Movies On Netflix About Mental Illness

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Movies On Netflix About Mental Illness

Have you heard all of these Movies On Netflix About Mental Illness? We guarantee you'll find some new films. Here are 25 of the top ones.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Tom Hanks as the titular character, a slow-witted but kind-hearted man from Alabama who witnesses and inadvertently influences several defining historical events in the 20th century in the United States. The story follows Forrest Gump's epic journey of self-discovery as he experiences life's defining moments, including serving in the Vietnam War, meeting John F. Kennedy, becoming a successful businessman, and falling in love with his childhood sweetheart, Jenny. Throughout his journey, he encounters a variety of colorful characters, such as Lt. Dan, Bubba, and Lieutenant Dan's father, and learns valuable lessons about love, friendship, and destiny. The film was a massive box office success, grossing over $677 million worldwide and winning six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Tom Hanks. The film also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama and was nominated for several other awards, including several BAFTA Awards. It is widely considered one of the greatest films of all time.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Miloš Forman, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey. It stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a criminal who is sent to a mental institution for evaluation. While there, he rallies the other patients to take on the oppressive Nurse Ratched, and leads them on a revolt against the rules of the institution. The film also stars Louise Fletcher, Brad Dourif, Danny DeVito, Christopher Lloyd, and Will Sampson. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Nicholson), Best Actress (Fletcher), Best Director (Forman), and Best Adapted Screenplay.

It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

It's a Wonderful Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Capra, starring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Thomas Mitchell
Rated PG

It's a Wonderful Life is a classic Christmas movie directed by Frank Capra. It follows the story of George Bailey, a young man living in the small town of Bedford Falls. He dreams of leaving and seeing the world, but his plans are put on hold when he is forced to take over his father's business and worry about his family's future. After a series of unfortunate events, George finds himself on the brink of suicide on Christmas Eve. It is then that his guardian angel, Clarence, intervenes and shows him what life would have been like if he had never been born. This experience helps George to appreciate the life he has and all of his accomplishments, and he is ultimately able to make everything right. The film is remembered for its uplifting message about the power of kindness and compassion, and its powerful ending is often cited as one of the greatest in film history.

Apocalypse Now (1979)

Apocalypse Now
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Frederic Forrest
Rated R

Apocalypse Now is a war epic directed by Francis Ford Coppola and released in 1979. The film follows a US Army officer, Captain Benjamin Willard (Martin Sheen), as he is tasked with a dangerous mission to "terminate with extreme prejudice" an rogue American colonel, Walter Kurtz (Marlon Brando), who has gone insane in the jungles of Cambodia. Willard's journey takes him up the Nung River, into the heart of darkness, accompanied by a small crew of soldiers. Along the way he encounters a variety of characters, including a crazed US Air Cavalry commander (Robert Duvall) and an exotic French plantation owner (Dennis Hopper). Willard's moral descent along his odyssey is paralleled with the chaos and destruction in the Vietnam War. Ultimately, he must confront his own inner demons in order to accomplish his mission.

Memento (2000)

Memento
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Guy Pearce, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, Mark Boone Junior
Rated R

Memento is a critically acclaimed neo-noir psychological thriller film written and directed by Christopher Nolan. The film follows Leonard (Guy Pearce), a man with anterograde amnesia, as he attempts to avenge his wife's murder by searching for her killer. Leonard is unable to store new memories for more than a few minutes, so he uses a system of Polaroid photographs, notes, and tattoos to help him remember facts and events as he searches for his wife's killer. Along the way, he finds himself embroiled in a deeper mystery involving his amnesia, his trustworthy friend Teddy (Joe Pantoliano), and a strange man named Sammy Jankis (Stephen Tobolowsky). Memento is told in a non-linear fashion, alternating between scenes that move the story forward in time and scenes that move it backward, thus leaving the audience to piece together the story as they go along.

Joker (2019)

Joker
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Todd Phillips, starring Joaquin Phoenix, Robert De Niro, Zazie Beetz, Frances Conroy
Rated R

Joker is a psychological crime drama set in Gotham City during the early 1980s. It follows the story of Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a failed stand-up comedian who is driven insane by societal rejection and a broken mental health system. After being fired from his day job, Arthur falls into a spiral of despair, eventually embracing his darker side and becoming the infamous criminal Joker. As Arthur's transformation continues, he is driven to become a symbol of chaos and rebellion against a crumbling society, sparking a revolution in the process. The film explores the idea of mental illness, social injustice, and the struggle of an individual to find their own identity.

