Top Recommended Movies

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Top Recommended Movies

Have you heard these Top Recommended Movies? We bet you'll find some new movies. We gathered 25 of the best ones.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather is the story of the Corleone crime family, led by patriarch Vito Corleone. The family's business is primarily handled by his eldest son, Sonny. Vito's youngest son, Michael, is not interested in the family business, but chooses to join the Marines and serve in World War II. Upon his return, Michael finds out that his father's enemies have been trying to take control of the family business. Michael takes the initiative to protect his father and take control of the family. He is ruthless and cunning, eliminating the threats and expanding the family's empire. He eventually becomes the new Don of the Corleone crime family, and guides them through the treacherous waters of organized crime. In the end, Michael's actions have made the Corleone crime family the most powerful in the country.

12 Angry Men (1957)

12 Angry Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Sidney Lumet, starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Martin Balsam, John Fiedler
Rated Approved

12 Angry Men is a 1957 American courtroom drama directed by Sidney Lumet. The film follows the deliberations of a jury composed of twelve men as they deliberate the conviction or acquittal of a young man accused of murder. Initially, all but one of the jurors have decided that the defendant is guilty. As the movie progresses, the jurors gradually discover reasonable doubt in the evidence presented to them and slowly come to the realization that the defendant may be innocent. This leads to an intense debate amongst the jurors as they grapple with their own prejudices, preconceptions, and moral codes. Through this process, the jurors must eventually decide if the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, or not guilty.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef, Aldo Giuffrè
Rated R

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly is an epic western directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood. Set during the American Civil War, the film follows the adventures of three gunslingers, Blondie (Clint Eastwood), Tuco (Eli Wallach), and Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef). Blondie and Tuco team up to make money by robbing banks and graves, while Angel Eyes is hired by a mysterious employer to track down a soldier carrying $200,000 in Confederate gold. As the three men race to find the gold, their paths cross and they become embroiled in a violent struggle to possess it. Along the way, they must fight off a gang of bounty hunters, a corrupt sheriff, and the Union army. With its iconic villains, quick-draw gunfights, and panoramic vistas, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a classic spaghetti western that continues to thrill and entertain audiences.

The Green Mile (1999)

The Green Mile
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt
Rated R

The Green Mile is an American fantasy crime drama film directed by Frank Darabont and based on the 1996 Stephen King novel of the same name. It tells the story of Paul Edgecomb, a prison guard on death row in a Louisiana prison in 1935. One of the inmates, John Coffey, has been convicted of a heinous murder and is awaiting execution. Edgecomb begins to question Coffey's guilt and wonders if a miracle might occur to save him. Along the way, Edgecomb discovers that Coffey has mysterious healing abilities, and is in fact an innocent man. As the days pass, Edgecomb is forced to make a difficult decision that will change his life, and the lives of those around him, forever.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

The Silence of the Lambs
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Jonathan Demme, starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney, Kasi Lemmons
Rated R

The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 psychological horror film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, and Scott Glenn. The film follows FBI agent Clarice Starling (Foster) as she attempts to apprehend notorious serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Hopkins) in order to gain his insight into the mind of another serial killer, known as Buffalo Bill (Glenn). Along the way, she must confront both her own inner demons as well as Lecter's manipulation of her. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor (Hopkins), Best Actress (Foster), Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Director (Demme).

Casablanca (1942)

Casablanca
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains
Rated PG

Casablanca is a classic film set in the unoccupied French city of the same name in 1941 during World War II. The movie follows the story of Rick Blaine, a cynical American expatriate who runs a nightclub in the city. He is reluctantly drawn into helping a Czech Resistance leader, Victor Laszlo, and his wife, Ilsa Lund, escape from the Nazis. Rick discovers that Ilsa is the woman he once loved and the two must make a difficult decision between love and helping Laszlo escape to freedom. The movie features iconic moments, powerful performances, and a classic ending that have made it one of the most beloved films of all time.

