Movies About Education And Teaching

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Movies About Education And Teaching

Thinking about Movies About Education And Teaching, there are so many movies who explored this topic. Here are 25 of our favorites.

3 Idiots (2009)

3 Idiots
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Rajkumar Hirani, starring Aamir Khan, Madhavan, Mona Singh, Sharman Joshi
Rated PG-13

3 Idiots is a Bollywood comedy drama film directed by Rajkumar Hirani. It stars Aamir Khan, R. Madhavan, Sharman Joshi, Kareena Kapoor, and Boman Irani. The story follows three friends who, while studying at the Indian Institute of Technology, try to navigate their way through the pressures of academic life. The movie follows their journey of self-discovery as they challenge societal norms and strive to achieve their dreams. The film focuses on the value of friendship and encourages people to pursue their dreams regardless of their parents' wishes and society's expectations. Despite its humorous elements, the movie also touches on serious issues such as suicide, gender inequality, and the value of education. The film was a massive box office success, becoming the highest-grossing Indian film of all time, and was praised for its creativity, heartwarming story, and brilliant acting.

A Separation (2011)

A Separation
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Asghar Farhadi, starring Payman Maadi, Leila Hatami, Sareh Bayat, Shahab Hosseini
Rated PG-13

A Separation is a 2011 drama film written and directed by Asghar Farhadi, starring Leila Hatami, Peyman Maadi, Shahab Hosseini, Sareh Bayat, and Sarina Farhadi. The film follows a married Iranian couple living in Tehran who separate due to both wanting different things out of life. Simin wants to leave Iran to provide a better life for their daughter Termeh, while Nader wants to stay to take care of his father, who has Alzheimer's. The couple goes to court to try to resolve their differences, but the judge rules that Simin will have to leave the house, and Nader will have to hire a caregiver for his father. Nader hires Razieh, a young, religious woman who is desperate for the money. Soon, a series of events unfolds which leads to tragedy, as the couple’s separation has unforeseen consequences for everyone involved. The movie showcases the complexity of modern Iranian society, and its themes of morality, justice, and faith. It won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2012 and has been praised for its honest and realistic portrayal of a family in crisis.

The Hunt (2012)

The Hunt
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Thomas Vinterberg, starring Mads Mikkelsen, Thomas Bo Larsen, Annika Wedderkopp, Lasse Fogelstrøm
Rated R

The Hunt is a 2012 Danish drama film directed by Thomas Vinterberg and written by Tobias Lindholm and Vinterberg. The film stars Mads Mikkelsen as Lucas, a man falsely accused of a heinous crime by his own community after a young girl makes an unfounded accusation against him. When the townspeople turn against him, Lucas is forced to fight back to restore his reputation and prove his innocence. The film follows Lucas' struggle against an escalating tide of public opinion, which creates a mob mentality, threatening to destroy his life. The Hunt was the first narrative feature film to be shot with the new digital Arri Alexa camera. It won numerous awards, including the Jury Prize at Cannes, the Bodil Award for Best Film, and earned Mads Mikkelsen the award for Best Actor at the 2012 European Film Awards.

A Beautiful Mind (2001)

A Beautiful Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Russell Crowe, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Christopher Plummer
Rated PG-13

A Beautiful Mind (2001) is a biographical drama directed by Ron Howard and starring Russell Crowe as Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Nash. The film follows Nash as he struggles with mental illness while journeying through Princeton, MIT, and Harvard during his outstanding career as a professor of mathematics. Nash is portrayed as a socially awkward genius with a brilliant mind that is both a blessing and a curse. He eventually overcomes his paranoia and schizophrenia to win the Nobel Prize and reunite with his wife and son. The film touches on themes of love, loss, redemption, and the power of the human spirit.

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Robin Williams, Robert Sean Leonard, Ethan Hawke, Josh Charles
Rated PG

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 American drama film directed by Peter Weir and written by Tom Schulman. Set at the conservative and aristocratic Welton Academy in New England in 1959, the film tells the story of an English teacher, John Keating (played by Robin Williams) who inspires his students through his unconventional teaching methods and his love of poetry. Keating encourages his students to "seize the day" and make their lives extraordinary. The story follows the journeys of the students as they confront their fears and struggle with issues such as freedom, identity, courage and belonging. With the support of their teacher, the students ultimately come to understand the importance of standing up for what they believe in and being true to themselves. The film was a critical and commercial success, earning Robin Williams an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role, and it has since become a classic of American cinema.

