Weird Movies To Watch

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Weird Movies To Watch

Dozens of directors have explored Weird Movies To Watch. Here are 25 of the best ones.

The Shining (1980)

The Shining
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lloyd, Scatman Crothers
Rated R

The Shining is a horror film directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King. It stars Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Scatman Crothers, Danny Lloyd, and Barry Nelson. The story follows Jack Torrance, a writer and recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the winter caretaker of the isolated Overlook Hotel in the Colorado Rockies. Desperate to get away from his turbulent past, Jack moves his wife Wendy and son Danny to the hotel, but they soon find out that the hotel is haunted by both ghosts and the supernatural. As Jack slowly slips into a state of madness, Danny is terrorized by entities within the hotel, including a creepy twin girls, a demonic bear, and a mysterious old woman. In the end, Jack is driven to a murderous rage and Wendy and Danny must fight to survive.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 romantic science fiction drama film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Michel Gondry. It stars Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet as Joel and Clementine, two lovers who undergo a procedure to erase each other from their memories. Joel, heartbroken after Clementine abruptly ends their relationship, discovers that she had undergone the same procedure and decides to do the same. As the memories of their relationship are erased, the two re-discover their love for each other. Through a series of dreamlike flashbacks, Joel and Clementine's relationship is explored and the consequences of memory erasure are revealed.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is a 1968 science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick. The film follows a voyage to Jupiter with the sentient computer, HAL, aboard the spaceship Discovery One. The story is based in part on Arthur C. Clarke's short story "The Sentinel". It deals with themes of existentialism, artificial intelligence, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. The film follows a series of progressively mysterious events that lead to a confrontation between the artificial intelligence HAL and the human crew. As the story progresses, the crew is forced to confront the reality of their situation and their relationship with technology. The film ends with a metaphysical climax that has been the source of much debate among viewers and critics. The film is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential films of all time.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 British film directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. The film stars Malcolm McDowell as protagonist Alex DeLarge, a charismatic, sociopathic delinquent whose pleasures are classical music, rape, and ultra-violence. He leads a small gang of thugs (known as the Droogs) on a night of wanton destruction. After being arrested and jailed, Alex's innate depravity leads to further trouble. The government sees him as a victim of a mental illness and offers him an experimental treatment to "cure" him of his violent tendencies, at the expense of his own free will. The film is a darkly satirical exploration of the nature of free will and morality, set in a futuristic England. It remains one of the most controversial and influential films of all time.

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

Pan's Labyrinth
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Guillermo del Toro, starring Ivana Baquero, Ariadna Gil, Sergi López, Maribel Verdú
Rated R

Pan's Labyrinth is a dark fantasy drama set in 1944 fascist Spain. It follows the journey of a young girl named Ofelia, who discovers a magical world filled with strange creatures and obstacles. She must complete three dangerous tasks in order to reunite with her long lost father, the King of the Underworld. Along the way, Ofelia must confront the harsh reality of her stepfather's cruelty and the looming threat of a violent civil war. Through this journey, Ofelia discovers her inner resilience and the strength to make her own choices.

Groundhog Day (1993)

Groundhog Day
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott, Stephen Tobolowsky
Rated PG

Groundhog Day is a 1993 comedy-drama directed by Harold Ramis and starring Bill Murray as Phil Connors, a cynical TV weatherman who finds himself stuck in a time loop, living the same day over and over again. After a night of heavy drinking, he wakes up in the same bed to the same day. He soon realizes his predicament and decides to use his knowledge of the day to his advantage. Over the course of the movie, Phil begins to appreciate the little things in life, and ultimately learns how to be a better person. In the end, Phil is able to break the loop, and the film ends with him living a fuller, more meaningful life.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a 1966 Swedish psychological drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann. The story follows two women, a young nurse, Alma (Andersson) and her patient, an actress, Elisabet Vogler (Ullmann), who have seemingly switched personalities. As Elisabet refuses to speak, Alma gradually reveals her innermost thoughts, fears and dreams. Through a series of conversations and events, the two women explore their identities and search for understanding and acceptance. The film's themes of personal identity, guilt, and psychological trauma are explored in an atmosphere of intense symbolism and imagery.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is a psychological thriller that follows the story of Donnie, a troubled high school student living in the suburbs of Virginia in 1988. Donnie begins to experience visions of a giant, menacing rabbit named Frank who tells him the world is going to end in 28 days. As the days pass, Donnie begins to have a mental breakdown, engaging in increasingly dangerous behavior. He soon discovers that a jet engine has fallen through his bedroom and finds out that Frank was warning him of the impending doom of a parallel universe. Throughout the movie, Donnie must struggle to save his family and the world from destruction while trying to make sense of his own chaotic reality.