Back to the Future (1985)

Back to the Future
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Crispin Glover
Rated PG

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science fiction comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who is sent back in time to 1955, where he meets his future parents and becomes his mother's romantic interest. Marty must also find a way to return to his own time, with the help of eccentric scientist Dr. Emmett Brown, played by Christopher Lloyd. Along the way, he inadvertently interferes with his parents' first meeting and falls in love with his high school teacher, played by Lea Thompson. The film is widely considered to be one of the greatest films ever made, and was followed by two sequels: Back to the Future Part II in 1989 and Back to the Future Part III in 1990. It was also adapted into a live stage show and a video game.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a 1960 psychological horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It follows Marion Crane, a secretary who embezzles money from her employer and flees town. She ends up at the Bates Motel, run by a strange young man named Norman Bates and his overbearing mother. Marion soon discovers the dark secrets of the motel, as well as the deadly secrets family. As the story progresses, her disappearance leads to an investigation which unravels the twisted relationship between Norman and his mother, revealing a terrifying truth. The film was revolutionary for its time, featuring groundbreaking cinematography and a chilling score. It has become a classic of the horror genre, inspiring countless remakes and homages.

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

Once Upon a Time in the West
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, Jason Robards
Rated PG-13

Once Upon a Time in the West is a 1968 epic Spaghetti Western film directed by Sergio Leone, starring Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson, Claudia Cardinale, and Jason Robards. The film follows the story of a mysterious stranger with a harmonica who joins forces with a notorious desperado to protect a beautiful widow from a ruthless assassin working for the railroad. The film is set in the American West of the late 19th century and is a revisionist take on the traditional Western genre, with many motifs of classic Western films being turned on their head. Leone's sweeping cinematography, iconic soundtrack, and iconic performances make this film an unforgettable classic.

Alien (1979)

Alien
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Ridley Scott, starring Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt, Veronica Cartwright
Rated R

Alien is a science fiction horror film directed by Ridley Scott and released in 1979. It follows the crew of the commercial space tug Nostromo as they investigate a distress signal on an alien planet and become stalked by a deadly creature. The crew manages to defeat the alien, but not before it has killed most of them. The remaining crewmember, Ellen Ripley, is the one who finally destroys the alien by ejecting it into space. Ripley survives and is eventually rescued, but is left with the knowledge that the alien species is out there, and humanity may not be prepared to face them.

Braveheart (1995)

Braveheart
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Mel Gibson, starring Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau, Patrick McGoohan, Angus Macfadyen
Rated R

Braveheart is a 1995 epic historical war drama film directed by and starring Mel Gibson. It tells the story of the 13th-century Scottish warrior William Wallace and his fight for Scotland's freedom from English rule. Wallace rallies the Scottish against the English monarchy and its troops, leading Scotland to victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. However, he is betrayed by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish nobleman, and is subsequently captured, tried, and executed by the English. The film ends with a tribute to Wallace and the Scots' victory at Bannockburn in 1314. The film received five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Singin' in the Rain
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Jean Hagen
Rated G

Singin' in the Rain is a classic 1952 musical comedy film directed by Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly. Set in Hollywood in the late 1920s, the film follows romantic lead Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) and his sidekick Cosmo Brown (Donald O’Connor) as they navigate a changing industry from the silent era to the dawn of the talkies. Don is a silent film star who teams up with an aspiring actress, Kathy Selden (Debbie Reynolds), in an attempt to revive his career in the new era of sound films. The characters battle various obstacles and personal insecurities as they find success in the new medium. The film also features the iconic title song, "Singin' in the Rain," which is performed by Gene Kelly in one of the most unforgettable musical numbers in movie history.

The Sting (1973)

The Sting
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From George Roy Hill, starring Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw, Charles Durning
Rated PG

The Sting is a 1973 American caper film set in 1936 that follows two professional grifters, Johnny Hooker (Robert Redford) and Henry Gondorff (Paul Newman), as they seek to avenge the death of a mutual friend by conning a mob boss. The film follows them as they devise and execute a complex plan to swindle their target. Along the way, they enlist the help of a variety of other characters, including a corrupt lawyer and a master of disguise. With the help of these colorful characters, they are eventually successful in their attempt, but not without some close calls. The Sting is a beloved classic of the heist genre, winning seven Academy Awards including Best Picture.

The Great Escape (1963)

The Great Escape
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From John Sturges, starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson
Rated Approved

The Great Escape is a 1963 American World War II epic film starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, and Richard Attenborough. The film is based on the true story of a large group of Allied prisoners of war who plan an elaborate escape from a German POW camp during World War II. As the Allied prisoners organize their daring mass breakout, they are aided by a German officer sympathetic to their cause. After a series of thrilling escape attempts, the prisoners eventually succeed in breaking out of the camp. However, as they attempt to cross the heavily guarded border into Switzerland, the Gestapo and SS officers pursue the escapees, leading to a gripping climax.