Goodbye, Children (1987)

Goodbye, Children
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Louis Malle, starring Gaspard Manesse, Raphael Fejtö, Francine Racette, Stanislas Carré de Malberg
Rated PG

Goodbye, Children is a 1987 French drama film directed by Louis Malle. The film tells the story of two boys, Julien (Stanislas Carré de Malberg) and Jean (Raphael Fejtö), who are living in a Catholic-run boarding school in occupied France during World War II. Julien is a devout Catholic while Jean is Jewish. The school is eventually forced to comply with Nazi orders and send the Jewish students away, leaving Jean in distress. Julien is torn between his loyalty to his friend and his loyalty to his faith. When the order comes to give up the Jewish children, Julien is forced to make an impossible decision and must say goodbye to his best friend. The film follows the boys' struggle to come to terms with a cruel world that forces them to make difficult choices.

Almost Famous (2000)

Almost Famous
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Cameron Crowe, starring Billy Crudup, Patrick Fugit, Kate Hudson, Frances McDormand
Rated R

Almost Famous is a 2000 comedy-drama film written and directed by Cameron Crowe. It stars Patrick Fugit as William Miller, a teenage journalist writing for Rolling Stone magazine while touring with the fictional rock band Stillwater. The film follows Miller as he discovers the world of rock and roll and is drawn into the music and lifestyle of the band members. Along the way, he falls in love with the band's lead singer, Penny Lane (Kate Hudson), and has to juggle his career, his relationship with Penny, and his family's expectations. The film also stars Billy Crudup, Frances McDormand, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Jason Lee in supporting roles. The film earned critical acclaim and was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (McDormand), Best Original Screenplay (Crowe), and Best Cinematography (John Toll).

Boyhood (2014)

Boyhood
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Linklater, starring Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Elijah Smith
Rated R

Boyhood is a 2014 American drama film written, directed, and produced by Richard Linklater. The film follows the life of Mason Evans Jr. (Ellar Coltrane) from age five to age eighteen, as he grows up with his divorced parents (Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette). It is a coming-of-age story, as Mason learns to cope with the challenges of life as he transitions into adulthood. Along the way, he experiences the joys of youth, the struggles of growing up, and the complexities of relationships. He discovers more about himself, his family, and the world around him. The film was shot from 2002 to 2013, with a gap of a few days each year, which allows the audience to watch Mason grow up in real time.

To Be and to Have (2002)

To Be and to Have
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Nicolas Philibert, starring Georges Lopez, Alizé, Axel Thouvenin, Guillaume
Rated Not Rated

"To Be and to Have" is a French documentary film from 2002 directed by Nicolas Philibert, which follows the daily life of a one-room schoolhouse in rural France. The film focuses on the teacher, Georges Lopez, and his twelve students, ranging in age from four to eleven. It celebrates the simplicity of the school, where all the students learn the same material, regardless of their individual abilities. Throughout the film, the teacher is seen engaging the students in various lessons, activities, and conversations, helping them to grow as individuals. Ultimately, the film shows the importance of the humble one-room schoolhouse as a place of learning, friendship, and love.

The Children's Hour (1961)

The Children's Hour
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From William Wyler, starring Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, James Garner, Miriam Hopkins
Rated Not Rated

The Children's Hour is a 1961 drama film directed by William Wyler, based on the 1934 play of the same name by Lillian Hellman. It stars Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, and James Garner. The plot focuses on two female teachers at a New England girls' school. When one of their students, Mary Tilford, gets into trouble, she retaliates by accusing them of having a lesbian relationship. This leads to a scandal that destroys the teachers' careers and lives, and causes serious tensions in their relationships with others. The film explores themes of homosexuality, prejudice, and power dynamics within relationships.

The Chorus (2004)

The Chorus
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Christophe Barratier, starring Gérard Jugnot, François Berléand, Jean-Baptiste Maunier, Kad Merad
Rated PG-13

The Chorus (Les Choristes) is a 2004 French musical drama film directed by Christophe Barratier. The story is set in 1949, and follows Clément Mathieu (Gérard Jugnot), a middle-aged music teacher who arrives at a boarding school for delinquent boys. Initially scorned by the boys and the headmaster, Mathieu gradually earns their respect and teaches them the joy of music through singing in a choir. Through his influence, the boys are ultimately able to rise above their difficult circumstances and follow their dreams. The film was a critical and commercial success, winning several awards, including a César for Best Film, Best Music, and Best Screenplay.

