Movies Based In The 50s

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Movies Based In The 50s

Ever viewed these Movies Based In The 50s? We think you'll find some new movies. Here are 25 of our favorites.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

The Shawshank Redemption
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Frank Darabont, starring Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton, William Sadler
Rated R

The Shawshank Redemption is a 1994 American drama film directed by Frank Darabont, based on the novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King. It stars Tim Robbins as Andy Dufresne, a banker who is wrongly convicted of murder and sentenced to life in Shawshank State Penitentiary. Despite the harsh realities of prison life, Andy befriends a number of fellow inmates, including the elderly Red (Morgan Freeman), and finds a way to cope with his seemingly hopeless situation. As the years pass, Andy proves to be resilient and resourceful, eventually managing to make a daring escape from Shawshank. The film follows his journey to freedom, as well as exploring themes of hope, friendship, and justice. The Shawshank Redemption received critical acclaim and went on to become one of the most beloved films of all time.

The Godfather (1972)

The Godfather
★★★★
★★★★
3.7 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather tells the story of the powerful Corleone family in New York City in the late 1940s. Don Vito Corleone is the head of the family and his eldest son, Sonny, is his successor. After Don Vito is almost killed in an assassination attempt, his youngest son Michael steps up to take the reins of the family business. As Michael is increasingly drawn into the violent and criminal underworld of the Mafia, he finds himself becoming just as ruthless and powerful as his father. The film follows the Corleone family and their struggles to maintain their power and keep their enemies at bay as they navigate through the treacherous waters of organized crime. Along the way, they face betrayal, violence and death.

The Godfather Part II (1974)

The Godfather Part II
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton
Rated R

The Godfather Part II is the sequel to the classic 1972 film The Godfather and is highly regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola, it continues the crime saga of the Corleone family. The film follows Michael Corleone (Al Pacino), the youngest son of Don Vito Corleone, as he attempts to expand the family's criminal empire while also trying to protect his own family. He also faces his own internal conflict as he must come to terms with his past and his own morality. The movie also cuts back and forth between the past and the present to tell the backstory of his father, Don Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro). We see flashbacks of Don Vito's early life in Sicily, his rise to power in New York City, and the creation of the Corleone crime family. The Godfather Part II is considered a classic in the crime and mafia genres and is widely praised for its performances, direction, and storytelling. The film was named the 11th greatest movie of all time by the American Film Institute in 2007.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Robert Zemeckis, based on the 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. The film stars Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Mykelti Williamson, and Sally Field. Set in the mid-1960s to mid-1980s, the film follows Forrest Gump, a slow-witted but kind-hearted man from Alabama, who witnesses and unwittingly influences several defining historical events in 20th century America. Forrest, a kind but naive man with an IQ of 75, is unable to fit in with his environment. One day, while he is alone at a bus stop, Forrest meets Jenny, an old friend with whom he shares a complicated and turbulent history. Throughout the film, Forrest interacts with numerous historical figures, from presidents to celebrities, and his unique point of view helps him to make a positive impact on everyone he meets. He also finds himself in a number of strange scenarios, including a stint in Vietnam and a successful career as a professional ping pong player. Ultimately, Forrest Gump is a powerful story about friendship, courage, and hope. The film won numerous awards and accolades

Goodfellas (1990)

Goodfellas
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci, Lorraine Bracco
Rated R

Goodfellas is a classic crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese. It follows the rise and fall of Henry Hill, a gangster in 1950s-1970s America. The film chronicles Henry's years as a young mobster through his adulthood, where he and his friends partake in a life of organized crime. Henry and his cohorts experience the highs and lows of the criminal underworld, including the rewards of money, power, and respect, as well as the consequences of their actions. Through it all, Henry strives to maintain his loyalty to his friends and family, ultimately leading to his downfall. Goodfellas is a powerful film that shows the human toll of organized crime.

Back to the Future (1985)

Back to the Future
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Crispin Glover
Rated PG

Back to the Future is a 1985 American science fiction comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis, who co-wrote the screenplay with Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who is sent back in time to 1955, where he meets his future parents in high school and accidentally becomes his mother's romantic interest. Christopher Lloyd portrays the eccentric scientist Dr. Emmett "Doc" Brown, inventor of the time-traveling DeLorean, who helps Marty repair history and return to 1985. The film's themes include friendship, love, and time travel. Though time travel is a common theme in science fiction films, Back to the Future was the first to feature time travel via a time machine created by an eccentric scientist. The film features comedic elements, as well as dramatic plot twists and suspense. The film was very successful in its theatrical release, grossing over $381 million worldwide. It is widely considered one of the greatest films of all time.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho, directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1960, tells the story of Marion Crane, a secretary who steals $40,000 from her employer and goes on the run. She ends up at the isolated Bates Motel, run by a strange young man called Norman Bates. Marion soon realizes that Norman is not all he seems, and the motel holds a dreadful secret. When Marion's disappearance is discovered, her sister, her lover and a private investigator set out to find her. As the suspense builds and unexpected twists and turns reveal themselves, Marion must confront the terrifying truth about Norman and the motel.

