Famous Movies In The 60s

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Famous Movies In The 60s

Have you heard all of these Famous Movies In The 60s? We know you'll find some new films. Here are 24 of the best ones.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef, Aldo Giuffrè
Rated R

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a 1966 Italian-American epic spaghetti western film directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach in the title roles. The plot follows the three gunslingers as they compete to find a fortune in buried Confederate gold amid the chaos of the American Civil War. The film is set in the 1860s during the American Civil War in the western United States. It follows the adventures of three gunslingers as they attempt to find a hidden fortune in Confederate gold. Blondie (Clint Eastwood) is a "good" gunslinger who is out for himself and Tuco (Eli Wallach) is a "bad" bandit with a penchant for double-crossing. They team up together to find the gold and ultimately face off against their nemesis Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef), a ruthless mercenary hired to find the gold. Along their journey, the trio faces off against countless obstacles, including a gang of Mexican bandits and a dangerous group of Confederate soldiers. In the end, only one of the three will be able to walk away with the treasure.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a classic psychological horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1960. It follows the story of Marion Crane, a young woman who steals a large sum of money from her employer and goes on the run. She takes refuge in a secluded motel run by the creepy Norman Bates and his overbearing mother. However, Marion soon discovers that the Bates family harbors a terrifying secret and she is soon caught in a deadly game of cat and mouse. Psycho is known for its groundbreaking cinematography and suspenseful narrative, as well as its iconic score and shower scene. It is widely considered to be one of Hitchcock's most successful films and is still revered to this day as a classic of the horror genre.

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

Once Upon a Time in the West
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards
Rated PG-13

Once Upon a Time in the West is a classic spaghetti western directed by Sergio Leone and starring Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, and Jason Robards. The story follows a mysterious harmonica player (Bronson) as he arrives in a small frontier town and becomes embroiled in a power struggle between a ruthless railroad tycoon (Fonda), a brutal hired gun (Robards), and a widow (Cardinale) trying to protect her land and her late husband's legacy. The town is the site of a major railroad development and the forces of progress and greed threaten to drive out the widow and her children. As events unfold, the harmonica player's true identity and purpose is revealed and he must choose which side he will fight for. With its iconic score, breathtaking cinematography, and compelling performances, Once Upon a Time in the West is a classic of the Western genre and one of Leone's greatest works.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is a science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the short story "The Sentinel" by Arthur C. Clarke. The film follows a voyage to Jupiter, where a mysterious black monolith is discovered beneath the surface of the moon. As the story progresses, the mission crew discovers artificial intelligence on board their spacecraft, called HAL 9000. The conflict between the human crew and HAL 9000 becomes the focus of the story, as the computer learns to think like a human instead of following its programming. In the end, HAL 9000 is shut down and the mission crew is able to make contact with a mysterious alien race, eventually learning the secrets of the black monolith. The film is a classic example of science fiction, examining the concepts of technology, the human condition, and the mysteries of existence.

The Apartment (1960)

The Apartment
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Billy Wilder, starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray, Ray Walston
Rated Approved

The Apartment is a 1960 romantic comedy directed by Billy Wilder and starring Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine. The story follows C.C. Baxter (Lemmon), an ambitious and eager-to-please insurance clerk who allows his superiors to use his apartment for their extramarital affairs. While trying to rise up the corporate ladder, he falls in love with a woman, Fran Kubelik (MacLaine), who turns out to be one of his bosses' mistresses. The film follows Baxter's attempts to juggle his loyalty to the company and his own feelings, while trying to make things right with the woman he loves. In the end, Baxter learns that true success comes not from pleasing others, but from finding happiness within himself.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Lawrence of Arabia
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lean, starring Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins
Rated Approved

Lawrence of Arabia is a 1962 epic historical drama film directed by David Lean and produced by Sam Spiegel. The film follows the life of T. E. Lawrence, a British Army officer who is sent to help the Arab tribes in their fight against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War. The film stars Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins, Omar Sharif, José Ferrer and Anthony Quayle. The film depicts Lawrence's journey from his early years in the military, to his involvement in the Arab Revolt and ultimately his untimely death in 1935. Along the way, he forms relationships with both the Arabs and the British, and discovers a passion for the desert and its culture. The movie is noted for its stunning visuals of the desert and its epic scale.