Good Will Hunting (1997)

Good Will Hunting
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Gus Van Sant, starring Robin Williams, Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, Stellan Skarsgård
Rated R

Good Will Hunting is a 1997 American drama film directed by Gus Van Sant, and starring Robin Williams, Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and Minnie Driver. The film follows Will Hunting (Damon), a genius from a poor working-class background who has a talent for mathematics, but is haunted by his troubled past. When professor Gerald Lambeau (Stellan Skarsgård) discovers Will's talents, he encourages him to apply his skills to his studies and to accept guidance from the professor's therapist colleague, Sean McGuire (Williams). As Will and Sean work together, they explore Will's deep-seated and unresolved issues of abandonment and abuse. Ultimately, they help Will to understand himself, to recognize and embrace his potential, and to take responsibility for his own future.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 psychological drama directed by Darren Aronofsky. It stars Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans, and Ellen Burstyn. The film follows the intertwined lives of four characters living in Brooklyn, as they succumb to their addictions and dreams of success. Harry, Sara, Tyrone, and Marion are each struggling with their personal demons, and their attempts to escape reality only lead them further down a path of self-destruction and despair. The movie shows the devastating consequences of drug addiction, and the lengths people will go to in pursuit of their dreams. Ultimately, it is a powerful reflection on the harsh realities of life, and the difficulty of finding hope in hopelessness.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 biographical drama directed by Ron Howard and based on the life of Nobel Prize-winning economist and mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr. The film stars Russell Crowe as Nash and Jennifer Connelly as his wife Alicia. The film follows Nash's journey as he develops revolutionary theories in the field of game theory and economics, and his struggle with mental illness. Nash is diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and is sent to a mental hospital for treatment. With the support of Alicia, Nash's friends, and the staff at the hospital, he slowly begins to recover and is eventually able to return to teaching. The film examines Nash's life, his accomplishments, and his struggles both with his illness and with the people around him. It is ultimately a story of courage and perseverance in the face of adversity, and a reminder that a person can overcome great challenges.

Shutter Island (2010)

Shutter Island
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley
Rated R

Shutter Island is a psychological thriller film starring Leonardo DiCaprio, directed by Martin Scorsese. The story follows U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels (DiCaprio) and his partner Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo) as they investigate an asylum on the remote Shutter Island. The Marshals are looking into the mysterious disappearance of a patient, but they soon discover a more disturbing truth about the asylum and its inhabitants. As Teddy starts to uncover the sinister secrets of the island, he begins to question his own sanity and his beliefs about reality. As the investigation continues, Teddy is plunged into a world of delusion and deception, as he is forced to confront his own inner demons. The movie is an intense exploration of how far someone will go to escape reality and the consequences of doing so. With its twists and turns, Shutter Island keeps viewers on the edge of their seats and is a must-watch for fans of psychological thrillers.

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks
Rated R

Taxi Driver is a 1976 psychological thriller directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro as Travis Bickle, a taxi driver in a seedy, crime-ridden New York City. Reeling from a series of rejections and a sense of isolation, Travis begins to lose his grip on reality and descends into a violent spiral of rage and desperation. His descent culminates in an attempt to assassinate a presidential candidate, and a violent confrontation with a pimp and his gang. Ultimately, Travis is saved from his own darkness by a 12-year-old prostitute, who he tries to save from her dangerous life. The movie is a powerful exploration of alienation and isolation, and is considered one of the most influential films of the 1970s.

Rain Man (1988)

Rain Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Barry Levinson, starring Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise, Valeria Golino, Gerald R. Molen
Rated R

Rain Man is a 1988 drama directed by Barry Levinson and starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. Cruise plays Charlie Babbitt, an unsuccessful and troubled car dealer who discovers that his estranged father has recently died and left his entire fortune to his other son, Raymond (Hoffman), an autistic savant. In an effort to get his hands on the money, Charlie kidnaps Raymond and takes him on a cross-country journey of discovery and reconciliation. Along the way, Charlie learns more about his brother, autism, and himself, ultimately finding that he doesn’t need the money to be happy—he just needs Raymond’s companionship. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Director, and Best Actor for Hoffman.

Black Swan (2010)

Black Swan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel, Winona Ryder
Rated R

Black Swan is a psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky. The story follows Nina (Natalie Portman), a dedicated ballerina in a prestigious New York City ballet company, as she is cast in the lead role for their upcoming production of Swan Lake. As she works towards perfecting her role as the Swan Queen, she begins to succumb to the pressure and her own insecurities, and her grip on reality starts to unravel. Her journey leads her down a dark and dangerous path, as her rival (Mila Kunis) and her own obsessive drive threaten to consume her.

