The 60s Movie

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The 60s Movie

Thinking about The 60s Movie, there are many films who explored this idea. We found 25 of the best ones.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef, Aldo Giuffrè
Rated R

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a 1966 Italian-American Spaghetti Western film directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach. The film follows the three gunslingers as they search for a fortune in Confederate gold buried in a cemetery amidst the American Civil War. The trio face off against each other in a series of gunfights and plot twists as they try to outwit and outgun one another in order to get the gold. Along the way, the men must confront a variety of lawless elements, including an army of bounty hunters and an infamous gang of outlaws. In the end, only one of the three will claim the fortune and a number of lives will be lost in the pursuit of it.

Harakiri (1962)

Harakiri
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Masaki Kobayashi, starring Tatsuya Nakadai, Akira Ishihama, Shima Iwashita, Tetsurô Tanba
Rated Not Rated

Harakiri is a 1962 Japanese drama directed by Masaki Kobayashi. The film follows Hanshiro Tsugumo, an elderly samurai who arrives at the house of a feudal lord asking to commit ritual suicide on their grounds. After the lord refuses, Hanshiro reveals his true purpose—to avenge the death of his son-in-law, who was forced to commit ritual suicide after attempting to do so on the lord's land without permission. The lord's retainers try to dissuade him by showing him a video of the brutal punishment dealt to another samurai who attempted the same thing. Despite this, Hanshiro is determined and makes a stirring speech about the nature of samurai honor before going through with his plan. The film takes a dark turn as Hanshiro is successful in exacting his revenge, leaving the lord and his retainers to face the consequences of their actions.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a classic 1960 suspense-thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The film follows Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), a young woman who steals money from her employer and goes on the run. She winds up stopping for the night at the Bates Motel, owned by the mysterious Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins). As Marion's stay at the motel becomes more bizarre and unsettling, the audience slowly discovers the dark secrets of Bates and his strange relationship with his mother. The film culminates in an iconic climax that is sure to shock and surprise even today's viewers. Psycho has become an iconic classic and is widely recognized as one of Hitchcock's greatest works.

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

Once Upon a Time in the West
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards
Rated PG-13

Once Upon a Time in the West is a classic Western directed by legendary Italian filmmaker Sergio Leone. The film stars Charles Bronson, Henry Fonda, Jason Robards, and Claudia Cardinale. The story follows the struggles of a mysterious widow, Jill McBain (Cardinale), who is determined to take her late husband's land back from Frank (Fonda), a ruthless and powerful railroad tycoon. To protect her, she hires Harmonica (Bronson), a mysterious gunslinger with a personal vendetta against Frank. Meanwhile, the notorious outlaw Cheyenne (Robards) is determined to take the land for himself. In a series of epic showdowns, Harmonica and Cheyenne battle for the land, with Jill caught in the middle. In the end, the power of friendship, loyalty, and love triumphs over greed.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn
Rated PG

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 dark comedy directed by Stanley Kubrick. The film follows the story of a paranoid U.S. Air Force General Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) who orders a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union without authorization from the President, and the chaos that ensues as the President and his advisers, including the hawkish Brigadier General Jack D. Mandrake (Sellers) and the nuclear-war-loving Dr. Strangelove (Sellers) try to find a way to cancel the attack and prevent a full-scale nuclear holocaust. The film is a satirical look at the dangers of nuclear weapons, and the absurdity of Cold War politics.

High and Low (1963)

High and Low
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Akira Kurosawa, starring Toshirô Mifune, Yutaka Sada, Tatsuya Nakadai, Kyôko Kagawa
Rated Not Rated

High and Low is a 1963 classic crime drama directed by Akira Kurosawa. The film tells the story of a successful businessman, Kingo Gondo, who is held to ransom by a criminal gang. Gondo must choose between sacrificing his entire fortune to save a child he has never met, or turning his back on the innocent victim and saving himself. The film is divided into two distinct halves. The first half follows Gondo and his family as they negotiate with the gang, while the second half follows the police investigation into the kidnapping. As the story progresses, Gondo is forced to make a difficult moral decision as he weighs up the cost of saving the child versus sacrificing his own wealth. High and Low is a suspenseful, morally complex film featuring Kurosawa's signature visual style. It is a must-see for fans of classic Japanese cinema.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is an epic science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick, written in collaboration with Arthur C. Clarke, and released in 1968. The film follows a voyage to Jupiter and its five-million-year-old alien monolith, which is discovered on the moon. It deals with themes of existentialism, human evolution, technology, and artificial intelligence. The story is told mostly in a non-linear fashion, and follows the crew of the spaceship Discovery One, which is sent to investigate the monolith. During their journey, they encounter a powerful artificial intelligence, HAL 9000, who turns homicidal and attempts to thwart their mission. The film culminates in a climactic battle of wills between human and machine, where the crew is ultimately able to disconnect HAL and complete the mission. The film is noted for its groundbreaking visual effects and deep philosophical themes, and is considered one of the greatest films ever made.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Lawrence of Arabia
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lean, starring Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins
Rated Approved