Black Swan (2010)

Black Swan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel, Winona Ryder
Rated R

Black Swan is a psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky that centers around a troubled ballerina, Nina (portrayed by Natalie Portman), who is competing for the lead role of the Swan Queen in a New York City production of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake. As Nina competes for the role, she finds herself in a dark world of obsession, manipulation, and physical and psychological distress. She is encouraged by her overly-demanding and emotionally-withholding mother, and overseen by her controlling ballet director, Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). As the pressure to perform builds, Nina is caught between her perfectionist pursuit of artistry and her own psychological demons, leading to a dangerous and terrifying climax.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Sidney Blackmer
Rated Approved

Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski. It follows Rosemary Woodhouse (Mia Farrow), a young wife and aspiring actress who is pregnant but begins to fear that her husband, Guy (John Cassavetes), may have made a pact with their neighbor, Minnie Castevet (Ruth Gordon), to give the baby to a Satanic cult in exchange for fame and fortune. Rosemary soon learns that Minnie and her husband Roman (Sidney Blackmer) are part of a coven of witches in league with the Devil and that her unborn child has been chosen as the devil's spawn. As the film progresses, Rosemary starts to realize that she is unable to protect her baby from the coven, and is forced to come to terms with her eventual fate. The film ends with Rosemary giving birth to the devil's spawn, and the coven rejoicing in their victory.

Love Exposure (2008)

Love Exposure
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sion Sono, starring Takahiro Nishijima, Hikari Mitsushima, Sakura Andô, Yutaka Shimizu
Rated Unrated

Love Exposure is a Japanese romantic comedy-drama film written and directed by Sion Sono. It follows Yu, a teenage boy, who is forced to become a vigilante photographer by his priest father in order to atone for his sins and win the heart of the girl he loves. Along the way, Yu discovers a hidden side to himself, and is forced to confront the dark side of religion and sexuality. The film explores themes of family, faith, identity, love, and redemption. It was one of the most critically acclaimed Japanese films of 2008, and has since become a cult classic.

Akira (1988)

Akira
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Katsuhiro Ôtomo, starring Mitsuo Iwata, Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, Tesshô Genda
Rated R

Akira is a 1988 Japanese animated cyberpunk action film directed by Katsuhiro Ôtomo and written by Ôtomo and Izo Hashimoto, based on Ôtomo’s manga of the same name. The film is set in a post-apocalyptic Neo-Tokyo in 2019, thirty-one years after an explosion destroys the city. The story follows a teenage biker gang leader, Shotaro Kaneda, as he tries to prevent his best friend Tetsuo Shima from being used in a government project that could unleash destructive forces beyond their comprehension. Along the way, they discover secrets about the project, as well as a powerful being known as Akira. The film is widely considered a landmark in anime and science fiction and was a massive box-office success, becoming the highest grossing anime film at the time.

Mulholland Drive (2001)

Mulholland Drive
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Jeanne Bates
Rated R

Mulholland Drive is a psychological mystery-thriller directed by David Lynch and starring Naomi Watts, Laura Elena Harring, Justin Theroux and Ann Miller. The story follows two women whose lives entangle when one of them, Rita, is left with amnesia after a car accident. Rita meets Betty, an aspiring actress, who takes her in and helps her try to remember her identity. As the two women search for clues to Rita's memory, they uncover a surreal and twisted web of secrets and deceptions that reveal the duality of Hollywood dreams and nightmares. The film is a complex and surreal exploration of identity, fate, and dreams that ultimately leads to an unexpected and shocking conclusion.

Brazil (1985)

Brazil
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Gilliam, starring Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond
Rated R

Brazil is a darkly comic dystopian tale set in an imagined future. It follows Sam Lowry, a daydreaming bureaucrat in a surreal, bureaucratic world, as he attempts to save a woman he has seen in his dreams from an unwanted fate. As his search for her leads him further and further away from the safety of his office cubicle, he begins to uncover a dark and sinister truth about his world. Along the way, he battles oppressive government forces, falls in love with the mysterious woman, and discovers a hidden world of magic and freedom. Both a political satire and an exploration of freedom and individualism, Brazil is an inventive and imaginative classic of modern cinema.

