Movies About Mental Retardation

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Movies About Mental Retardation

For Movies About Mental Retardation, there are many movies who explored this idea. We wrote about 25 of the best ones.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is an inspiring tale about a slow-witted but kind-hearted man from Alabama named Forrest Gump, who despite his mental handicaps, leads an extraordinary life. Through his childlike innocence and purity of heart, Forrest is able to lead a life that touches the lives of others in extraordinary ways. From being a Vietnam war hero to a successful entrepreneur, Forrest's life is a testament to the power of will and determination. Along the way, Forrest falls in love and learns valuable lessons about life, love, and friendship. The film is an uplifting story of an unlikely hero and will certainly leave viewers feeling inspired and hopeful.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman and starring Jack Nicholson. Set in a mental institution in Oregon, the film follows Randle McMurphy, a criminal who fakes insanity in order to avoid a prison sentence and is sent to the institution. There, he clashes with the authoritarian Nurse Ratched, who runs the ward with an iron fist and a strict regimen of drugs and therapy. With the help of his fellow inmates, McMurphy attempts to thwart Ratched's regime, ultimately leading to a revolution within the ward and a battle of wills between McMurphy and Ratched. The film won Best Picture at the 1975 Oscars, and Nicholson won Best Actor for his performance as McMurphy.

The Green Mile (1999)

The Green Mile
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt
Rated R

The Green Mile is a 1999 American fantasy drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont and based on the 1996 Stephen King novel of the same name. The film stars Tom Hanks as Paul Edgecomb, a death row corrections officer in the 1930s who develops a unique and moving relationship with John Coffey, a supernatural inmate played by Michael Clarke Duncan. The film focuses on Edgecomb's struggle to cope with the knowledge that Coffey has the power to heal and wonders if Coffey is a divine figure sent to relieve some of the pain and suffering that the men of death row endure. The story is narrated by Edgecomb in the present day, as he reflects on his experience with Coffey and the events that ultimately lead to Coffey's execution. In addition to exploring themes of faith, justice, and mercy, the film also examines the inherent racism in 1930s America and how it affects Coffey's fate. The film received four Academy Award nominations, and was a box office success, grossing over $286 million.

The Intouchables (2011)

The Intouchables
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Olivier Nakache, Éric Toledano, starring François Cluzet, Omar Sy, Anne Le Ny, Audrey Fleurot
Rated R

The Intouchables is a 2011 French comedy-drama film directed by Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano. The film tells the true story of a wealthy, physically disabled millionaire who, in spite of his indignity, develops a bond with a young man from the projects who is hired to be his caretaker. Despite their social differences, the two men become close friends as the millionaire teaches his caretaker how to enjoy life, while the caretaker teaches the millionaire to see the world in a whole new light. The film was an immense financial success at the box office, becoming the second highest-grossing film of all time in France. In the United States, it was distributed by The Weinstein Company and grossed over $10 million. The film was nominated for several awards, including a César Award for Best Actor for Omar Sy and a Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

The Best of Youth (2003)

The Best of Youth
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Marco Tullio Giordana, starring Luigi Lo Cascio, Alessio Boni, Jasmine Trinca, Adriana Asti
Rated R

The Best of Youth is a 2003 Italian drama film written and directed by Marco Tullio Giordana. It follows the lives of two Italian brothers, Matteo and Nicola Carati, over the course of thirty-six years, from 1966 to 2002. The film explores their evolving relationship amidst the political and social upheavals of Italy over those years, including the student uprisings of the 1960s, the terrorist actions of the Red Brigades, and the debates over the legal status of divorce. Along the way, the brothers struggle with personal issues, such as Matteo's relationship with his father and Nicola's addiction to drugs. The film was nominated for the Palme d'Or at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival and won several awards.

Memento (2000)

Memento
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Guy Pearce, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, Mark Boone Junior
Rated R

Memento is a neo-noir psychological thriller film directed by Christopher Nolan. The movie follows Leonard Shelby, a man suffering from anterograde amnesia, as he attempts to avenge the rape and murder of his wife. He is unable to form new memories, so he relies on self-made notes and tattoos to track the man who he believes is responsible for his wife's death. As the film progresses, Leonard discovers that his memory is not as reliable as he had previously thought, as pieces of his past are revealed and the truth behind his wife's death is slowly uncovered. The film is told in reverse chronological order and is filled with many plot twists, making it an intriguing and thought-provoking story.

