1950's Sci Fi Movies

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1950's Sci Fi Movies

When it comes to 1950's Sci Fi Movies, there are so many creators reporting on this feeling. Here are 10 of the best ones.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Don Siegel, starring Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, Larry Gates, King Donovan
Rated Approved

Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1956 science fiction horror film directed by Don Siegel. It stars Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, and Carolyn Jones. The story follows the inhabitants of a small California town as they are terrorized by mysterious pods that replicate the exact appearance of the townspeople and replace them with emotionless duplicates. Dr. Miles Bennell (McCarthy) is the first to discover the terrifying truth and is determined to stop the invasion from spreading any further. With the help of his colleague Becky Driscoll (Wynter) and a sympathetic psychiatrist (Jones), Miles embarks on a frantic race against time to save the townspeople from the insidious alien threat. This classic film has been praised for its frightening atmosphere, gripping suspense, and thought-provoking social commentary.

The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)

The Incredible Shrinking Man
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jack Arnold, starring Grant Williams, Randy Stuart, April Kent, Paul Langton
Rated Not Rated

The Incredible Shrinking Man is a 1957 science fiction film directed by Jack Arnold and starring Grant Williams. The movie follows the story of Scott Carey, a man who is exposed to a radioactive cloud and begins to rapidly shrink in size. As he grows smaller, he encounters numerous threats, including a household pet, a spider, and a venomous house cat. With each challenge, Scott must use his intelligence and resourcefulness to survive, as he continues to shrink in size until he is almost invisible. In the end, he learns to accept his fate and comes to terms with his new size. The film is a stark reminder of the fragility of life, and a thought-provoking exploration of mortality and the importance of the human condition.

Forbidden Planet (1956)

Forbidden Planet
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Fred M. Wilcox, starring Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens
Rated G

Forbidden Planet is a 1956 science fiction film directed by Fred M. Wilcox and produced by Nicholas Nayfack. The film follows a group of space explorers led by Commander John J. Adams (Leslie Nielsen) as they travel to the distant planet Altair IV in search of a missing scientist, Dr. Edward Morbius (Walter Pidgeon), and his daughter Altaira (Anne Francis). After arriving on the planet, the explorers soon discover that an unknown force has destroyed all of the planet's inhabitants except for Morbius and Altaira. After further investigation, the group finds that an ancient and powerful race known as the Krell has left behind advanced technology and that Morbius has been using it to create a paradise-like utopia on the planet, while also unlocking the secrets to immortality. But as they continue their investigation, they uncover a dark force that threatens to destroy them all - one that comes from the depths of Morbius's own mind. In the end, the expedition must battle the forces of nature and their own inner demons to save themselves and the planet.

Godzilla (1954)

Godzilla
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Ishirô Honda, starring Takashi Shimura, Akihiko Hirata, Akira Takarada, Momoko Kôchi
Rated Not Rated

Godzilla is a 1954 Japanese science fiction kaiju film directed and produced by Ishirô Honda. Based on an original story by Honda and Takeo Murata, the film stars Akira Takarada, Momoko Kōchi, Akihiko Hirata, and Takashi Shimura. The film follows a giant prehistoric amphibious reptilian monster, Godzilla, which is unleashed from the depths of the ocean by a nuclear test. Godzilla then begins a rampage that wreaks havoc across Japan, forcing the government and a group of scientists to look for a way to stop it. As the film progresses, Godzilla is revealed to be an ancient, powerful force of nature, and the film's human protagonists must find a way to stop it before it destroys Japan. The film was a major success in Japan, becoming a cultural phenomenon and spawning numerous sequels, remakes, and spin-offs.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Richard Fleischer, starring Kirk Douglas, James Mason, Paul Lukas, Peter Lorre
Rated G

The Fly (1958)

The Fly
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Kurt Neumann, starring David Hedison, Patricia Owens, Vincent Price, Herbert Marshall
Rated Not Rated

On the Beach (1959)

On the Beach
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kramer, starring Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, Fred Astaire, Anthony Perkins
Rated Approved

The War of the Worlds (1953)

The War of the Worlds
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Byron Haskin, starring Gene Barry, Ann Robinson, Les Tremayne, Robert Cornthwaite
Rated G

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

The Curse of Frankenstein
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Terence Fisher, starring Peter Cushing, Hazel Court, Robert Urquhart, Christopher Lee
Rated Approved

The Blob (1958)

The Blob
★★★★
★★★★
2.5 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Irvin S. Yeaworth Jr., Russell S. Doughten Jr., starring Steve McQueen, Aneta Corsaut, Earl Rowe, Olin Howland
Rated Approved

 



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