No Country for Old Men (2007)

No Country for Old Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, Woody Harrelson
Rated R

No Country for Old Men is a 2007 American neo-Western thriller film directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Based on Cormac McCarthy's novel of the same name, it stars Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, and Josh Brolin. The story follows a man named Llewelyn Moss (Brolin) who discovers a large sum of money while hunting in the desert. He takes the money, but his actions set off a chain of events that lead to a violent confrontation between him, a psychopathic hitman (Bardem), and a lawman (Jones) determined to bring them both to justice. The movie has been highly acclaimed by critics, who praised the Coens' direction, the strong performances, and the film's atmosphere and attention to detail. The film won multiple Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Some Like It Hot (1959)

Some Like It Hot
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Billy Wilder, starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, George Raft
Rated Passed

Some Like It Hot is a classic 1959 comedy directed by Billy Wilder. The film follows two Chicago musicians, Joe and Jerry, who find themselves on the run after witnessing a mob hit, and disguise themselves as women to join an all-female band heading to Florida. Along the way, they both fall in love with the band's singer, Sugar, who is unaware of their true identities. Complications arise when a rich man, Osgood, falls for "Josephine" and attempts to pursue her despite her hesitations. The film is a comedic exploration of gender roles and identity, and features memorable performances from Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and Marilyn Monroe.

For a Few Dollars More (1965)

For a Few Dollars More
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Gian Maria Volontè, Mara Krupp
Rated R

For a Few Dollars More is a 1965 Italian spaghetti western directed by Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Gian Maria Volontè. The film follows two bounty hunters, "Manco" (Eastwood) and Colonel Douglas Mortimer (Van Cleef), who join forces to track down the notorious bandit El Indio (Volontè). Along the way, they face off with a variety of deadly characters, including a vicious gunslinger, a sadistic jailer, and a mysterious stranger who is always one step ahead of them. With their own codes of honor, the two lawmen must put aside their differences and work together to put an end to El Indio's criminal career. A classic example of the spaghetti western genre, For a Few Dollars More is filled with exciting action sequences and a tense moral dilemma, as the two men must decide whether to kill El Indio for personal gain or to uphold justice.

Dial M for Murder (1954)

Dial M for Murder
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Robert Cummings, John Williams
Rated PG

Dial M for Murder is a 1954 Alfred Hitchcock classic suspense film starring Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, and Robert Cummings. The story follows Tony Wendice, a former tennis pro, who has an affair with an American writer, Mark Halliday. Tony discovers the affair and plots to kill his wife, Margot, for her money. He arranges a complicated plan involving an old acquaintance, Captain Lesgate, and a pair of scissors. But when things don't go according to plan, the game of cat and mouse ensues, as Margot must outwit Tony in order to save her life. With its complex plot and suspenseful tension, Dial M for Murder is a must-see for any Hitchcock fan.

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Frank Capra, starring James Stewart, Jean Arthur, Claude Rains, Edward Arnold
Rated Passed

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is an iconic 1939 film directed by Frank Capra and starring James Stewart. The film tells the story of Jefferson Smith, an idealistic, naive man who is appointed to the United States Senate after the death of a senator from his state. Smith quickly finds himself up against a powerful political machine that is determined to keep him from uncovering their corrupt practices. With help from a few allies, Smith takes a stand against the machine, ultimately leading to a climactic filibuster in the Senate. Throughout the film, Smith stands up for the people of his state and is ultimately vindicated for his efforts. The film serves as an inspiring reminder of the strength of the American spirit in the face of adversity.

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

The Wizard of Oz
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Victor Fleming, George Cukor, Mervyn LeRoy, Norman Taurog, Richard Thorpe, King Vidor, starring Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr
Rated PG

The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 American musical fantasy film directed by Victor Fleming, George Cukor, Mervyn LeRoy, Norman Taurog, Richard Thorpe, and King Vidor. The film stars Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale, Ray Bolger as the Scarecrow, Jack Haley as the Tin Man, Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion, and Frank Morgan as the Wizard of Oz. When a tornado rips through Kansas, Dorothy, her dog, Toto, and her family are caught up in the storm. Dorothy is swept away to the magical Land of Oz, where she embarks on a quest to find the Wizard of Oz so he can help her return home. Along the way, she meets the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion, who join her on the journey, each seeking a wish from the Wizard. Along the way, they must contend with the Wicked Witch of the West and her arsenal of flying monkeys. Along the way, they learn important lessons about courage, friendship, and home. Ultimately, Dorothy and her friends find out that the Wizard isn't a real wizard, but he is still able to grant each of them their wish, and return them home.

