Surrealist Film

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Surrealist Film

Many creators have talked about Surrealist Film. Here are 19 of the top ones.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 psychological drama film directed by Darren Aronofsky. The film follows the downward spiral of four characters who each succumb to drug addiction, resulting in destructive and heartbreaking consequences. The main characters are Harry Goldfarb (Jared Leto), Tyrone C. Love (Marlon Wayans), Marion Silver (Jennifer Connelly), and Sara Goldfarb (Ellen Burstyn). Harry and Tyrone are best friends living in Brooklyn, and they both dream of becoming drug dealers. Marion is Harry's girlfriend, and Sara is a retired widow who watches television all day. All of them are tempted by the promise of quick money and easy success, but their dreams quickly become nightmares as their addictions take over. The film highlights the tragedy of addiction and the despair that comes along with it, as each of the characters falls deeper into their own self-destructive and heartbreaking journey.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 science fiction romantic comedy-drama film directed by Michel Gondry and written by Charlie Kaufman. The film follows a couple, Joel and Clementine, as they undergo a procedure to erase each other from their memories when their relationship turns sour, only to realize how important their relationship was to them. Joel, played by Jim Carrey, discovers that Clementine (Kate Winslet) has had all their shared memories of their turbulent relationship erased from her mind, and decides to undergo the same procedure. After the procedure, they meet again and discover that they have still fallen in love. The film explores the nature of memory, the impact of relationships and the importance of cherishing the moments that make up our lives.

Amélie (2001)

Amélie
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Pierre Jeunet, starring Audrey Tautou, Mathieu Kassovitz, Rufus, Lorella Cravotta
Rated R

Amélie is a 2001 French romantic comedy film directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. The film stars Audrey Tautou as Amélie Poulain, an innocent and naive girl in Paris with her own sense of justice. She decides to help those around her and, along the way, discovers love. After finding a long-hidden box of childhood mementos, Amélie embarks on a journey of self-discovery and adventure. Along the way, she plays matchmaker for her eccentric friends, helps a blind man find his way back to the right apartment, reunites a disapproving father with his estranged son, and discovers her own true love. In the end, Amélie finds happiness and fulfillment in her newfound understanding of her place in the world.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian crime film set in near-future Britain. The film follows Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the leader of a violent gang of teenagers, as he terrorizes the city with extreme violence and vandalism. After Alex is arrested and convicted of murder, he is brainwashed in an effort to remove his violent tendencies. He is then released back into the world, but unable to defend himself, he soon finds himself the target of his former victims. This film examines the consequences of using psychological manipulation to control behavior, and asks questions about the morality of using technology in such a way.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is a science fiction masterpiece directed by Stanley Kubrick. The film follows a voyage to Jupiter with the sentient computer HAL after the discovery of a mysterious black monolith affecting human evolution. The film is divided into four parts, starting with the prehistoric apes discovering the monolith, then the development of human technology, space exploration, and finally a cosmic voyage to discover the origin of the monolith. Along the way, the film explores themes of human evolution, technology, and the search for meaning and purpose in life. The film was revolutionary in its use of groundbreaking visual effects, innovative sound design, and poetic imagery, making it a classic of science fiction cinema.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a psychological drama directed by Ingmar Bergman. It focuses on the relationship between two women: Elisabet Vogler, a successful stage actress who has become inexplicably mute, and Alma, her nurse. Elisabet and Alma are both strong-willed and independent, yet their relationship shifts as Alma becomes increasingly drawn to Elisabet, pouring out her own secrets and seeking to understand the mysterious Elisabet. As the two women spend more time together, their identities begin to blur, and a powerful psychological game of cat and mouse begins to unfold. Through a series of dreamlike sequences, Bergman examines the nature of identity and the human need for connection.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Robert Wiene, starring Werner Krauss, Conrad Veidt, Friedrich Feher, Lil Dagover
Rated Not Rated

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is a silent horror film released in 1920 and directed by Robert Wiene. It tells the story of a mad scientist and his somnambulist, Cesare, who is controlled by Caligari and used to commit murders. The film follows Francis and his friend Alan as they investigate the murders, eventually discovering that Caligari is the mastermind behind them. In the climax of the film, Francis and Alan confront Caligari, and the villain is placed in an insane asylum. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is considered to be one of the first horror films and is widely regarded as a classic of the genre. Its unique expressionist style heavily influenced the horror genre, and it is often cited as one of the most important and influential films in the history of cinema.

Mulholland Drive (2001)

Mulholland Drive
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Jeanne Bates
Rated R

Mulholland Drive follows the story of a woman, Betty Elms (Naomi Watts), who arrives in Hollywood with aspirations of becoming a successful actress. She meets and befriends an amnesiac, Rita (Laura Harring), who is on the run from a dangerous group of individuals. As the two women unravel the mysteries of Rita’s past, Betty and Rita get caught up in a web of deceit, mystery, and murder. The film follows their journey through the nightmarish dreamscape of Los Angeles and its dark secrets, as they discover a shocking truth that will change both of their lives forever.

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Fernando Rey, Delphine Seyrig, Paul Frankeur, Bulle Ogier
Rated PG

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a surrealist dark comedy directed by Luis Buñuel. The film follows a group of upper-class friends who continually attempt to have a dinner party together, but are constantly thwarted by a series of absurd interruptions. The friends, whose lives are largely dominated by the rituals and conventions of their social class, are left to wander through a series of dream-like and hallucinatory episodes. Throughout this journey, they are confronted with various moral and ethical dilemmas, forcing them to confront the stereotypes and hypocrisies of their social class. Ultimately, the film serves as a scathing critique of bourgeois society and its conventions, as well as an exploration of the human need for stability, order, and meaning.