The Elephant Man (1980)

The Elephant Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Anthony Hopkins, John Hurt, Anne Bancroft, John Gielgud
Rated PG

"The Elephant Man" is a 1980 biographical drama film directed by David Lynch and starring John Hurt, Anthony Hopkins, Anne Bancroft and John Gielgud. The film tells the story of John Merrick (Hurt), a severely deformed Londoner who is discovered by a surgeon, Frederick Treves (Hopkins) in a Victorian-era freak show. Merrick is taken under Treves' care and studied by the medical community, but treated cruelly by the public. Treves' attempts to bring Merrick into society create a struggle between human decency and accepted norms of the time. Merrick's inner strength and intelligence are revealed to the audience, and his unique story is ultimately one of beauty and hope in the face of prejudice and cruelty.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical drama film based on the life of the Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr., a troubled genius who, after years of struggle with mental illness, eventually triumphs over the odds to become one of the most renowned figures in mathematics. The film stars Russell Crowe as Nash, alongside Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bettany, Adam Goldberg, Judd Hirsch, Josh Lucas, and Anthony Rapp. The story follows Nash's struggles with paranoid schizophrenia, as he attempts to work at Princeton University and later on secret projects for the Pentagon. Despite his mental illness, Nash manages to win the Nobel Prize in Economics, and his life eventually becomes an inspiration to all. The film features strong performances by the cast, as well as a well-crafted screenplay and score, making it a truly touching and inspiring story.

Into the Wild (2007)

Into the Wild
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sean Penn, starring Emile Hirsch, Vince Vaughn, Catherine Keener, Marcia Gay Harden
Rated R

Into the Wild is a 2007 American biographical drama film written, co-produced, and directed by Sean Penn. The film stars Emile Hirsch as Christopher McCandless, a man who hiked across North America into the Alaskan wilderness in the early 1990s. The film also features Marcia Gay Harden, William Hurt, Jena Malone, Catherine Keener, Brian H. Dierker, Vince Vaughn, Kristen Stewart, and Hal Holbrook. The film follows McCandless' story as he abandons his possessions, gives his entire savings away, and sets out on a journey across North America. Throughout his journey, he encounters a variety of people who each shape his life in different ways. The film documents his adventures, his struggles, and his eventual death in the Alaskan wilderness. The film highlights McCandless' ideals and explores themes of freedom, adventure, and self-discovery. It is a powerful story of an individual's search for meaning and an exploration of the human spirit.

The Miracle Worker (1962)

The Miracle Worker
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Arthur Penn, starring Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson
Rated Approved

The Miracle Worker is a 1962 biographical drama film directed by Arthur Penn. It tells the true story of Annie Sullivan (Anne Bancroft) and her student Helen Keller (Patty Duke). Born blind, deaf and mute, Helen is a wild and unruly child until Annie defies the conventional methods of her time and succeeds in teaching Helen to communicate. With patience, understanding and firmness, Annie breaks through Helen's walls of silence and darkness and teaches her to express and understand language, developing a bond that will last a lifetime. Despite their struggles, the two triumph in the end over seemingly insurmountable odds and ultimately Helen is able to lead a normal life.

Rain Man (1988)

Rain Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Barry Levinson, starring Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise, Valeria Golino, Gerald R. Molen
Rated R

Rain Man is a 1988 American road comedy-drama film directed by Barry Levinson and written by Barry Morrow and Ronald Bass. It tells the story of an abrasive, selfish young wheeler-dealer, Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise), who discovers that his estranged father has died and bequeathed all of his multimillion-dollar estate to his other son, Raymond (Dustin Hoffman), an autistic savant, of whose existence Charlie was unaware. Charlie is left with only his father's car and collection of rosebushes. Charlie is determined to gain control of his father's estate. He realizes that, in order to get his fair share, he must take control of his brother, Raymond, who is both a savant and a genius, unaware of many of the customs and conventions of contemporary society. He and Raymond travel cross-country, learning about each other, and gradually forming a bond. In the end, Charlie learns to accept and appreciate his brother, as well as himself.

The Sea Inside (2004)

The Sea Inside
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Alejandro Amenábar, starring Javier Bardem, Belén Rueda, Lola Dueñas, Mabel Rivera
Rated PG-13

The Sea Inside is a 2004 Spanish-language biographical drama film about Ramón Sampedro, a Spanish quadriplegic who fought for 28 years for the right to end his life with dignity. Ramón suffered a diving accident at age twenty-six, which left him paralyzed from the neck down, and he was unable to move any part of his body below his neck. Despite this, he remained an optimistic spirit, determined to live life to the fullest and helping others in need. The film follows Ramón's quest to win the right to end his own life, with the help of a lawyer and a journalist who become deeply invested in his case. Along the way, he falls in love with a young woman who helps him to see life in a new and beautiful light. Ultimately, his story culminates in a powerful and emotional climax, as Ramón's courage and determination are tested in his struggle to make his own decisions about life and death.