Short Term 12 (2013)

Short Term 12
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Destin Daniel Cretton, starring Brie Larson, Frantz Turner, John Gallagher Jr., Kaitlyn Dever
Rated R

Short Term 12 is a 2013 American independent drama film written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton. The film stars Brie Larson as Grace, a young supervisor at a foster care facility for at-risk teenagers, many of whom are dealing with physical, mental, and emotional abuse, as well as the effects of abandonment. Alongside Larson, the film stars John Gallagher Jr., Kaitlyn Dever, Rami Malek, Stephanie Beatriz, and Lakeith Stanfield. The film follows the lives of the staff at the facility, and focuses on the relationship between Grace and Mason, a troubled teenager who has been placed in the facility. As Grace and Mason's relationship grows, Grace must deal with her own issues and confront her past as she helps Mason and the other teenagers. The film explores themes of love, family, and loss.

Ordinary People (1980)

Ordinary People
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Robert Redford, starring Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore, Judd Hirsch, Timothy Hutton
Rated R

Ordinary People is a 1980 American drama film directed by Robert Redford, and starring Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore, Judd Hirsch and Timothy Hutton. Set in Lake Forest, Illinois, the film tells the story of the Jarretts, a suburban family struggling to come to terms with the death of their older son, Buck, in a boating accident. The film follows the family as they attempt to cope with their grief, while also trying to manage their relationships with each other. The film follows Conrad (Hutton), the younger son, who is struggling with depression, as well as his strained relationship with his parents, Cal (Sutherland) and Beth (Moore). As the family's struggles become more evident, they eventually seek help from a family therapist, Dr. Berger (Hirsch). Through their conversations, the family learns to accept their feelings and move forward. The film was a critical and commercial success, receiving six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actor for Hutton, who won for his role. It was praised for its sensitive portrayal of a family coping with grief, and its honest and realistic approach to mental health.

What's Eating Gilbert Grape (1993)

What's Eating Gilbert Grape
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Lasse Hallström, starring Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis, Mary Steenburgen
Rated PG-13

What's Eating Gilbert Grape is a 1993 drama film directed by Lasse Hallström and starring Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis and Mary Steenburgen. The movie follows Gilbert Grape (Depp), a young man living in a small town in Iowa who is struggling to take care of his mentally disabled brother Arnie (DiCaprio) and his obese mother Bonnie (Steenburgen). Gilbert works in a local grocery store and dreams of escaping his mundane life and exploring the world. His plans are interrupted when a young runaway named Becky (Lewis) arrives in town, and Gilbert forms a bond with her. The story follows Gilbert's struggles to keep his family together while trying to make a life for himself.

The Machinist (2004)

The Machinist
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Brad Anderson, starring Christian Bale, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Aitana Sánchez-Gijón, John Sharian
Rated R

The Machinist is a psychological thriller film directed by Brad Anderson and starring Christian Bale. It tells the story of Trevor Reznik (Bale), an insomniac machinist whose sleep deprivation has left him severely emaciated and delusional. Struggling to remember the events of the past year, Trevor's paranoia and suspicion of his co-workers lead him to believe that he is being framed for a horrific crime. After a series of inexplicable events and a chance encounter with a mysterious young stranger, Trevor’s life begins to unravel and he is forced to confront the shocking truth about himself. The Machinist is a haunting, psychological thriller that explores the depths of paranoia and guilt, and the power of self-forgiveness.

As Good as It Gets (1997)

As Good as It Gets
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James L. Brooks, starring Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear, Cuba Gooding Jr.
Rated PG-13

As Good as It Gets is a 1997 romantic comedy-drama directed by James L. Brooks and starring Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear and Cuba Gooding Jr. The film follows Melvin Udall, an obsessive-compulsive novelist and misanthropic, who is forced to confront his own psychological issues in order to sustain a growing relationship with a single mother and waitress, Carol Connelly. Melvin's life is further complicated when his gay neighbor, Simon Bishop, is hospitalized and Melvin is forced to care for his dog and confront his homophobia. The film culminates with Melvin and Carol's newfound love, and the resolution of Melvin's personal issues.

Shine (1996)

Shine
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Scott Hicks, starring Geoffrey Rush, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Justin Braine, Sonia Todd
Rated PG-13

Shine is a 1996 biographical drama directed by Scott Hicks that tells the story of pianist David Helfgott, who suffered a mental breakdown and spent years in a psychiatric hospital. After his release, he re-emerges as a talented musician. The film follows Helfgott's journey as he overcomes his demons, reclaims his passion, and establishes himself as a world-renowned concert pianist. Through his struggles and accomplishments, Helfgott seeks to prove to the world—and himself—that he can be anything he wants to be and that anything is possible.

