Top 100 Saddest Movies

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Top 100 Saddest Movies

For Top 100 Saddest Movies, there are many creators reporting on this feeling. Here are 25 of the best ones.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

The Shawshank Redemption
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton, William Sadler
Rated R

The Shawshank Redemption is a 1994 American drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont, based on the 1982 Stephen King novella, Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. It tells the story of banker Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins), who is sentenced to life in Shawshank State Penitentiary for the murder of his wife and her lover, despite his claims of innocence. During his time at the prison, he befriends a fellow inmate, Ellis "Red" Redding (Morgan Freeman), and finds himself protected by the guards after the bulk of the inmates are released. Through Red, Andy is able to smuggle in money, books and other items to make his time more bearable. Andy eventually earns the respect and admiration of his fellow inmates, and gradually gains influence within the prison. He is eventually able to get a job in the prison library, and even secures a partial pardon after helping the warden cover up a financial scandal. After 19 years inside Shawshank, Andy finally escapes and is reunited with Red in Mexico. The film is widely considered to be one of the greatest films of all time, with a 96% on Rotten Tomatoes, and its inspiring messages of hope

Schindler's List (1993)

Schindler's List
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, Caroline Goodall
Rated R

Schindler's List is a 1993 American historical period drama film directed and co-produced by Steven Spielberg, and written by Steven Zaillian. The film is based on the true story of Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories. It stars Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes as SS officer Amon Göth, and Ben Kingsley as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern. The film follows the true story of Oskar Schindler, a German businessman who becomes concerned for the well-being of his Jewish workers during the Holocaust. He bribes Nazi officers in order to keep them employed in his factory, and goes above and beyond to protect them from the horrors of the Holocaust. Despite the danger, Schindler risks his life to save those he cares about and is ultimately able to save over 1,000 Jews.

The Dark Knight (2008)

The Dark Knight
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart, Michael Caine
Rated PG-13

The Dark Knight is a 2008 superhero film directed by Christopher Nolan and based on the DC Comics character Batman. The film stars Christian Bale, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart, Michael Caine, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Gary Oldman. The film follows the vigilante Batman as he attempts to thwart a criminal mastermind known as the Joker, whose chaos threatens to overwhelm Gotham City. With the help of Lieutenant Jim Gordon and District Attorney Harvey Dent, Batman is able to confront the Joker and bring an end to his reign of terror. However, the Joker's plans have a profound effect on the city and its people. In the end, Batman must make the ultimate sacrifice to ensure the safety of Gotham City and its citizens.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 American comedy-drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Eric Roth. The film tells the story of Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks), a simple-minded man from Alabama who witnesses, and in some cases influences, some of the defining events of the latter half of the 20th century in the United States. The film follows Forrest Gump, a slow-witted but kindhearted man from Alabama, who is present during many of the defining moments of the 20th century in the United States. His simple outlook on life makes him an unwitting and unlikely hero who touches the lives of many. As he attempts to make sense of his life, Forrest Gump embarks on a journey through history and finds himself at the center of some of the most pivotal moments in recent history. Along the way, he meets a cast of characters, experiences love and loss, and ultimately finds his place in the world.

Inception (2010)

Inception
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Elliot Page, Ken Watanabe
Rated PG-13

Inception is a science-fiction action-adventure film about a team of thieves led by Dom Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) who specialize in stealing secrets from within people's subconscious minds through a process known as "inception". To achieve this, the team must implant a special type of idea known as a "seed" deep within the target's subconscious. Cobb and his team then use a mixture of dream-sharing technology and manipulation of their targets' memories to implant the seed and make it seem as though it originated from within the target's own mind. In the course of their mission, they must battle enemies from within their own subconscious as well as those from the outside world in order to complete their mission and return to reality.

It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

It's a Wonderful Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Capra, starring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Thomas Mitchell
Rated PG

It's a Wonderful Life tells the story of George Bailey, a man who has given up his dreams in order to help others and to keep his family's Savings and Loan business afloat. When an old friend, the angel Clarence, intervenes to show him what life would have been like without him, George is finally able to see how many people he has positively impacted. After a series of misfortunes, George is on the brink of suicide, only to be saved by his friends and family who have been inspired by his selfless actions. It's a Wonderful Life is a classic story of hope, love, and the power of family and community.