The Holy Mountain (1973)

The Holy Mountain
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Alejandro Jodorowsky, starring Alejandro Jodorowsky, Horacio Salinas, Zamira Saunders, Juan Ferrara
Rated R

The Holy Mountain is a 1973 surrealist film written, produced, and directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. It follows a Christ-like figure, The Thief, on his quest for spiritual enlightenment. Along the way, he encounters a group of nine wealthy and powerful individuals who represent aspects of society, including government and religion. After being invited to join them on a journey to the Holy Mountain to gain enlightenment, the Thief and the group undertake a series of bizarre and spiritual challenges. Through these challenges, they learn the secrets of existence and the meaning of life. The film has been widely acclaimed for its unique visual effects, symbolism, and metaphysical themes.

Being John Malkovich (1999)

Being John Malkovich
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, John Malkovich
Rated R

Being John Malkovich is a 1999 comedy-drama film directed by Spike Jonze and written by Charlie Kaufman. It stars John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, and John Malkovich. The film follows a down-on-his-luck puppeteer named Craig Schwartz (John Cusack) who finds a portal into the mind of actor John Malkovich (John Malkovich). Through the portal, Craig and his wife Lotte (Cameron Diaz) experience strange and surreal situations that bring them closer together. With the aid of his co-worker Maxine (Catherine Keener), Craig also uses the portal to gain fame and fortune by charging people to enter the mind of Malkovich for fifteen minutes. However, things get out of hand when the portal’s power begins to affect those involved, and Craig and Lotte must confront the implications of the portal before it’s too late. Being John Malkovich is a unique blend of comedy, surrealism, and drama that examines the complexities of human relationships, identity, and the desire for control.

The Fall (2006)

The Fall
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Tarsem Singh, starring Lee Pace, Catinca Untaru, Justine Waddell, Kim Uylenbroek
Rated R

"The Fall" is a 2006 fantasy drama directed by Tarsem Singh. The film follows Alexandria (Catinca Untaru), a young Romanian girl in a Los Angeles hospital in the 1920s. To pass the time while she recovers from a broken arm, Alexandria befriends Roy (Lee Pace), a paralyzed stuntman. Roy tells her a fantastical story of five mythical heroes who embark on a quest to avenge the death of a fallen king. As Alexandria helps Roy with his story, it begins to take on an exciting life of its own and the two of them form an unlikely bond. The film also features an all-star cast, including Justine Waddell, Kim Uylenbroek, and Julian Bleach. With its vivid visuals and poignant story, "The Fall" is an enchanting and powerful exploration of the power of storytelling and the strength of the human spirit.

Johnny Got His Gun (1971)

Johnny Got His Gun
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Dalton Trumbo, starring Timothy Bottoms, Kathy Fields, Marsha Hunt, Jason Robards
Rated R

Johnny Got His Gun is a 1971 anti-war film directed by Dalton Trumbo, based on his 1939 novel of the same name. The film follows Joe Bonham, a soldier who is severely injured in a trench during World War I. After losing both his arms, legs, and face, he is left without any means of communication. He is left in a state of limbo, unable to tell his doctors he is conscious and alive, and unable to end his life. Through a series of flashbacks, the film examines the horrors of war and its psychological toll on soldiers and their loved ones. The film serves as a powerful anti-war statement, emphasizing the importance of peace and understanding.

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Fernando Rey, Delphine Seyrig, Paul Frankeur, Bulle Ogier
Rated PG

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) is a surrealistic comedy by the Spanish director Luis Buñuel. The film follows a group of upper-class friends as they attempt to have a dinner together but are continuously thwarted by bizarre circumstances. Through a series of surrealistic dream sequences, the film takes a satirical look at the rituals and conventions of the bourgeoisie. The film's blend of comedy and surrealism leads to a commentary on the meaninglessness of social conventions and the ineffectual nature of upper-class life.

Blue Velvet (1986)

Blue Velvet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Laura Dern
Rated R

Blue Velvet is a 1986 American mystery thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. The film stars Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, and Laura Dern. The film centers around Jeffrey Beaumont (MacLachlan), a college student who returns to his small hometown after his father suffers a stroke. Whilst walking home, Jeffrey discovers a severed human ear in a field which sets off an investigation into a mystery involving a beautiful and mysterious nightclub singer, Frank Booth (Hopper), and the darkness lurking beneath the picturesque facade of his hometown. Along the way, Jeffrey is pulled into a world of violence, kinky sex and unexpected romance. As he unravels the mystery, Jeffrey finds himself locked in a dangerous love triangle between the singer and a beautiful and innocent high school student, Sandy Williams (Dern). As Jeffrey continues to unravel the mystery, he finds himself in a violent struggle against Frank and his twisted criminal cohorts. Eventually, Jeffrey is able to bring the criminal conspiracy to an end.