Being John Malkovich (1999)

Being John Malkovich
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, John Malkovich
Rated R

Being John Malkovich is a surreal dark comedy directed by Spike Jonze. The film follows Craig Schwartz (John Cusack), a struggling puppeteer who discovers a mysterious portal that leads into the mind of actor John Malkovich. Through the portal, individuals can experience life as Malkovich for 15 minutes before being ejected onto the New Jersey Turnpike. Craig decides to charge admission to the portal and creates a business out of it. Meanwhile, his wife Lotte (Catherine Keener) finds her own adventure when she falls in love with Maxine (Cameron Diaz), a woman she meets through the portal. Craig's life descends into chaos as he finds himself in a battle for control of the portal and his own identity. Along the way, the characters grapple with questions of identity, free will, and the meaning of life.

Belle de Jour (1967)

Belle de Jour
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Catherine Deneuve, Jean Sorel, Michel Piccoli, Geneviève Page
Rated R

Belle de Jour is a 1967 French-Italian drama film directed by Luis Buñuel and starring Catherine Deneuve. The film follows Séverine Serizy, a young and beautiful housewife who leads a secret double life as a prostitute. Despite seeming content with her marriage to a doctor, she finds herself drawn to a life of sexual freedom and exploration. As she struggles to reconcile her two lives, her two worlds collide in unexpected, often humorous, ways. The film also examines the power dynamics between men and women, as Séverine's power in one world is challenged by the power of men in the other. In the end, Séverine is left to find her own way in the ever-changing landscape of desire, morality and pleasure.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014)

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Alejandro G. Iñárritu, starring Michael Keaton, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Andrea Riseborough
Rated R

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) is a 2014 dark comedy film directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu. The movie follows the story of Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton), a washed-up actor who once starred as an iconic superhero in blockbuster movies. In a desperate attempt to revive his career, Riggan takes on a risky Broadway production that he has written, directed, and starring in. As opening night approaches and the pressure mounts, his sanity begins to unravel as he struggles to keep his cast and crew together. Throughout the movie, Riggan struggles with his inner demons, personal relationships, and his ego while trying to overcome the modern-day trappings of fame. Birdman is a unique story of an artist's determination to reclaim his identity and make an impact in a world that no longer values him.

Blue Velvet (1986)

Blue Velvet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Laura Dern
Rated R

Blue Velvet is a neo-noir psychological thriller directed by David Lynch and starring Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper and Laura Dern. The film follows the story of Jeffrey Beaumont, a college student who discovers a severed human ear in a field near his home. His investigation into the mystery leads him to a seedy underworld of crime and a complicated relationship with a troubled lounge singer. As Jeffrey's curiosity leads him deeper and deeper into the dark underworld of his small town, he discovers a world of depravity, violence and obsession. The film is a surreal exploration of the dark side of human nature, and has been cited as a major influence on the work of filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino.

An Andalusian Dog (1929)

An Andalusian Dog
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Pierre Batcheff, Simone Mareuil, Luis Buñuel, Pancho Cossío
Rated Not Rated

An Andalusian Dog is a short silent surrealist film directed by Luis Buñuel and co-directed by Salvador Dalí in 1929. With a running time of only 18 minutes, this film is considered a landmark of Surrealist cinema. The film follows a series of seemingly disconnected and chaotic scenes, featuring a razor slicing a hand, a man’s eye being cut open, an insect flying out of an eyeball, a statue turning into a woman, a man’s hand being chopped off, and a man being run over by a steamroller. All of these scenes are interlinked by a single Andalusian Dog, which serves as the film’s main theme. The surrealist nature of the film, as well as its comment on the absurdities of life, has earned it a place in the history of avant-garde cinema. The film has been widely praised for its cinematography, acting, and editing, and is celebrated as a masterpiece of early Surrealism.

Spellbound (1945)

Spellbound
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll
Rated Approved

Spellbound is a classic mystery-thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The story follows Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman), a psychoanalyst at a psychiatric institute, who is tasked with helping the mysterious amnesia victim John Ballantyne (Gregory Peck). As they work together to uncover the secrets of Ballantyne’s past, they soon find themselves caught in a sinister web of deceit, betrayal, and murder. The film features some of Hitchcock’s most iconic scenes and provides a brilliant exploration of psychology and the human mind. Spellbound is essential viewing for any fan of Hitchcock's work and the thriller genre.

Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Eyes Wide Shut
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Todd Field, Sydney Pollack
Rated R

Eyes Wide Shut is a psychological drama film directed by Stanley Kubrick. The story follows New York City physician Dr. Bill Harford (Tom Cruise), who embarks on a night-long adventure of sexual and moral discovery after his wife, Alice (Nicole Kidman), reveals that she had contemplated an affair a year earlier. During his journey, Bill encounters a prostitute, luxury underground parties, and supernatural forces. As he searches for answers, he begins to realize the complexity of relationships and the power of human desire. Ultimately, Bill learns the hard lesson that the grass isn't always greener on the other side.

Pi (1998)

Pi
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Sean Gullette, Mark Margolis, Ben Shenkman, Pamela Hart
Rated R

Eraserhead (1977)

Eraserhead
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Jack Nance, Charlotte Stewart, Allen Joseph, Jeanne Bates
Rated Not Rated

Mother! (2017)

Mother!
★★★★
★★★★
2.6 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Ed Harris, Michelle Pfeiffer
Rated R

 



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