I Am Sam (2001)

I Am Sam
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jessie Nelson, starring Sean Penn, Michelle Pfeiffer, Dakota Fanning, Dianne Wiest
Rated PG-13

I Am Sam is a 2001 drama film directed by Jessie Nelson and starring Sean Penn, Michelle Pfeiffer, Dianne Wiest and Laura Dern. The story revolves around Sam Dawson (Penn), an intellectually-disabled father, who is desperately trying to raise his daughter, Lucy (Dakota Fanning), on his own. When Lucy's extraordinary intelligence is discovered by the authorities, Sam must fight for their right to stay together and prove to the world that love is truly all you need. Through his journey, Sam finds strength in the love of his friends and family, and discovers the power of unconditional love and acceptance.

The Peanut Butter Falcon (2019)

The Peanut Butter Falcon
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Tyler Nilson, Michael Schwartz, starring Zack Gottsagen, Ann Pierce, Dakota Johnson, Bruce Dern
Rated PG-13

The Peanut Butter Falcon is a 2019 adventure-drama film directed by Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz and starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, and Zack Gottsagen. The film tells the story of Zak (Gottsagen), a 22-year-old man with Down Syndrome, who runs away from his nursing home and embarks on a wild adventure with Tyler (LaBeouf), a small-time outlaw. During their journey, they meet a variety of characters, including Eleanor (Johnson), a kind-hearted caretaker, and Mary (John Hawkes), a crab fisherman. Along the way, Zak and Tyler build a strong bond and confront their own inner demons as they make their way to a professional wrestling school, which Zak dreams of joining. The film is a delightful, heartwarming look at friendship, self-discovery, and the importance of never giving up on your dreams.

The Aviator (2004)

The Aviator
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Cate Blanchett, Kate Beckinsale, John C. Reilly
Rated PG-13

The Aviator is a 2004 biographical drama directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio as the larger-than-life aviator and film producer Howard Hughes. The film follows Hughes' life from the late 1920s up until the 1940s, during which time he became a successful film producer, a record-breaking aviator, and a business magnate. Despite his success and wealth, Hughes' life is plagued by his obsessive-compulsive disorder, which leads to frequent breakdowns. The film portrays Hughes' struggles with his mental illness, his relationships with actresses Katharine Hepburn and Ava Gardner, and his rivalry with fellow businessman Pan Am's founder Juan Trippe. The Aviator ultimately chronicles Hughes' rise and fall as an influential figure during the golden age of Hollywood.

We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011)

We Need to Talk About Kevin
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Lynne Ramsay, starring Tilda Swinton, John C. Reilly, Ezra Miller, Jasper Newell
Rated R

We Need to Talk About Kevin tells the story of Eva, a mother struggling to come to terms with the horrific act her son Kevin has committed. Through a series of flashbacks, we see glimpses of Kevin's childhood, from his difficult temperament as a baby to his increasingly violent behavior as a teenager. Eva finds herself unable to connect with her son, who becomes increasingly isolated and resentful. As Kevin grows older, it becomes increasingly clear that he is growing more and more troubled, and Eva struggles to understand his behavior. Eventually, all of the tension leads to a tragedy, and Eva must confront the reality of her son's actions and her own role in it all.

Still Alice (2014)

Still Alice
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Richard Glatzer, Wash Westmoreland, starring Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart, Kate Bosworth
Rated PG-13

Still Alice is a 2014 drama film directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland. It stars Julianne Moore as Alice Howland, a renowned linguistics professor diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. As her condition worsens and the effects of the disease take over her life, Alice and her family must learn to cope and adjust. The film also stars Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart, Kate Bosworth, and Hunter Parrish, among others. The film received wide critical acclaim, with many praising Moore's performance. It won numerous awards, including an Academy Award for Best Actress for Moore. Still Alice is a heart-wrenching and emotional story of a family dealing with the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease.

Sophie's Choice (1982)

Sophie's Choice
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Alan J. Pakula, starring Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, Peter MacNicol, Rita Karin
Rated R

Sophie's Choice is a 1982 American drama film directed by Alan J. Pakula, and starring Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, and Peter MacNicol. Adapted from William Styron's novel of the same name, the film follows Sophie (Streep), a survivor of the Holocaust, as she struggles with her past while living in Brooklyn in 1947. After a chance encounter with Stingo (Kline), a struggling writer from the American south, Sophie is forced to confront the dark secrets of her past. When Nazi officers give her an impossible choice between her two children, she is forever changed, and her life is irrevocably altered. It is an emotionally charged story of love, loss, hope, and redemption.

 



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