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

To Kill a Mockingbird
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Robert Mulligan, starring Gregory Peck, John Megna, Frank Overton, Rosemary Murphy
Rated Approved

To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 American drama film directed by Robert Mulligan. It is based on Harper Lee's novel of the same name. The film stars Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch, a lawyer in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, who, despite the objections of the townspeople, defends a black man who has been accused of raping a white woman. The film also stars Mary Badham as Scout, Atticus Finch's daughter, and Philip Alford as her brother, Jem. Robert Duvall appears in an early role as Arthur "Boo" Radley. The film follows the lives of the Finch family over the course of two years. The story deals with themes of racial injustice, class, courage, and compassion. The film is widely acclaimed, winning three Academy Awards, including best actor for Peck. The film was selected in 1994 for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

The Great Escape (1963)

The Great Escape
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From John Sturges, starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson
Rated Approved

The Great Escape is a 1963 war film directed by John Sturges and starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, Charles Bronson, and James Coburn. It is based on the book of the same name, written by Paul Brickhill, which was based on the true story of a mass escape from a German POW camp during World War II. The film tells the story of a group of Allied prisoners of war in a German camp who plan a daring escape from the facility. The prisoners must outwit their captors, many of whom are sympathetic to the prisoners’ plight, in order to make it out alive. The Great Escape was a critical and commercial success, and is now considered a classic of the war film genre.

The Sound of Music (1965)

The Sound of Music
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Robert Wise, starring Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer, Eleanor Parker, Richard Haydn
Rated G

The Sound of Music is a 1965 American musical drama film, directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. Set in Austria in the 1930s and based on the true story of the von Trapp family, the film follows Maria, a young postulant at an Austrian abbey. After being sent to serve as governess to seven children of widowed Capt. Georg von Trapp, Maria discovers a passion for music and brings joy and life back to the von Trapp household. When the Nazis occupy Austria, Georg is forced to accept a commission in the German navy, and he and his family must attempt a daring escape over the Alps. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

Cool Hand Luke (1967)

Cool Hand Luke
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Stuart Rosenberg, starring Paul Newman, George Kennedy, Strother Martin, J.D. Cannon
Rated GP

Cool Hand Luke is a 1967 American drama film directed by Stuart Rosenberg, starring Paul Newman as the anti-hero Luke, a prisoner in a Florida prison camp who refuses to conform to the camp's rules and expectations. Set in the early 1950s, the film tells the story of Luke Jackson, a prisoner in a rural Florida prison camp who refuses to conform to the camp's rules and expectations. After repeated failed attempts to escape and a number of disciplinary infractions, Luke is sentenced to two years in a brutal prison work camp run by the sadistic Captain. As the other prisoners begin to admire Luke's defiant attitude, he struggles to maintain his spirit in the oppressive environment while also attempting to break free from the camp's grasp. In the end, even in defeat, Luke's courage and determination stand as an example to his fellow prisoners.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

The Battle of Algiers
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Samia Kerbash
Rated Not Rated

The Battle of Algiers (1966) is a political drama film directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. Set in the 1950s, it depicts the three-year struggle between Algerian nationalists and the French colonial government for independence from French rule. The film follows the strategies of the two sides, showing the use of both terrorism and torture by both sides. It also highlights the everyday lives of Algerians caught in the struggle, and the eventual victory of the Algerian people in achieving independence. The film was highly acclaimed and has been used as an educational tool to illustrate the use of guerrilla warfare and the effects of colonialism.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a 1966 Swedish psychological drama directed by Ingmar Bergman and starring Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann. It tells the story of Elisabet Vogler, a famous actress who has suddenly gone mute, and Alma, the nurse assigned to take care of her. Elisabet and Alma’s relationship quickly develops into a complex psychological and emotional bond, as the two women come to realize that their personalities are merging. As their conversation progresses, dream sequences, flashbacks and other techniques are used to reveal the inner workings of their minds. Through this, the film explores deep themes of identity, femininity, silence, communication and human connection.