Sling Blade (1996)

Sling Blade
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Billy Bob Thornton, starring Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight Yoakam, J.T. Walsh, John Ritter
Rated R

Sling Blade is a 1996 film directed by and starring Billy Bob Thornton. The film follows the story of Karl Childers, a mentally disabled man who is released from an Arkansas mental hospital after spending 25 years there for killing his mother and her lover. Upon his release, Karl finds a job at a local repair shop and befriends a young boy and his single mother, forming a close bond with both of them. When Karl discovers the mother's abusive boyfriend, Karl is forced to confront his past and ultimately make a difficult decision. The film is a touching and emotionally-charged drama that explores themes of redemption and acceptance.

Being There (1979)

Being There
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Hal Ashby, starring Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden
Rated PG

Being There is a 1979 American comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby. It stars Peter Sellers as a simple-minded gardener who, after inadvertently becoming a celebrity, is courted by the wealthy and powerful. The film also stars Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, and Richard Dysart. The film follows Chance, an elderly gardener who lives a simple and sheltered life in Washington D.C. After the death of his employer, Chance is forced to leave his home and wander through the city. He is soon taken in by an old, wealthy business magnate and his wife, Eve. After several misunderstandings due to Chance's limited knowledge of the world, he becomes a celebrity and is courted by the political and social elite. He eventually gains enough influence to sway the opinions of political advisors, business leaders, and even the US President. In the end, Chance is left to ponder his newfound fame and the potential for a better life.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Julian Schnabel, starring Mathieu Amalric, Emmanuelle Seigner, Marie-Josée Croze, Anne Consigny
Rated PG-13

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is a 2007 biopic film directed by Julian Schnabel and based on the autobiography of the same name by Jean-Dominique Bauby. The film tells the story of Bauby, a former French Elle magazine editor who suffers a stroke that leaves him completely paralyzed, except for his left eye. With help from his speech therapist, he is able to communicate by blinking his eye to spell out words on a special alphabet board. As he slowly adjusts to his new life, he embarks on an inner journey of self-discovery and redemption. The film is a beautiful exploration of the strength of human will and how it can transcend even the harshest of circumstances.

Scent of a Woman (1992)

Scent of a Woman
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Martin Brest, starring Al Pacino, Chris O'Donnell, James Rebhorn, Gabrielle Anwar
Rated R

Scent of a Woman is a 1992 drama directed by Martin Brest and starring Al Pacino as Frank Slade, a retired U.S. Army Colonel who is blind and despondent. In order to help pay for his nephew's college tuition, Slade agrees to let a prep school student, Charlie Simms (Chris O'Donnell), be his guide and companion for a few days. During the course of their excursion, the two form a strong bond, with Slade teaching Charlie to appreciate life and take risks. When Slade discovers that Charlie is being wrongfully expelled from the school, he takes it upon himself to take drastic action and stand up against the school's corrupt administration. Filled with humor, drama, and an unforgettable performance by Pacino, Scent of a Woman is a powerful story of redemption and self-discovery.

The King's Speech (2010)

The King's Speech
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tom Hooper, starring Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter, Derek Jacobi
Rated R

The King's Speech is a historical drama about King George VI of the United Kingdom (played by Colin Firth). He struggles with a persistent speech impediment, and his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) seeks help from Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush). Through Logue's unconventional methods, George VI is able to overcome his stammer and deliver an inspiring speech to the nation as Great Britain enters World War II. The film also explores the relationship between George VI and his brother Edward VIII (Guy Pearce), whose abdication of the throne thrust the unprepared George into kingship. The King's Speech won the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay.

The Imitation Game (2014)

The Imitation Game
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Morten Tyldum, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, Allen Leech
Rated PG-13

The Imitation Game tells the incredible true story of Alan Turing, a British mathematician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist who is credited with cracking Germany’s Enigma code during World War II. Turing, played by Benedict Cumberbatch, is a genius, but his unconventional behavior and social awkwardness make him an outcast. After the war, he is convicted of homosexuality, a crime at the time, and is forced to undergo chemical castration as a punishment. Despite his struggles, Turing manages to lead a group of fellow mathematicians in cracking the German's code, ultimately helping the Allies win the war. The film also highlights Turing's efforts to build the first computer and his pioneering work in Artificial Intelligence. As the events of his life unfold, Turing is revealed to be a complex and brilliant man who was ultimately denied the recognition he deserved for his achievements.

Mommy (2014)

Mommy
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Xavier Dolan, starring Anne Dorval, Antoine Olivier Pilon, Suzanne Clément, Patrick Huard
Rated R

Mommy is a Canadian drama film directed by Xavier Dolan and starring Anne Dorval, Antoine-Olivier Pilon, and Suzanne Clément. The story follows the tumultuous relationship of a widowed single mother and her troubled teenage son who is diagnosed with ADHD. Despite their differences and challenging situation, the two form an unbreakable bond and strive to make the best of their situation. Along the way, they are supported by a kind neighbor, Kyla, and a determined teacher, Steve, who helps Steve’s son to cope with his struggles. The film explores themes of mental health, family dynamics, and resilience in the face of adversity. It also highlights the importance of support systems in helping young people with mental health issues, and the power of a mother’s unconditional love.