The Green Mile (1999)

The Green Mile
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt
Rated R

The Green Mile is a 1999 American fantasy crime drama film written and directed by Frank Darabont, based on Stephen King’s 1996 novel of the same name. The film stars Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan, Bonnie Hunt, and James Cromwell. The story follows the lives of guards on Death Row in a Louisiana prison, and the supernatural events that occur. The film focuses on the remarkable friendship that develops between a guard, Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) and one inmate, John Coffey (Duncan), whose miraculous healing and spiritual powers have a profound effect on all of the inmates on Death Row. Coffey's healing powers and mysterious nature bring faith and hope to the prisoners, and even some of the prison guards come to believe he is sent from God. As Paul discovers the truth about Coffey, the film moves towards its shocking and ultimately tragic conclusion.

Life Is Beautiful (1997)

Life Is Beautiful
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Roberto Benigni, starring Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta Braschi, Giorgio Cantarini, Giustino Durano
Rated PG-13

Life Is Beautiful is a 1997 Italian comedy-drama film directed by and starring Roberto Benigni. The film tells the story of an Italian Jewish father and his son during the Holocaust. Guido (Benigni) is an upbeat, resourceful Italian Jew who is separated from his wife and son when the Nazis invade their town and send them to a concentration camp. In order to shield his son from the horrors of the camp, Guido begins to tell him a whimsical, magical story – that the camp is a game and that the winner will receive a tank. With humor and courage, Guido does everything he can to keep his son's spirits up, even in the face of the increasing brutality and hopelessness around them. In the end, Guido sacrifices himself to save his son, but the message of hope and joy remains.

City Lights (1931)

City Lights
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Charles Chaplin, starring Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Florence Lee, Harry Myers
Rated G

City Lights is a classic 1931 silent film starring, written, and directed by Charlie Chaplin. The story follows the Tramp, a poor but kind-hearted man, who falls in love with a blind flower girl. The Tramp makes it his mission to raise the money to restore the girl’s sight. Along the way, he meets an alcoholic millionaire and a series of comedic misadventures ensue. In the end, the Tramp succeeds in his mission and restores the girl's sight. The film ends with the Tramp and the flower girl embracing, now aware of their love for each other. City Lights is a timeless love story that captures the silent film era and the resilience of the human spirit.

Léon: The Professional (1994)

Léon: The Professional
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Luc Besson, starring Jean Reno, Gary Oldman, Natalie Portman, Danny Aiello
Rated R

Léon: The Professional is a 1994 French crime-thriller starring Jean Reno, Gary Oldman, and Natalie Portman. The film follows the story of Leon (Reno), an isolated Italian hitman living in New York City. After his neighbor, Mathilda (Portman), loses her family to corrupt DEA agent Norman Stansfield (Oldman), Leon reluctantly agrees to teach her his skills so she can take revenge. Along the way, the two form a unique bond, and Leon begins to see Mathilda as a daughter. As Stansfield closes in, the two must use all their skill and cunning to survive and exact revenge.

The Pianist (2002)

The Pianist
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann, Frank Finlay, Emilia Fox
Rated R

The Pianist is a 2002 biographical drama film directed by Roman Polanski, based on the autobiography of the same name by Jewish-Polish musician Władysław Szpilman. It tells the story of Szpilman's experiences during the Nazi occupation of Poland, including his struggle to survive the Holocaust. Szpilman, a classical pianist, is forced into the Warsaw Ghetto and eventually separated from his family. He survives by relying on his musical talent and a stroke of luck, ultimately finding refuge in a ruined house. Throughout his ordeal, he maintains his hope, courage, and will to live. The film won three Academy Awards, including Best Director for Polanski, and was nominated for three more.

Gladiator (2000)

Gladiator
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Ridley Scott, starring Russell Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix, Connie Nielsen, Oliver Reed
Rated R

Gladiator is the story of Maximus Decimus Meridius, a brave and honorable Roman general who is betrayed by the Emperor's ambitious son, Commodus. Maximus is sold into slavery and trained as a gladiator, forced to fight in the Colosseum as a form of entertainment for the Roman people. With the help of his allies, including the gladiator trainer Proximo, Maximus finds the will and strength to fight for his freedom, avenge his family, and restore honor to Rome.

WALL·E (2008)

WALL·E
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Andrew Stanton, starring Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin, Fred Willard
Rated G

WALL·E is a 2008 computer-animated science fiction romance film directed by Andrew Stanton. Set in the distant future, it follows a robot named WALL·E, who is designed to clean up a waste-covered Earth. After hundreds of years of doing what he was made for, WALL·E discovers a new purpose in life when he meets a search robot named EVE. Together they embark on an adventure that spans the galaxy. Along the way, WALL·E learns the true meaning of love, friendship, and what it means to be human. The film is a heartwarming tale of love, friendship, and the power of self-discovery.