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962)

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Robert Aldrich, starring Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Victor Buono, Wesley Addy
Rated Passed

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a 1962 psychological thriller film directed by Robert Aldrich, starring Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. The film follows the story of the formerly successful child star, Baby Jane Hudson, and her now-invalid sister, Blanche, during their intense co-dependent relationship. Blanche is confined to a wheelchair after an accident for which Jane is responsible, and Jane resorts to increasingly cruel psychological and physical abuse to keep Blanche from getting better. As Jane's grip on reality slowly disintegrates, Blanche takes advantage of the situation to strike back and gain revenge on Jane for her years of torment. In the end, Baby Jane's delusions lead to her own self-destruction, and Blanche is finally able to escape from Jane's grasp.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Sidney Blackmer
Rated Approved

Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski and based on the bestselling novel by Ira Levin. The story follows Rosemary Woodhouse (Mia Farrow) and her husband Guy (John Cassavetes), who move into an old apartment building with a dark history. After becoming pregnant, Rosemary begins to suspect her husband and their eccentric elderly neighbors may have sinister ulterior motives. Rosemary soon finds herself in a nightmarish situation where she has to protect her unborn child from a diabolical cult and its mysterious leader, who are determined to sacrifice her baby to Satan. As Rosemary's paranoia and fear mount, she must choose between saving her unborn child and her own sanity. Rosemary's Baby is considered one of the greatest horror films of all time and cemented Roman Polanski's reputation as a master of suspense.

8½ (1963)

8½
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Federico Fellini, starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimée, Claudia Cardinale, Sandra Milo
Rated Not Rated

8½ is a surreal comedy-drama film directed by Federico Fellini. It stars Marcello Mastroianni as Guido Anselmi, a film director who is struggling to complete his latest project. Guido is stuck in a creative block and is unable to come up with a clear vision for his film. His personal life is in disarray as his wife is having an affair, his mistress is pregnant, and his producer is pressuring him for results. Guido retreats into a dreamlike world of memories, fantasies, and hallucinations to try and find the inspiration he needs to move forward with his film. The film is an exploration of the creative process and of the difficulty of balancing art and life.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Mike Nichols, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, George Segal, Sandy Dennis
Rated Not Rated

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 dark comedy-drama directed by Mike Nichols and based on Edward Albee's 1962 play of the same name. It stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton as a middle-aged couple, Martha and George, who host a late-night gathering of their college faculty friends. Martha and George engage in a vicious battle of wits, fueled by alcohol, in which they reveal and attack each other's deepest insecurities. As the evening progresses, their secrets become more and more exposed. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Actor and Actress for Taylor and Burton's performances. It is a powerful and timeless portrait of a crumbling marriage and its devastating consequences.

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Night of the Living Dead
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From George A. Romero, starring Duane Jones, Judith O'Dea, Karl Hardman, Marilyn Eastman
Rated Not Rated

Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 horror film directed by George A. Romero. It follows a group of people who are holed up in an abandoned farmhouse, surrounded by a horde of zombies. The group must survive the night as the zombies try to break in and consume them. The film was heavily criticized upon its release for its graphic violence and gore, but has since become a cult classic. The film is credited with popularizing the concept of a zombie apocalypse and inspiring countless imitators.