Lawrence of Arabia is a sweeping epic about the extraordinary life of T.E. Lawrence, a British army officer who united the Arab tribes during World War I to fight against the Ottoman Empire. The film follows Lawrence as he traverses the Arabian desert and becomes an iconic leader of the Arab Revolt. As Lawrence faces relentless obstacles, his courage and determination leave a lasting impression on those around him. Through a combination of stunning cinematography, intense battle sequences, and an unforgettable soundtrack, Lawrence of Arabia is an iconic classic.

The Apartment (1960)

The Apartment
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Billy Wilder, starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray, Ray Walston
Rated Approved

The Apartment tells the story of C.C. Baxter, an ambitious young office worker who allows his corporate bosses to use his apartment for their extramarital affairs. In exchange, Baxter is given promotions and special favors. When Baxter falls in love with Fran Kubelik, the mistress of his boss, he is forced to confront the ugly side of his ambition and the morality of his situation. With the help of his doctor and neighbor, Baxter learns to take a stand and finds the courage to put his moral values before his career aspirations.

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

To Kill a Mockingbird
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Robert Mulligan, starring Gregory Peck, John Megna, Frank Overton, Rosemary Murphy
Rated Approved

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) is a classic American film directed by Robert Mulligan and starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch. Set in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the 1930s, the film follows Atticus, a lawyer and widower, as he defends a black man, Tom Robinson, against an accusation of rape by a white woman. As the trial goes on, Atticus and his children, Scout and Jem, must confront the town's prejudice and racism. The story of To Kill a Mockingbird is ultimately one of justice, morality, and compassion as Atticus teaches his children the importance of seeing things from another's perspective.

The Great Escape (1963)

The Great Escape
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From John Sturges, starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson
Rated Approved

The Great Escape is a classic World War II epic from 1963, directed by John Sturges and starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, and Richard Attenborough. The film follows a group of Allied prisoners of war, mostly British and American, as they attempt an ambitious plan to escape from a German POW camp during World War II. It quickly becomes a race against time as the Nazi guards search for the escapees, with the prisoners relying on their ingenuity and courage to survive. As the prisoners embark on their daring escape, they must confront a variety of obstacles, including hostile terrain, dangerous tunnels, and ruthless Gestapo officers. In the end, only a fraction of the escapees make it to safety, but their daring attempt has become an enduring symbol of courage and daring.

For a Few Dollars More (1965)

For a Few Dollars More
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Gian Maria Volontè, Mara Krupp
Rated R

For a Few Dollars More is a classic spaghetti western directed by Sergio Leone and released in 1965. The film stars Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef as two rival bounty hunters who join forces to track down the infamous criminal El Indio. Along the way, they are joined by a beautiful young woman who helps them in their quest for justice. As the two hunt down El Indio, they must outwit his gang of ruthless henchmen in a series of thrilling and dangerous showdowns. In the end, the two bounty hunters must decide whether or not to work together to rid the town of El Indio and his gang. The film is considered to be one of the best spaghetti westerns ever made, and it continues to be a classic of the genre.

Yojimbo (1961)

Yojimbo
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Akira Kurosawa, starring Toshirô Mifune, Eijirô Tôno, Tatsuya Nakadai, Yôko Tsukasa
Rated Not Rated

Yojimbo, directed by Akira Kurosawa and released in 1961, is a classic samurai film set in the late 1800s. It follows the story of Sanjuro, a masterless samurai who finds himself in a small town divided by two warring factions. Sanjuro sees a chance to make some money and takes it, playing both sides to his advantage. He eventually succeeds in outsmarting both gangs, bringing peace to the town and restoring order. Along the way, he also befriends a young woman who helps him in his quest. Yojimbo is an action-packed adventure with a unique twist, proving to be an enduring classic of the samurai genre.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a 1966 Swedish psychological drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman and starring Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann. It follows the story of nurse Alma and her patient, Elisabet, a famous stage actress who has suddenly stopped speaking. As the film progresses, the two women become increasingly intertwined, with Alma becoming increasingly aware of Elisabet’s inner turmoil and past. Alma begins to assume Elisabet’s identity and the two become one. Ultimately, Persona is a profound meditation on identity, reality, and self-discovery.