L.A. Confidential (1997)

L.A. Confidential
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Curtis Hanson, starring Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger
Rated R

L.A. Confidential is a neo-noir crime drama film directed by Curtis Hanson and starring Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger, and Danny DeVito. Set in Los Angeles in 1953, the film follows three LAPD detectives as they investigate a series of homicides connected to a powerful and corrupt police officer. The detectives soon become entangled in a web of political corruption and violence as they race to uncover the truth. Throughout their investigation, they must also confront their own personal demons, including a mysterious connection between two of the officers. With its complex plot and gripping storyline, L.A. Confidential has come to be regarded as one of the best crime films of all time.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

"A Beautiful Mind" is a 2001 biographical drama film directed by Ron Howard. The film is based on the life of Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Nash, portrayed by Russell Crowe, and his struggles with schizophrenia. Nash is a genius mathematician who is admitted to Princeton University, where he develops a revolutionary theory. After a brief period of academic success, Nash begins to suffer from paranoid schizophrenia and is hospitalized. With the help of his wife Alicia, played by Jennifer Connelly, he is eventually able to recover and continue his work. Through his incredible determination and Alicia's love and support, Nash eventually overcomes his illness and is awarded the Nobel Prize. The film is a powerful and inspiring story of triumph over adversity.

Shutter Island (2010)

Shutter Island
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley
Rated R

Shutter Island is a psychological thriller directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio. The film follows US Marshall Teddy Daniels (DiCaprio) as he visits the Ashecliffe Hospital for the Criminally Insane on Shutter Island in order to investigate the disappearance of a patient. As he delves deeper into the mystery, Teddy finds himself trapped in a twisted game orchestrated by his own superiors. With the help of his partner (Mark Ruffalo), Teddy must confront his own demons and solve the puzzle before he loses his sanity.

Raging Bull (1980)

Raging Bull
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, Frank Vincent
Rated R

Raging Bull is a 1980 American biographical sports drama film directed by Martin Scorsese. The film stars Robert De Niro as Jake LaMotta, an Italian-American middleweight boxer whose career in the ring is overshadowed by his turbulent personal life. The film follows LaMotta's rise and fall, as he struggles to find success and happiness in his life outside of boxing. The film also features Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, and Frank Vincent. The film chronicles LaMotta's violent and self-destructive behavior outside the ring, as his mental and emotional struggles cause his relationships with his family and friends to deteriorate. LaMotta's journey is seen as a struggle between rising fame and personal demons, as he uses boxing to escape his troubled life. Through his performance, De Niro earned the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as LaMotta. The film was also nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Raging Bull has since been acclaimed as one of the greatest films of all time, and is widely considered to be one of the greatest boxing movies ever made. It has been widely praised for Scorsese's masterful direction, De Niro's riveting performance, and the

Stand by Me (1986)

Stand by Me
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Rob Reiner, starring Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Jerry O'Connell
Rated R

Stand By Me is a coming-of-age drama film directed by Rob Reiner and based on the novella The Body by Stephen King. It follows four pre-teen boys, Gordie (Wil Wheaton), Chris (River Phoenix), Teddy (Corey Feldman), and Vern (Jerry O'Connell), as they set out on a journey to find the body of a missing boy, Ray Brower, during the summer of 1959. Along the way, the boys confront their own fears, experiences, and struggles as they build a friendship that will last them a lifetime. As they come of age, they realize the journey is less about finding the body and more about finding themselves.