Waking Life (2001)

Waking Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Richard Linklater, starring Ethan Hawke, Trevor Jack Brooks, Lorelei Linklater, Wiley Wiggins
Rated R

Waking Life is a 2001 experimental animation/live-action film by director Richard Linklater. The film follows the journey of an unnamed protagonist (played by Wiley Wiggins) as he drifts through various dream-like scenarios and explores the nature of reality and existence. Along the way, he meets various people of different ages and backgrounds, each of whom offers a unique perspective on life and its many conundrums. The film is known for its unique animation style, which was created with rotoscope software, and its surrealistic and philosophical musings. Ultimately, the protagonist is left with more questions than answers, but his journey has nonetheless been a valuable one.

Fantastic Planet (1973)

Fantastic Planet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From René Laloux, starring Barry Bostwick, Jennifer Drake, Eric Baugin, Jean Topart
Rated PG

Fantastic Planet is a 1973 French/Czechoslovakian animated science-fiction film directed by René Laloux. It is set on a distant planet called Ygam, where blue-skinned humanoid aliens called Traags co-exist with a race of wild, humanoid-like creatures called Oms. These Oms are domesticated by the Traags and kept as pets. When a group of Oms escapes from captivity, they join forces with a group of rebel Oms to wage a rebellion against the oppressive Traag rulers. In the midst of their struggle, the Oms are aided by a mysterious ancient technology that allows them to commune with nature. In the end, the Oms succeed in achieving freedom, but at a cost. Themes of colonialism, oppression, and freedom are prominent throughout the film.

Adaptation. (2002)

Adaptation.
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring Nicolas Cage, Meryl Streep, Chris Cooper, Tilda Swinton
Rated R

Adaptation is a 2002 American comedy-drama film directed by Spike Jonze and written by Charlie Kaufman. The film is based on Susan Orlean's non-fiction book The Orchid Thief and focuses on screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) who is struggling to adapt the book into a screenplay. Along the way, he struggles with his lack of inspiration, his strained relationships, and his own twin brother, Donald (also played by Nicolas Cage). The film also stars Meryl Streep, Chris Cooper, Tilda Swinton, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Catherine Keener. The film follows Charlie as he attempts to write the screenplay, all while navigating his relationship with his twin brother, his girlfriend (Gyllenhaal), and his issues with insecurity and writer's block. As Charlie struggles through the process, he discovers that Orlean's book is more than just a story and begins to realize its potential to become a great film. In the end, he succeeds in creating a screenplay that is both fascinating and true to Orlean's work.

The Fly (1986)

The Fly
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From David Cronenberg, starring Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis, John Getz, Joy Boushel
Rated R

The Fly is a 1986 horror-drama film directed by David Cronenberg. An eccentric and reclusive scientist, Seth Brundle, invents a teleportation device that he tests on himself. However, when a housefly enters the teleportation chamber with him, the two become fused at the genetic level, and Brundle begins to slowly transform into a human/fly hybrid. As his body and mind rapidly deteriorate, Brundle struggles to maintain his humanity while his fiancée, Veronica Quaife, attempts to find a way to help him.

The Tenant (1976)

The Tenant
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Roman Polanski, Isabelle Adjani, Melvyn Douglas, Jo Van Fleet
Rated R

The Tenant is a psychological horror-drama directed by Roman Polanski. The film stars Polanski, who also co-wrote the screenplay, alongside Isabelle Adjani, Melvyn Douglas, and Shelley Winters. The story follows a meek French clerk named Trelkovsky (played by Polanski) who takes up residence in a Parisian apartment that has recently been vacated by a woman who had attempted to jump out the window. As he starts to explore his new home, Trelkovsky finds himself drawn into the strange and unsettling environment of the apartment building and the behavior of the other tenants. As his paranoia grows, Trelkovsky begins to believe that he is being watched and that he is slowly being driven mad by his neighbors. As the psychological tension rises, Trelkovsky is forced to confront the true nature of his identity and the events that led him to his current situation.

 



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