Most Controversial Movies

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Most Controversial Movies

Multiple movies have talked about Most Controversial Movies. We assembled 25 of the best ones.

American History X (1998)

American History X
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Tony Kaye, starring Edward Norton, Edward Furlong, Beverly D'Angelo, Jennifer Lien
Rated R

American History X is a 1998 drama film directed by Tony Kaye and written by David McKenna. The film stars Edward Norton as Derek Vinyard, a former neo-nazi skinhead who is sent to prison after killing two African-American gang members in a drive-by shooting. After his release, Derek works to prevent his younger brother, Danny (Edward Furlong), from following the same path. The film examines racism in the United States and the impact it can have on the lives of those affected. It also explores the difficult process of transformation and redemption. The film was controversial upon its release, particularly due to its exploration of neo-nazism and violence. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Editing and was highly praised by critics.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. It stars Malcolm McDowell as the charismatic and psychopathic delinquent Alex DeLarge, alongside Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke, and Adrienne Corri. In a futuristic England, Alex and his gang of droogs indulge in ultra-violence, rape, and theft, until Alex is arrested and imprisoned for murder. He then agrees to undergo an experimental psychotherapy treatment, designed to reprogram him, in order to be released early from prison. However, upon his release from prison, Alex finds himself in an unfamiliar society, struggling to adjust to a new way of life and unable to truly change his wicked ways. The film is known for its extensive use of classical music, its violent imagery, and its social commentary on youth, morality, and crime.

Requiem for a Dream (2000)

Requiem for a Dream
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto, Jennifer Connelly, Marlon Wayans
Rated R

Requiem for a Dream is an American psychological drama film directed by Darren Aronofsky and based on the novel of the same name by Hubert Selby Jr. The film follows four characters -- Harry Goldfarb, his mother Sara Goldfarb, his girlfriend Marion Silver, and his best friend Tyrone C. Love -- as they each descend into their own personal hell. Harry and Tyrone become addicted to heroin, Marion gets involved in the dangerous world of prostitution, and Sara becomes obsessed with appearing on a television game show. As their individual dreams become distorted, their relationships deteriorate and their lives spiral out of control. Ultimately, each of them must face their own demons in order to find redemption.

Full Metal Jacket (1987)

Full Metal Jacket
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Matthew Modine, R. Lee Ermey, Vincent D'Onofrio, Adam Baldwin
Rated R

"Full Metal Jacket" is a 1987 war film directed by Stanley Kubrick. It follows a group of U.S. Marines from their intense training in boot camp to their deployment in Vietnam. The film follows the story of Private Joker, a young recruit who is struggling to find his place among the harsh Marine lifestyle. He is joined by the rebellious Private Pyle, and the two form an unlikely bond. The film depicts the harsh reality of the Vietnam War--from the physical and mental hardships of boot camp to the brutality of the battlefield. The film also explores the psychological aspects of war and the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder on soldiers. In the end, the film presents a bleak picture of the futility of war, and the ultimate cost of survival.

Taxi Driver (1976)

Taxi Driver
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster, Cybill Shepherd, Albert Brooks
Rated R

Taxi Driver follows the story of loner and Vietnam veteran Travis Bickle. After struggling to adjust to civilian life in New York City, Travis begins to spiral into a deep depression. He takes a job as a night shift taxi driver to occupy his lonely nights. During his time as a taxi driver, Travis becomes disgusted with the city’s sleaze, violence, and corruption. After befriending child prostitute Iris, he decides to take it upon himself to clean up the city by eliminating its corruption. In the end, Travis’s mission fails, leaving him alone and broken.

The Deer Hunter (1978)

The Deer Hunter
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Michael Cimino, starring Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale, John Savage
Rated R

The Deer Hunter is a 1978 American epic war drama film directed by Michael Cimino and starring Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, Meryl Streep, and John Savage. It follows a trio of Russian American steelworkers in Vietnam, who are forced to play Russian roulette by their captors. The story spans several years, with the men's experiences in Vietnam serving as the backdrop for their lives back home in Pennsylvania. As they struggle to cope with their trauma, they must come to terms with the tragedy of war and the loss of innocence. The Deer Hunter won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

Deliverance (1972)

Deliverance
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From John Boorman, starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox
Rated R

Deliverance is a 1972 American thriller-drama directed by John Boorman and starring Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, and Ronny Cox. The film tells the story of four city men, Lewis (Voight), Ed (Reynolds), Bobby (Beatty), and Drew (Cox), who embark on a weekend canoeing trip in the Georgia backcountry. Soon they find themselves in over their heads as they are forced to confront the harsh reality of the wilderness and a violent backwoods clan that threatens their lives. Along the way, Lewis, Ed, Bobby, and Drew must find courage and ingenuity to survive the treacherous journey and reclaim their freedom.

Battle Royale (2000)

Battle Royale
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Kinji Fukasaku, starring Tatsuya Fujiwara, Aki Maeda, Tarô Yamamoto, Chiaki Kuriyama
Rated Not Rated

Battle Royale is a Japanese cult classic film directed by Kinji Fukasaku. The film follows a group of 42 students who are part of a government program that has been put in place in an attempt to control Japan's growing teenage population. As part of the program, the students are sent to a remote island where they are forced to fight to the death until only one remains alive. The students must use whatever means necessary to survive, including forming alliances and using any weapons they can find. Throughout the film, the students struggle to survive the game while dealing with their own inner turmoil. The film is an exploration of the dark side of human nature and its ability to drive people to do unthinkable acts in order to survive.