The Iron Giant (1999)

The Iron Giant
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Brad Bird, starring Eli Marienthal, Harry Connick Jr., Jennifer Aniston, Vin Diesel
Rated PG

The Iron Giant is a 1999 animated science fiction film directed by Brad Bird and based on the 1968 novel The Iron Man by Ted Hughes. The film follows a young boy named Hogarth Hughes who discovers a giant robotic creature whom he befriends and names "the Iron Giant". The Iron Giant eventually becomes embroiled in a battle with a government agent who is determined to destroy the robot. With help from a beatnik artist, a sympathetic military officer, and the power of friendship, Hogarth and the Iron Giant must defend themselves against the agent's onslaught. Ultimately, the Iron Giant learns the importance of sacrifice and friendship.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles
Rated PG

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 American drama film directed by Peter Weir and starring Robin Williams. Set in 1959 at the fictional elite conservative boarding school Welton Academy, it tells the story of an English teacher who inspires his students through his teaching of poetry. The story follows the students of Welton Academy as they struggle to reconcile their desire for individuality and purpose with the pressure to conform to the expectations of their parents and the school. Through his teaching, the English teacher encourages his students to “suck the marrow out of life” and to “make their lives extraordinary” by seizing the day. In the process, the boys learn the importance of friendship, self-expression and living life to the fullest.

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)

My Neighbor Totoro
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Hayao Miyazaki, starring Hitoshi Takagi, Noriko Hidaka, Chika Sakamoto, Shigesato Itoi
Rated G

My Neighbor Totoro is a beloved animated film by director Hayao Miyazaki. It tells the story of two young girls, Satsuki and Mei, who move to a new home in the countryside with their father. While exploring their new surroundings, they discover a magical forest inhabited by friendly spirits, the most prominent of which is Totoro, a giant, fluffy creature. Through this unlikely friendship, the girls learn to appreciate nature and their new home, while also discovering ways to cope with their mother's illness. Along the way, they also encounter a variety of other mysterious creatures and people in the forest, embarking on a magical adventure that is both wondrous and heartwarming.

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

The Battle of Algiers
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Gillo Pontecorvo, starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Samia Kerbash
Rated Not Rated

The Battle of Algiers is a gripping, intense drama that chronicles the struggle between the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN) and the French government during the Algerian War of Independence (1954–62). Set in the slums of Algiers, the film follows a group of FLN freedom fighters as they launch a series of bombings and other attacks against the French authorities in an attempt to gain independence. The French military response is brutal and oppressive, but the FLN's tactics remain effective. The film poignantly portrays the human cost of war and political struggle, as both sides become increasingly desperate in their attempts to achieve victory. In the end, the FLN plan succeeds and the Algerian people gain their independence.

Big Fish (2003)

Big Fish
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tim Burton, starring Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange
Rated PG-13

Big Fish is a 2003 fantasy drama directed by Tim Burton. It stars Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, and Helena Bonham Carter. The movie follows Edward Bloom (Finney) who is a dying man recalling his life in flashbacks. Edward is a larger-than-life character who has a penchant for telling tall tales. His son, Will (McGregor), has grown up in his shadow, feeling as if his father has always been elusive and distant. When Will learns that his father is ill, he decides to take a journey of understanding and reconciliation. Along the way, he meets a number of strange characters, including a witch, a giant, and a wise old man. Through these meetings, Will finally begins to understand his father and the bigger-than-life stories he's been telling for so many years. In the end, it's a story of father and son and the importance of family.

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War (2004)

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Je-kyu Kang, starring Jang Dong-Gun, Won Bin, Eun-ju Lee, Hyeong-jin Kong
Rated R

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War is a South Korean war drama directed by Je-kyu Kang and starring Won Bin and Jang Dong-gun. The film tells the story of two brothers, Jin-tae and Jin-seok Lee, who are forced to fight in the Korean War despite their age. As the conflict unfolds, the two brothers find themselves on opposite sides of the battlefield, with Jin-tae vowing to protect his family, while Jin-seok struggles to keep his conscience. As the war draws to a close, the brothers are forced to confront their deep sense of loyalty to each other, and the harsh realities of war. The film explores themes of family bonds, patriotism, and the horrors of combat.

Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982)

Pink Floyd: The Wall
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Alan Parker, starring Bob Geldof, Christine Hargreaves, James Laurenson, Eleanor David
Rated R

Pink Floyd: The Wall is a 1982 British live-action/animated musical drama film directed by Alan Parker, based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album of the same name. The film centers on a rock star named Pink and his struggles with isolation and abandonment. Through a series of flashbacks, Pink remembers his father's death in World War II and the harsh life he endured growing up with an overprotective mother. His mental and emotional turmoil eventually leads to the building of a metaphoric wall around himself, shutting out the world and leading him to a downward spiral of depression, substance abuse, and destructive behavior. With the help of a teacher, Pink begins to tear down the wall and reclaim his inner freedom. The film is a powerful and surreal exploration of the effects of emotional pain and isolation.