The Breakfast Club (1985)

The Breakfast Club
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From John Hughes, starring Emilio Estevez, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, Ally Sheedy
Rated R

The Breakfast Club is a 1985 American teen comedy-drama film written, produced, and directed by John Hughes. The film follows five teenagers—a jock (Andrew), a princess (Claire), a brain (Brian), an outsider (Allison), and a criminal (John Bender)—as they spend a Saturday detention together in their high school library. In the course of the day, they learn about each other and come to recognize their common struggles and bond. Despite their differences, the group ultimately shares a deeper understanding and compassion for one another, which is reflected in the film’s conclusion. Along the way, the teens also come to recognize and confront the deeply rooted issues that led to their detention in the first place, as well as the false perceptions they each held of one another.

Flipped (2010)

Flipped
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Rob Reiner, starring Madeline Carroll, Callan McAuliffe, Rebecca De Mornay, Anthony Edwards
Rated PG

Flipped is a romantic comedy-drama directed by Rob Reiner, based on the novel of the same name by Wendelin Van Draanen. Set in the 1960s, the film follows the story of two 8th-grade neighbors, Bryce and Juli, as they go through the tumultuous process of falling in love for the first time. As the two flip back and forth between love and hate, they learn important lessons about the true meaning of love, friendship and family. The film follows the ups and downs of their relationship as they grow up and their feelings continue to develop. Along the way, they discover that sometimes love isn't easy, but it always worth it.

Detachment (2011)

Detachment
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Tony Kaye, starring Adrien Brody, Christina Hendricks, Marcia Gay Harden, Lucy Liu
Rated Not Rated

Detachment is a drama film directed by Tony Kaye and released in 2011. The film follows Henry Barthes, a substitute teacher with a troubled past. He moves from one school to another, attempting to remain emotionally detached from his students and the other faculty members. However, as he gets to know the students, he becomes more and more emotionally involved in their lives. Through his interactions with the students and staff, Henry discovers the importance of forging meaningful connections. He also finds himself helping the students and faculty to confront their own issues, ultimately leading to a healing process for all involved. By the end of the film, Henry has achieved a newfound understanding of the importance of connecting with others and forming meaningful relationships.

Billy Elliot (2000)

Billy Elliot
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Stephen Daldry, starring Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, Jean Heywood, Jamie Draven
Rated R

Billy Elliot is a 2000 British drama film directed by Stephen Daldry. Set in a small town in England, the film follows the story of 11-year-old Billy, whose father and older brother are struggling miners on strike. Billy discovers a talent for dance and must overcome the narrow-mindedness of the local community and his own family in order to pursue his dream of becoming a professional dancer. With the support of his teacher, Mrs. Wilkinson, and his best friend, Michael, Billy works hard to hone his craft while facing emotional struggles and prejudice. In the end, his talent and tenacity win out and Billy is able to pursue his dream.

Freedom Writers (2007)

Freedom Writers
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Richard LaGravenese, starring Hilary Swank, Imelda Staunton, Patrick Dempsey, Scott Glenn
Rated PG-13

Freedom Writers is a 2007 drama starring Hilary Swank and directed by Richard LaGravenese. The film tells the story of an idealistic young teacher, Erin Gruwell (Swank), who takes a position at a predominantly minority high school in Long Beach, California in 1994. Despite the hatred and prejudice of her students, she is determined to make a difference in their lives and encourages them to express themselves through writing. Through her dedication and perseverance, she is able to build a strong relationship with her students and inspire them to work hard and make positive changes in their lives. The story is based on the real-life experience of Erin Gruwell, who wrote the best-selling book, "The Freedom Writers Diary".

Spellbound (2002)

Spellbound
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jeffrey Blitz, starring Angela Arenivar, Ubaldo Arenivar, Jorge Arenivar, Scott McGarraugh
Rated G

Spellbound is a 2002 documentary directed by Jeffrey Blitz about the 1999 National Spelling Bee. The film follows eight children from different parts of the United States as they prepare for and compete in the annual spelling bee. It shows the dedication and ambition of these kids as they strive for glory and the various pressures they face from their families, schools and their own expectations. In the end, it is a story of hope, courage, and determination that will leave viewers feeling inspired.