The Sound of Music (1965)

The Sound of Music
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Robert Wise, starring Julie Andrews, Christopher Plummer, Eleanor Parker, Richard Haydn
Rated G

The Sound of Music is a classic 1965 American musical film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The film is based on the real-life story of the Von Trapp Family and their escape from Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938. The film follows Maria, a young woman appointed as governess to the seven children of the widowed Captain Von Trapp. As Maria teaches the children music and helps them discover a love of life, she also falls in love with the Captain and eventually marries him. When Austria is annexed by the Nazis, the family is forced to flee the country. After a risky journey to Switzerland, they are able to find refuge and freedom. The film features memorable songs such as “My Favorite Things,” “Do-Re-Mi,” “Sixteen Going on Seventeen,” and “Edelweiss.” The Sound of Music was a critical and box office success, winning the Academy Award for Best Picture and making it one of the most beloved musical films of all time.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

The Battle of Algiers
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Samia Kerbash
Rated Not Rated

The Battle of Algiers is a 1966 Italian-Algerian film directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. It depicts the events that took place during the Algerian War of Independence against the French government in the 1950s. The film follows a group of Algerian freedom fighters who fight for their independence, with their main tactic being the use of guerrilla warfare. As the film progresses, the conflict between the two sides intensifies, with the French using increasingly brutal tactics to try and quell the rebellion. Ultimately, the film shows the Algerians triumphing over the French and establishing their independence. The Battle of Algiers is considered a landmark in cinematic history and is known for its realistic portrayal of the conflict.

Cool Hand Luke (1967)

Cool Hand Luke
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Stuart Rosenberg, starring Paul Newman, George Kennedy, Strother Martin, J.D. Cannon
Rated GP

Cool Hand Luke is a 1967 American prison drama film directed by Stuart Rosenberg, starring Paul Newman, George Kennedy, and Strother Martin. The film tells the story of Lucas "Luke" Jackson, a prisoner in a Florida prison camp who refuses to conform to the rules of the camp, leading to his eventual death. Luke's charismatic and rebellious attitude towards authority gains him both respect and admiration from his fellow inmates, as well as the ire of the prison guards. The film's themes include the individual's struggle against authority, the willingness of people to conform, and the power of friendship and loyalty. Ultimately, Luke's rebellious attitude and dedication to his friends earns him the respect and admiration of everyone in the camp.

Army of Shadows (1969)

Army of Shadows
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Pierre Melville, starring Lino Ventura, Paul Meurisse, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Simone Signoret
Rated Not Rated

Army of Shadows is a 1969 French-Italian war drama film directed by Jean-Pierre Melville. Set during World War II, the story follows a small group of French Resistance fighters who are struggling to survive in Occupied France. Led by Philippe Gerbier (Lino Ventura), the group engages in dangerous missions to sabotage the Nazi war machine and help Allied forces. Despite the odds, their courage and dedication to the cause never wavers. With the help of the secretive and powerful organization of the French Resistance, the group is able to survive and eventually triumph. The film is a powerful and intense depiction of the struggles faced by the French resistance fighters and the cost of freedom.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From John Ford, starring James Stewart, John Wayne, Vera Miles, Lee Marvin
Rated Approved

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance is a 1962 American Western film directed by John Ford, starring James Stewart, John Wayne and Vera Miles. The movie follows a young lawyer, Ranse Stoddard (James Stewart), who arrives in the small town of Shinbone, Arizona. He is determined to bring law and order to the town and takes a stand against the ruthless and feared rancher, Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin). However, when Liberty Valance threatens to kill Stoddard, a mysterious gunfighter, Tom Doniphon (John Wayne), intervenes and kills Liberty Valance in a gunfight. In the aftermath, Stoddard becomes a hero and is elected senator. Later, in a remarkable twist, it is revealed that Doniphon was the one who actually shot Liberty Valance, and Stoddard decides to keep the truth hidden. The movie ends with Stoddard, now a respected senator, returning to Shinbone to pay his respects to Doniphon’s memory.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Sidney Blackmer
Rated Approved