The Last Picture Show (1971)

The Last Picture Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Bogdanovich, starring Timothy Bottoms, Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd, Ben Johnson
Rated R

The Last Picture Show is a 1971 American drama film directed and co-written by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from the 1966 novel of the same name by Larry McMurtry. The film tells the story of a group of 1950s Texan high schoolers coming of age as they struggle with the onset of adulthood. Set in a small Texas town, the film follows the lives of two young men, Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges), as they struggle with the end of their childhoods. The backdrop of their story is the closing of the town's movie theater, which serves as both a symbol of the end of their innocence and a reflection of the larger changes taking place in the world around them. The Last Picture Show features an ensemble cast that includes Cybill Shepherd, Ben Johnson, Cloris Leachman, Ellen Burstyn, and Randy Quaid. It was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won two Oscars, for Best Supporting Actress (Leachman) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Bogdanovich & McMurtry). The Last Picture Show is regarded as one of the best films of the 1970s, and has come to be seen as a seminal work of the American New Wave

La dolce vita (1960)

La dolce vita
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Federico Fellini, starring Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimée, Yvonne Furneaux
Rated Not Rated

La Dolce Vita (The Sweet Life) is a 1960 Italian drama film directed by Federico Fellini and starring Marcello Mastroianni. The film follows Marcello Rubini, a tabloid journalist, and his increasingly desperate search for love and happiness in the high life of Rome during the "Dolce Vita" era of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Marcello’s quest leads him through a series of nighttime encounters with beautiful women and wealthy socialites, all the while struggling to reconcile his own moral and spiritual values with a decadent lifestyle. Along the way, he finds himself drawn into a world of parties, celebrity gossip and their accompanying scandalous rumors. With its strong visual imagery and memorable soundtrack, La Dolce Vita remains one of Fellini's most beloved works, and is often acclaimed as one of the greatest films of all time.

Edward Scissorhands (1990)

Edward Scissorhands
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tim Burton, starring Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest, Anthony Michael Hall
Rated PG-13

Edward Scissorhands tells the story of an artificial man named Edward, who was created by an inventor who died before finishing him. With scissors for hands, Edward is left alone in his creator's eerie gothic mansion until a suburban family discovers him and he is taken in. Despite his gentle nature, Edward's scissorhands make him an outcast in the suburban town and he soon finds himself caught between innocent love and menacing villains. Ultimately, Edward must confront his own loneliness and the townspeople’s fear of the unknown in order to find his place in the world.

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

The Manchurian Candidate
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From John Frankenheimer, starring Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Janet Leigh, Angela Lansbury
Rated PG-13

The Manchurian Candidate is a 1962 political thriller directed by John Frankenheimer and starring Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey and Janet Leigh. It is based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Richard Condon and tells the story of a former Korean War POW who is brainwashed and then politically exploited for a sinister purpose. The film follows the former war hero, Sgt. Raymond Shaw, as he is manipulated by his Communist handlers to become an unwitting assassin. With the help of his former army buddy, Major Bennett Marco, Raymond attempts to uncover the truth behind his brainwashing and the other soldiers who have been similarly manipulated. In a race against time, Marco and Raymond must find a way to prevent Raymond from being used as an unknowing pawn in an international political conspiracy.

In Cold Blood (1967)

In Cold Blood
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Brooks, starring Robert Blake, Scott Wilson, John Forsythe, Paul Stewart
Rated R

In Cold Blood is a 1967 crime drama film directed by Richard Brooks and based on Truman Capote's true crime novel of the same name. The film follows the story of two men, Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, who brutally murder a family of four in Holcomb, Kansas in 1959. The film follows the men on their journey from the crime to their eventual capture and execution. Along the way, the story highlights their motivations, their conversations and their mental states. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards and won two, including Best Cinematography and Best Supporting Actor for Robert Blake's portrayal of Perry Smith. In Cold Blood remains one of the most iconic films of its time, exploring the depths of human depravity alongside the power of justice and redemption.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008)

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett, Tilda Swinton, Julia Ormond
Rated PG-13

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a 2008 film directed by David Fincher, based on a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The movie follows the life of Benjamin Button, a man who is born in his eighties and ages backwards. Despite his unusual condition, he is determined to make the most of his life and tries to live it to the fullest. Along the way, he meets and falls in love with a dance instructor, Daisy, and lives a quite extraordinary life filled with love, heartbreak, and a few secrets. In the end, Benjamin discovers that life is not what is expected and that it is full of surprises.

 



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