Up (2009)

Up
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Pete Docter, Bob Peterson, starring Edward Asner, Jordan Nagai, John Ratzenberger, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG

Up is a 2009 animated adventure film directed by Pete Docter and Bob Peterson. It follows the story of an elderly widower named Carl Fredricksen, who sets out on an extraordinary journey to Paradise Falls with the assistance of a young stowaway named Russell. Along their journey, they encounter talking dogs, an evil villain, and new friends, as they explore the wonders of South America. Along the way, Carl discovers the importance of friendship and understanding, and learns to let go of the past and accept life’s surprises. In the end, Carl and Russell must work together to protect Paradise Falls from the villain’s evil plans. With the help of their new friends, Carl and Russell discover the true meaning of adventure and courage.

The Elephant Man (1980)

The Elephant Man
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Anthony Hopkins, John Hurt, Anne Bancroft, John Gielgud
Rated PG

The Elephant Man is a 1980 biographical drama film directed by David Lynch, based on the life of Joseph Merrick (John Hurt), a severely deformed man in 19th century London. The film follows Merrick as he is rescued from a freak show and taken in by a London doctor, Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkins). Merrick eventually becomes a respected and beloved member of London society, despite his physical deformities. The film also follows Treves and Carr Gomm (John Gielgud), the hospital's governor, as they struggle to accept, protect, and understand Merrick. It is full of humanity, empathy, and compassion as it shows how the human spirit can triumph over physical obstacles.

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

Pan's Labyrinth
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Guillermo del Toro, starring Ivana Baquero, Ariadna Gil, Sergi López, Maribel Verdú
Rated R

Pan's Labyrinth is a 2006 fantasy drama film directed by Guillermo del Toro. Set in Spain in the 1940s, the film follows a young girl named Ofelia as she attempts to escape the horrors of the Civil War through an ancient fabled labyrinth. Along the way, she meets a mysterious faun who tasks her with completing three dangerous tasks in order to prove her identity as the reincarnation of a legendary princess. Ofelia's quest leads her down a path of both physical and psychological danger as she must confront the cruel Captain Vidal, the cruel military leader of the region and stepfather to Ofelia. The film's themes include the struggle between good and evil, the power of imagination, and the effects of war on people's lives.

The Sixth Sense (1999)

The Sixth Sense
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From M. Night Shyamalan, starring Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment, Toni Collette, Olivia Williams
Rated PG-13

The Sixth Sense tells the story of 8-year-old Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment) who is haunted by a dark secret: he is able to see and talk to the dead. With the help of child psychologist Dr. Malcolm Crowe (Bruce Willis), Cole begins to understand his supernatural ability and the ghosts that seek his help. As Crowe helps Cole confront his ghosts and come to terms with his power, they uncover a horrifying truth that has been hidden for years. With an unpredictable twist ending that will forever change the way you think of the living and the dead, The Sixth Sense is a thrilling and suspenseful journey into the mysterious unknown.

The Truman Show (1998)

The Truman Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich
Rated PG

The Truman Show is a 1998 American sci-fi comedy-drama film directed by Peter Weir, written by Andrew Niccol, and starring Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank. The film tells the story of a man who discovers that his entire life is actually a reality TV show broadcast around the world. As he struggles to discover the truth and make his escape from the show, he realizes that he may be the only person who knows the truth of his life. The film also stars Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich, and Natascha McElhone. The film received critical acclaim upon its release. It was nominated for three Academy Awards and won the BAFTA Award for Best Film.

Gran Torino (2008)

Gran Torino
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Clint Eastwood, starring Clint Eastwood, Bee Vang, Christopher Carley, Ahney Her
Rated R

Gran Torino is a 2008 American drama directed by and starring Clint Eastwood. Set in a Polish-American neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan, the film follows Walt Kowalski (Eastwood), a cantankerous Korean War veteran, who clashes with the multiracial gangs of his neighborhood. After his wife's death, Walt finds solace in a friendship with two of his Hmong neighbors, Tao and Sue, who struggle to find their place in the gang-ridden neighborhood. As Walt starts to learn about the Hmong culture and their struggles in America, he reluctantly takes it upon himself to protect the family from the neighborhood gangs. With his M1 Garand rifle, Walt takes a stand against the gangs and begins to assert his own brand of justice on the streets. In the process, he slowly starts to gain the respect of his neighbors and learns to appreciate the role of family and community in his life. In the end, he is able to find redemption and peace.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles
Rated PG

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 American drama film directed by Peter Weir and written by Tom Schulman. Starring Robin Williams, Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard, and Josh Charles, the film follows a group of students at the fictional Welton Academy, an elite preparatory school, who are inspired by the unconventional teaching methods of a new English teacher, John Keating (Williams), to pursue their dreams and seize the day. After Keating encourages the students to challenge convention and go beyond the status quo, they form an underground club where they read and share poetry, and ultimately, stand up against their oppressive educational system. The film also explores themes of individuality, freedom, and self-expression, as well as the consequences of challenging authority.