Funny Games (1997)

Funny Games
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Michael Haneke, starring Susanne Lothar, Ulrich Mühe, Arno Frisch, Frank Giering
Rated Not Rated

Funny Games is a 1997 Austrian psychological horror film written and directed by Michael Haneke. The story follows a family of three — Anna (Susanne Lothar), George (Ulrich Mühe), and their son Georgie (Stefan Clapczynski) — who are vacationing at their vacation home by a lake in Austria. One day, two polite young men, Peter (Frank Giering) and Paul (Arno Frisch), arrive at their door, asking to borrow some eggs. The family lets them in, unaware that they are in the presence of sociopaths who intend to torture and terrorize the family in various ways over the next few hours. As the film progresses, the family's attempts to escape the men's sadistic games become increasingly futile, as they are relentlessly tormented and ultimately killed one by one. The film is a horror story where the audience is forced to watch the family's suffering with no reprieve, as the men make sure to constantly remind the audience that what is happening is only a game.

The Last Temptation of Christ (1988)

The Last Temptation of Christ
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Willem Dafoe, Harvey Keitel, Barbara Hershey, Paul Greco
Rated R

The Last Temptation of Christ is a 1988 drama/fantasy film directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Paul Schrader. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Greek author Nikos Kazantzakis. The film follows the life of Jesus Christ (Willem Dafoe) from his birth to the moment of his crucifixion. As Jesus struggles with his divine mission and great responsibility, he is tempted by Satan (Robert De Niro) to renounce his mission and accept a simpler, mortal life. Jesus ultimately rejects this temptation and ultimately embraces his divine purpose. The film also explores the relationship between Jesus and his Apostles, including Judas Iscariot (Harvey Keitel). The film was met with controversy upon its release, but has since become a critically acclaimed classic.

The Piano Teacher (2001)

The Piano Teacher
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Michael Haneke, starring Isabelle Huppert, Annie Girardot, Benoît Magimel, Susanne Lothar
Rated R

The Piano Teacher is a 2001 Austrian-German psychological drama directed by Michael Haneke. It follows the story of Erika Kohut (Isabelle Huppert), a repressed piano teacher at a Viennese music conservatory who has a long-standing masochistic relationship with her mother. When she meets student Walter Klemmer (Benoît Magimel), she finds herself drawn to his boldness and begins a relationship with him. As the relationship develops, Erika's repressed desires and dark fantasies begin to surface, leading to a series of unexpected and potentially devastating consequences. The film explores themes of repression, obsession and the meaning of self-expression.

Lolita (1962)

Lolita
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring James Mason, Shelley Winters, Sue Lyon, Gary Cockrell
Rated Not Rated

Lolita is a 1962 dramatic film adaptation of the Vladimir Nabokov novel of the same name. Directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick, the film stars James Mason, Shelley Winters, and Sue Lyon in the title role. The film follows the story of a middle-aged professor, Humbert Humbert (Mason), who is infatuated with a teenage girl, Dolores Haze (Lyon), whom he nicknames Lolita. After Humbert marries her mother (Winters) in order to stay close to Lolita, he struggles to keep his obsession with her hidden, as his feelings become increasingly more possessive and controlling. The film culminates with Humbert's ultimate undoing, as his obsessive behavior leads to his own destruction. Though controversial upon its release, Lolita has since become a classic of American cinema, and is widely regarded as one of Kubrick’s greatest films.

Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Eyes Wide Shut
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Todd Field, Sydney Pollack
Rated R

Eyes Wide Shut is a psychological thriller directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. The film follows the story of a successful New York doctor and his wife who, after having a heated argument, each separately embark on a journey of sexual self-discovery. As the doctor strays further and further away from his wife, he finds himself caught in the middle of a bizarre and dangerous secret society. As his investigation deepens, he discovers the seedy underbelly of the city and is forced to confront his own dark desires and insecurities. Along the way, he must also come to terms with the consequences of his increasingly reckless behavior.

Irreversible (2002)

Irreversible
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Gaspar Noé, starring Monica Bellucci, Vincent Cassel, Albert Dupontel, Philippe Nahon
Rated Not Rated

I Stand Alone (1998)

I Stand Alone
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Gaspar Noé, starring Philippe Nahon, Blandine Lenoir, Frankie Pain, Martine Audrain
Rated Not Rated

Borat (2006)

Borat
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Larry Charles, starring Sacha Baron Cohen, Ken Davitian, Luenell, Chester
Rated R

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)

The Unbearable Lightness of Being
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Philip Kaufman, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Juliette Binoche, Lena Olin, Derek de Lint
Rated R

Natural Born Killers (1994)

Natural Born Killers
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Oliver Stone, starring Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis, Tom Sizemore, Rodney Dangerfield
Rated R

The Passion of the Christ (2004)

The Passion of the Christ
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Mel Gibson, starring Jim Caviezel, Monica Bellucci, Maia Morgenstern, Christo Jivkov
Rated R

Shame (2011)

Shame
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Steve McQueen, starring Michael Fassbender, Carey Mulligan, James Badge Dale, Lucy Walters
Rated NC-17

Don't Look Now (1973)

Don't Look Now
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Nicolas Roeg, starring Julie Christie, Donald Sutherland, Hilary Mason, Clelia Matania
Rated R

Audition (1999)

Audition
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Takashi Miike, starring Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina, Tetsu Sawaki, Jun Kunimura
Rated R

Ichi the Killer (2001)

Ichi the Killer
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Takashi Miike, starring Tadanobu Asano, Nao Ômori, Shin'ya Tsukamoto, Paulyn Sun
Rated R

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986)

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From John McNaughton, starring Michael Rooker, Tracy Arnold, Tom Towles, Mary Demas
Rated Unrated

Kids (1995)

Kids
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Larry Clark, starring Leo Fitzpatrick, Justin Pierce, Chloë Sevigny, Sarah Henderson
Rated Not Rated

 



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