My Name Is Khan (2010)

My Name Is Khan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Karan Johar, starring Shah Rukh Khan, Kajol, Sheetal Menon, Katie Amanda Keane
Rated PG-13

My Name Is Khan is a 2010 Bollywood drama film directed by Karan Johar, starring Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol in the lead roles. The film follows the story of Rizwan Khan (Khan), an autistic Muslim from India who moves to San Francisco with his brother, after facing prejudice and discrimination in India due to his religion. Rizwan meets Mandira (Kajol), a Hindu single mother, and falls in love with her. When 9/11 happens, the couple is faced with more discrimination due to Rizwan’s faith, leading to a tragedy that threatens to tear the couple apart. Rizwan embarks on a journey across the United States to meet the President of the United States and prove to the world that “My Name Is Khan and I am not a terrorist.” Along the way, Rizwan faces various challenges but ultimately succeeds in his quest, proving that love and courage can overcome all obstacles.

Talk to Her (2002)

Talk to Her
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Pedro Almodóvar, starring Rosario Flores, Javier Cámara, Darío Grandinetti, Leonor Watling
Rated R

Talk to Her is a 2002 Spanish drama film written, directed and co-produced by Pedro Almodóvar. The film follows two men who, despite their contrasting personalities and different backgrounds, develop a strong bond through their shared affection for two women who are both in comas. The men become friends as they sit by the women's sides in the hospital, talking to them and sharing their stories. Through the course of the film, secrets are revealed and secrets are kept, dramatically altering the lives of the four characters. In the end, the story of Talk to Her is a powerful and moving exploration of friendship, love and loss.

Dancer in the Dark (2000)

Dancer in the Dark
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Lars von Trier, starring Björk, Catherine Deneuve, David Morse, Peter Stormare
Rated R

Dancer in the Dark is a 2000 musical tragedy film written and directed by Lars von Trier. The film stars Icelandic musician Björk as a Czech immigrant factory worker in Washington state who is slowly going blind. Struggling to make ends meet and provide a better life for her son, she begins to sneakily steal money for a life-saving operation for him. When she is eventually caught and put on trial, the music and dance sequences become a way to express her inner turmoil. Ultimately, her story is a tragic one in which she must choose between doing the right thing and sacrificing her own life, or saving her son and facing the consequences.

My Left Foot (1989)

My Left Foot
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Jim Sheridan, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Brenda Fricker, Alison Whelan, Kirsten Sheridan
Rated R

My Left Foot tells the incredible true story of Christy Brown, an Irishman born with cerebral palsy, who could only control his left foot. Despite the tremendous physical restrictions of his disability, Christy learns to paint and write using the only part of his body he can control, and eventually writes his own autobiography. Through the support of his mother and family, Christy is able to overcome the obstacles of his disability and lead a full life. The film portrays the love and determination of his family, as well as his own indomitable spirit, in this inspiring and heartwarming story.

Awakenings (1990)

Awakenings
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Penny Marshall, starring Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Julie Kavner, Ruth Nelson
Rated PG-13

Awakenings is a 1990 American drama film directed by Penny Marshall and starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. The film is based on the true story of British neurologist Oliver Sacks, and his book of the same name, which tells the story of a group of catatonic patients who were treated with a new drug called L-Dopa. In the late 1960s, Dr. Sacks discovers that these patients, who were believed to be in a permanent state of catatonia, can be brought back to life with L-Dopa. Through his dedication, Sacks helps the patients regain some of their lost abilities, allowing them to understand and process their emotions. As the patients begin to re-awaken, they become aware of the years they have lost and struggle to regain a sense of self. Ultimately, this powerful story of hope and courage shows the power of the human spirit to overcome even the most daunting of obstacles.

What's Eating Gilbert Grape (1993)

What's Eating Gilbert Grape
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Lasse Hallström, starring Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis, Mary Steenburgen
Rated PG-13

What's Eating Gilbert Grape is a 1993 drama film directed by Lasse Hallström and starring Johnny Depp, Juliette Lewis, and Leonardo DiCaprio. The story follows Gilbert Grape (Depp) as he takes care of his morbidly obese mother, Bonnie, and his mentally-challenged brother, Arnie (DiCaprio). Struggling to keep his family together and make ends meet, Gilbert is stuck in a dead-end job at a local grocery store. His life is changed when a free-spirited young woman named Becky (Lewis) and her grandmother (Mary Steenburgen) travel through town, giving Gilbert the chance to live out his dreams. The film follows Gilbert and his family as they learn to love and accept each other despite their respective struggles.

 



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