Departures (2008)

Departures
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Yôjirô Takita, starring Masahiro Motoki, Ryôko Hirosue, Tsutomu Yamazaki, Kazuko Yoshiyuki
Rated PG-13

Departures is a Japanese drama directed by Yôjirô Takita. It tells the story of Daigo, a young cellist whose life is upended when he loses his job in Tokyo and moves back to his small home town with his wife, Mika. His fortunes take a turn for the better when he finds a job as an assistant in a funeral services company. Initially repulsed by the job, he eventually comes to accept it as a way to help people come to terms with death. Daigo also finds solace in his newfound role and is eventually accepted by the town's people. The film touches on themes of death, loss, and acceptance, as Daigo finds himself drawn to the beauty in the funerary rituals.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is a cult classic film set in 1988, and follows the story of Donnie Darko, a troubled, yet gifted teen living in a small town in Virginia. Donnie is suffering from severe mental issues which cause him to sleepwalk and hallucinate a giant rabbit named Frank, who reveals to Donnie the impending doom of the world. Donnie then begins to experience time slips, which send him to different time periods, where he discovers a mysterious figure, a jet engine, and a book called The Philosophy of Time Travel. As he investigates further, Donnie discovers dark secrets about his family, his town, and the universe. In the end, Donnie must come to terms with his own mortality and make a choice that will change the course of the world.

Big Fish (2003)

Big Fish
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tim Burton, starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange
Rated PG-13

Big Fish is a 2003 American fantasy adventure comedy-drama film directed by Tim Burton and written by John August, based on Daniel Wallace's 1998 novel of the same name. The film stars Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, Alison Lohman, and Marion Cotillard. Big Fish tells the story of Edward Bloom, a former traveling salesman with a gift for storytelling, and his son, William, who is trying to reconcile his fantasies with reality. As Edward's final days approach, William reflects on his father's tall tales and his own strained relationship with him. The film intertwines several storylines, with William attempting to understand his father's life and come to terms with his death. Edward's exaggerated tales reveal his larger-than-life character and his connections to the people and places of his past, while William's search for the truth reveals stories of the people, the places, and the events of his father's life. Big Fish paints a touching portrait of a father and son, and the stories we tell to bridge the gap between them. The film was a box office success, grossing $122.9 million in the United States and Canada, and a further $66.6

Blood Diamond (2006)

Blood Diamond
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Edward Zwick, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Djimon Hounsou, Jennifer Connelly, Kagiso Kuypers
Rated R

Blood Diamond is a 2006 American-German political war thriller film directed by Edward Zwick and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Connelly, and Djimon Hounsou. Set during the Sierra Leone Civil War in 1999, it follows a South African mercenary, Danny Archer (DiCaprio), and a Mende fisherman, Solomon Vandy (Hounsou) from Sierra Leone, as they join together to recover a rare pink diamond which has the power to transform their lives. Meanwhile, a journalist, Maddy Bowen (Connelly), investigates the illegal diamond trade and its connection to the war. The film explores the illegal trade of diamonds and its links to arms and conflict in Sierra Leone, as well as exploring themes of loyalty, justice, and redemption. In the end, Vandy and Archer find the gem and part ways, with Archer giving Vandy the diamond and the money it could provide for his family's future. In the end, Vandy and his family embrace a new life, and the film ends with a message about how the diamond trade continues to fuel wars in Africa.

Black Swan (2010)

Black Swan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel, Winona Ryder
Rated R

Black Swan is a psychological thriller set in the world of professional ballet. Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman) is a young ballet dancer whose ambition is to be the lead in Swan Lake. When Nina lands the coveted lead role, she finds herself pushed to the brink mentally and physically. She experiences competition from a rival dancer, Lily (Mila Kunis), and struggles to balance her perfectionist nature with the need to let go of her inhibitions and fully embody the character of the black swan. Throughout the film, Nina battles her inner demons as she seeks to perfect her technique, and ultimately prove to everyone — including herself — that she is capable of the demanding role.

 



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