyac, Desmond Tutu, Noam Chomsky, Ray Anderson
Rated Not Rated

I Am is a 2010 documentary from director Tom Shadyac, examining the nature of humanity and our interconnectedness with each other and the planet. The film follows Shadyac as he travels the globe in search of answers to some of life's most profound questions. He interviews high-profile figures such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn, and Lynne McTaggart, and explores the ideas of free will, spirituality, and responsibility. Ultimately, the film argues that if we are to find peace and harmony in the world, we must all work together to connect and care for each other and the planet.

So Much So Fast (2006)

So Much So Fast
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Steven Ascher, Jeanne Jordan, starring Jesse Abbott-Dallamora, Robert Bonazoli, Tyler DiVittorio, Benjamin Heywood
Rated Not Rated

So Much So Fast is an inspiring documentary about the life of Stephen Heywood, a young man diagnosed with the debilitating and incurable motor neuron disease ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). As Stephen's condition deteriorates, his family, friends, and doctors rally around him to find a cure. The film follows Stephen and his family as they fight to maintain hope and normalcy in their lives while coming to terms with his diagnosis. With tremendous courage and resilience, Stephen and his family cope with the harsh reality of this incurable disease. Through interviews with Stephen and his family, medical experts, and others, the film reveals the tremendous impact ALS has had on Stephen's life and the lives of those who love him. Ultimately, Stephen's story serves as a poignant reminder of the fragility and preciousness of life.

Dirty Wars (2013)

Dirty Wars
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Rick Rowley, starring Jeremy Scahill, Nasser Al Aulaqi, Saleha Al Aulaqi, Muqbal Al Kazemi
Rated Not Rated

Restrepo (2010)

Restrepo
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Tim Hetherington, Sebastian Junger, starring The Men of Battle Company 2nd of the 503rd Infantry Regiment 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Juan 'Doc Restrepo, Dan Kearney, LaMonta Caldwell
Rated R

Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2010)

Cave of Forgotten Dreams
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Werner Herzog, starring Werner Herzog, Jean Clottes, Julien Monney, Jean-Michel Geneste
Rated G

Surviving Progress (2011)

Surviving Progress
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Mathieu Roy, Harold Crooks, starring Ronald Wright, Mark Levine, Robert Wright, Marina Silva
Rated Not Rated

Into the Abyss (2011)

Into the Abyss
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Werner Herzog, starring Werner Herzog, Richard Lopez, Michael Perry, Damon Hall
Rated PG-13

Terms and Conditions May Apply (2013)

Terms and Conditions May Apply
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Cullen Hoback, starring Max Schrems, Moby, Mark Zuckerberg, Orson Scott Card
Rated Not Rated

Rich Hill (2014)

Rich Hill
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Andrew Droz Palermo, Tracy Droz Tragos, starring Alyssa Jewell, Andrew Jewell, Elizabeth Jewell, Willie Jewell
Rated Not Rated

 



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