Rosemary's Baby is a psychological horror film released in 1968, directed by Roman Polanski. The film follows Rosemary Woodhouse and her husband Guy, as they move into a New York City apartment building with a dark and mysterious past. Rosemary soon learns that her elderly neighbors are part of a Satanic cult and are plotting to use her unborn child for their own sinister purposes. As Rosemary's pregnancy progresses and Guy's behavior becomes increasingly strange, she begins to suspect that she is the victim of an ancient cult ritual. As she struggles for her sanity and her baby's safety, Rosemary must confront her deepest fear – that her own husband is part of the cult and has doomed them both.

8½ (1963)

8½
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Federico Fellini, starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimée, Claudia Cardinale, Sandra Milo
Rated Not Rated

8½ is a surrealistic comedy-drama film by Italian director Federico Fellini. It stars Marcello Mastroianni as a famous film director who is struggling with an existential crisis. He is trying to make a film, but he is unable to concentrate, continually distracted by his thoughts, memories, and fantasies. As he deals with his creative struggles, he also wrestles with his relationships with his current wife, his mistress, and his former wives. The film is considered a cinematic masterpiece and one of Fellini's greatest works. It has been hailed for its experimental nature, its poignant portrayal of the artist's creative dilemma, and its fluid, dream-like visuals.

Planet of the Apes (1968)

Planet of the Apes
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Franklin J. Schaffner, starring Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter, Maurice Evans
Rated G

Planet of the Apes (1968) is a science fiction film directed by Franklin J. Schaffner and based on the 1963 novel of the same name by Pierre Boulle. The film follows an astronaut crew who crash-land on a planet in the distant future where intelligent talking apes are the dominant species and humans are the oppressed and enslaved. The astronauts, led by George Taylor (Charlton Heston), soon discover a world where apes are in control and humans are treated as inferior creatures. With the help of two sympathetic apes, Cornelius (Roddy McDowall) and Zira (Kim Hunter), Taylor attempts to soften the attitudes of the ruling ape society and free the human race from its cruel subjugation. The film is a gripping tale of oppression and heroism and features groundbreaking visual effects and makeup that remain iconic today.

The Graduate (1967)

The Graduate
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Mike Nichols, starring Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross, William Daniels
Rated PG

The Graduate is a 1967 American comedy-drama film directed by Mike Nichols and written by Buck Henry and Calder Willingham, based on the 1963 novel of the same name by Charles Webb. The film tells the story of Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman), a recent college graduate with no well-defined aim in life, who is seduced by an older woman, Mrs. Robinson (Anne Bancroft), and then falls in love with her daughter Elaine (Katharine Ross). Benjamin eventually learns that Mrs. Robinson's intentions are not honorable and he must decide between having an affair with her or pursuing his relationship with Elaine. Along the way, Benjamin must confront his insecurities and the expectations of his parents and society. The Graduate is a coming-of-age film which celebrates youth culture and rebellion against social norms.

La dolce vita (1960)

La dolce vita
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Federico Fellini, starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimée, Yvonne Furneaux
Rated Not Rated

La Dolce Vita is a 1960 Italian art-house classic directed by Federico Fellini. It tells the story of a week in the life of Marcello Rubini, a tabloid journalist living in Rome. The film follows Marcello as he and his friends move through the hip Roman nightlife, and the opulence and decadence that come with it. Along the way, Marcello grapples with questions of faith, morality, and the meaning of life. Through surreal and sometimes nightmarish imagery, La Dolce Vita paints a portrait of 1960s Italian society, while also exploring universal themes of freedom, desire, and the search for meaning.

The Hustler (1961)

The Hustler
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Robert Rossen, starring Paul Newman, Jackie Gleason, Piper Laurie, George C. Scott
Rated Not Rated

The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film directed by Robert Rossen and starring Paul Newman as "Fast" Eddie Felson, Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats, Piper Laurie as Sarah Packard, and George C. Scott as Bert Gordon. The film follows Eddie, a small-time pool hustler, as he strives to become a top player in the world of professional pool. Along the way, he must face off against the legendary Minnesota Fats, and also fights his own inner demons. Through his struggles, Eddie discovers the true nature of his character and the importance of self-respect. The film was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Supporting Actor.

 



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