My Fair Lady (1964)

My Fair Lady
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From George Cukor, starring Audrey Hepburn, Rex Harrison, Stanley Holloway, Wilfrid Hyde-White
Rated G

My Fair Lady is a 1964 musical drama directed by George Cukor and based on George Bernard Shaw's 1913 play Pygmalion. The film stars Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, and tells the story of a Cockney flower girl named Eliza Doolittle who is taught to speak proper English by Henry Higgins, a phonetics professor. The two eventually fall in love, although Higgins is more interested in teaching Eliza than in her romantic advances. Along the way, Eliza faces challenges as she struggles to fit into the upper-class world of London society. Ultimately, however, she succeeds in becoming a well-spoken, sophisticated lady who wins the heart of Henry Higgins. The film won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Harrison), and Best Director (Cukor).

Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

Bonnie and Clyde
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Arthur Penn, starring Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman
Rated R

Bonnie and Clyde is a 1967 classic crime drama about the notorious crime duo of the same name. Directed by Arthur Penn and starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, the film follows the two lovers as they embark on a crime spree across the American Southwest during the Great Depression. Along the way, they become notorious outlaws, robbing banks and evading the police. Despite their lawless lifestyle, the pair remain devoted to one another, ultimately leading to their tragic end. The film is widely considered to be one of the earliest examples of the New Hollywood style of film making.

Goldfinger (1964)

Goldfinger
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Guy Hamilton, starring Sean Connery, Gert Fröbe, Honor Blackman, Shirley Eaton
Rated PG

Goldfinger is an action-packed spy thriller directed by Guy Hamilton and starring Sean Connery as James Bond. In this installment of the Bond series, Bond investigates the activities of Auric Goldfinger, a wealthy gold smuggler. After infiltrating his operation, 007 discovers that Goldfinger is plotting to rob the Fort Knox gold reserve in the United States. Bond must now figure out a way to prevent Goldfinger from succeeding in his mission and save the world from destruction. Along the way, Bond must also contend with Goldfinger's personal pilot, Pussy Galore, and his henchman, Oddjob. With the help of MI6, Bond eventually thwarts Goldfinger's plan and saves the day.

Repulsion (1965)

Repulsion
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser, Yvonne Furneaux
Rated Not Rated

Repulsion is a psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski. Set in London in the 1960s, it follows the story of a young woman named Carol (Catherine Deneuve) who is suffering from severe mental health issues, including severe depression, paranoia, and sexual repression. As her mental state deteriorates, she begins to suffer from hallucinations and delusions, which eventually lead her to murder. The film follows her descent into madness and her struggles to remain sane in a world that she doesn't understand. The film explores themes of gender politics and alienation, as well as psychological and sexual repression.

Band of Outsiders (1964)

Band of Outsiders
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Luc Godard, starring Anna Karina, Claude Brasseur, Danièle Girard, Louisa Colpeyn
Rated Not Rated

Band of Outsiders (1964) is a French New Wave film by director Jean-Luc Godard. The story follows two friends, Franz and Arthur, who plot to rob the wealthy home of the woman with whom Franz is infatuated. They enlist the help of the woman’s best friend, Odile, and the three of them embark on a crime spree that proves to be both dangerous and humorous. Along the way, they encounter a series of bizarre misadventures that test their trust in each other and challenge their moral convictions. This classic film, with its mix of comedy, romance, and crime, is a timeless classic that embodies the spirit of the French New Wave.

Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)

Breakfast at Tiffany's
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Blake Edwards, starring Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen
Rated Approved

Breakfast at Tiffany's is a classic romantic comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Audrey Hepburn. Set in 1960s New York City, the film follows the story of Holly Golightly, a charming and stylish socialite who is searching for love and a purpose in life. Along the way, Holly meets her neighbor Paul Varjak, a struggling writer, and the two form an unlikely friendship. Despite the differences in their backgrounds, Holly and Paul become close, developing a strong bond as they help each other find the happiness they are searching for. With a memorable soundtrack and witty dialogue, Breakfast at Tiffany's is a timeless classic that celebrates the beauty of life and the power of friendship.

Easy Rider (1969)

Easy Rider
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Dennis Hopper, starring Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson, Antonio Mendoza
Rated R

 



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