The Deer Hunter (1978)

The Deer Hunter
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Michael Cimino, starring Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Cazale, John Savage
Rated R

The Deer Hunter is a 1978 American epic war drama film directed, co-written and produced by Michael Cimino. The film stars Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, John Savage, and Meryl Streep. The Deer Hunter is set in Clairton, Pennsylvania, a small working-class town on the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh, and in Vietnam. It follows a trio of steelworkers, played by De Niro, Walken and Savage, whose lives are changed forever after they are sent to fight in the Vietnam War. The film examines the ways in which war affects the lives of people, both at home and abroad. It is a powerful and heartbreaking examination of friendship, loyalty, tragedy, and the costs of war. The Deer Hunter received five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actor (Walken).

Jaws (1975)

Jaws
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, Lorraine Gary
Rated PG

Jaws is a 1975 American thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchley's 1974 novel of the same name. The film stars Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, Lorraine Gary, and Murray Hamilton. Set in Amity Island, a fictional seaside community, the film follows police chief Martin Brody (Scheider) as he attempts to protect beachgoers from a great white shark by closing the beach, only to be overruled by the town council. After several attacks, the town hires a professional shark hunter, oceanographer Matt Hooper (Dreyfuss) and a grizzled ship captain Quint (Shaw) to hunt and kill the shark. After an intense confrontation, Brody, Hooper, and Quint manage to kill the shark. The film is considered one of the greatest films ever made, and is credited with ushering in the modern "blockbuster" era in Hollywood, with its enormous box office success. It was nominated for Best Picture at the 48th Academy Awards, and won three Oscars for Best Film Editing, Best Original Score, and Best Sound. The film spawned four sequels, a theme park ride, a video game, and numerous parodies and references in popular culture.

Groundhog Day (1993)

Groundhog Day
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott, Stephen Tobolowsky
Rated PG

Groundhog Day is a 1993 American comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and starring Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, and Chris Elliott. The film follows cynical weatherman Phil Connors (Murray) as he relives the same day, Groundhog Day, over and over. After initially enjoying the freedom of having no consequences for his actions, Phil eventually comes to understand the true meaning of life through learning how to connect with others and improve himself. Through a series of trials and tribulations, he eventually learns to appreciate life and the people in it.

Gandhi (1982)

Gandhi
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Attenborough, starring Ben Kingsley, John Gielgud, Rohini Hattangadi, Roshan Seth
Rated PG

Gandhi is a 1982 British biographical drama film based on the life of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the leader of India's non-violent, non-cooperative independence movement against the British Raj during the 20th century. The film covers Gandhi's life from a defining moment in 1893, as he is thrown off a South African train for being in a whites-only compartment, and concludes with his assassination and funeral in 1948. Directed by Richard Attenborough and written by John Briley, the film stars Ben Kingsley in the title role. The film was well-received by critics, and was a box-office success. It was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, winning eight, including Best Picture.

Fargo (1996)

Fargo
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, starring William H. Macy, Frances McDormand, Steve Buscemi, Peter Stormare
Rated R

Fargo is a dark comedy-crime film directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. Set in Minnesota in the winter of 1987, it follows the story of Jerry Lundegaard (William H. Macy), an unfaithful car salesman who hires two criminals, Gaear Grimsrud (Peter Stormare) and Carl Showalter (Steve Buscemi), to kidnap his wife in order to extort his wealthy father-in-law for a large sum of money. However, the plan goes terribly wrong and the criminals’ violent and chaotic actions begin to spiral out of control. The film follows local police chief Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) as she investigates the case and attempts to bring the criminals to justice. Along the way, she encounters a number of eccentric characters including a suspiciously helpful salesman, a mysterious hitman, and a nosy neighbor. Ultimately, Fargo is a riveting crime drama that showcases the Coen brothers’ unique brand of dark humor and quirky characters. With its stellar cast and gripping story, this film is considered one of the Coen brothers’ best works.

 



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