To Sir, with Love (1967)

To Sir, with Love
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From James Clavell, starring Sidney Poitier, Judy Geeson, Christian Roberts, Suzy Kendall
Rated Approved

To Sir, with Love is a classic British drama film released in 1967. Directed by James Clavell, the movie follows idealistic engineer Mark Thackeray (Sidney Poitier) who takes a job teaching at a rough East End school in London. Initially, Thackeray finds himself at odds with his unruly students, but slowly wins them over with kindness and understanding. As Thackeray's students come to respect him and learn from him, the teacher also learns valuable lessons in life. In the end, Thackeray and his students realize that, for them, there can be no greater reward than the knowledge that comes with learning and the experience of growing up.

A Little Princess (1995)

A Little Princess
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Alfonso Cuarón, starring Liesel Matthews, Eleanor Bron, Liam Cunningham, Rusty Schwimmer
Rated G

A Little Princess is an enchanting, family-friendly film directed by Alfonso Cuarón. It follows the story of Sara Crewe, an imaginative young girl whose wealthy father leaves her at a prestigious boarding school in New York. When her father is reported missing in action in World War I, Sara is left in the care of the school's strict headmistress, Miss Minchin. Despite the harsh environment, Sara's cheerful personality and positive outlook on life remain undaunted. After the school learns of her father's financial demise, Sara is demoted to a servant and forced to do hard labor. Despite her struggles, she continues to keep her dreams alive through her vivid imagination, believing that she is still a little princess. As she finds solace in her kind-hearted friend, Becky, and her loyal friend, Lottie, help arrives in the form of a mysterious benefactor. It is revealed that Sara's father is still alive and well, and Sara is able to return to her former life. The film ends with Sara and her father reunited, and the students of the school uniting to celebrate the reunion.

The Heart of the Game (2005)

The Heart of the Game
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Ward Serrill, starring Darnellia Russell, Bill Resler, Ludacris, Devon Crosby Helms
Rated PG-13

The Heart of the Game is a documentary directed by Ward Serrill which follows the ups and downs of an underdog high school girls' basketball team, the Seattle Roosevelt Roughriders, over the course of six seasons. Led by eccentric, inspiring, and controversial coach Bill Resler, the team, which included Resler’s daughter, goes through a rollercoaster ride of success and hardships, both on and off the court. Through it all, Resler never loses sight of his commitment to helping these young women find their own passion and talent, while also teaching them the importance of teamwork, sportsmanship, and loyalty. By the end of the film, the Roughriders manage to rise from the ashes and make it to the state championships. The Heart of the Game is an inspiring story of camaraderie and determination in the face of adversity.

The Great Debaters (2007)

The Great Debaters
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Denzel Washington, starring Denzel Washington, Forest Whitaker, Kimberly Elise, Nate Parker
Rated PG-13

The Great Debaters is a 2007 drama directed by Denzel Washington and starring Forest Whitaker, Denzel Washington, Jurnee Smollett, and Nate Parker. The film tells the story of the 1930s debate team from the small, all-black Wiley College led by professor Melvin B. Tolson (Washington). After successfully debating Harvard University in a practice match, the team is invited to compete in the national championship. Along the way, they must confront racial prejudice, personal tragedy, and their own self-doubts. Despite the long odds and the challenges they face, the team ultimately perseveres and makes history.

The Class (2008)

The Class
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Laurent Cantet, starring François Bégaudeau, Agame Malembo-Emene, Angélica Sancio, Arthur Fogel
Rated PG-13

The Class is an acclaimed French drama film directed by Laurent Cantet. It follows François Marin, a teacher at a diverse inner-city middle school in Paris, as he interacts with his class of students and struggles to keep order while trying to impart knowledge. Through his interactions with his students, the audience is exposed to the complexities of the relationships between teachers and students, as well as the emotions and challenges associated with teaching a difficult class. As the school year progresses, François and his students learn more about each other, and he discovers the power of his role as a teacher. The film explores themes of education, adolescence, and the power of relationships to affect change.

The Book Thief (2013)

The Book Thief
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Brian Percival, starring Sophie Nélisse, Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, Ben Schnetzer
Rated PG-13

The Book Thief tells the story of Liesel Meminger (Sophie Nélisse), a young girl who is sent to live with a foster family in Nazi Germany during World War II. Liesel is illiterate when she arrives, but with the help of her foster father, Hans Hubermann (Geoffrey Rush), she learns to read and discovers a love of books. She begins “borrowing” books from the Nazi book burnings and brings them home to read. When a Jewish refugee, Max (Ben Schnetzer), takes refuge in the Hubermanns’ basement, Liesel helps him by sneaking food to him and reading books to him. As the war progresses, Liesel’s life is filled with loss and sorrow, but she finds solace in her books, and ultimately discovers courage, strength, and hope.

All About Lily Chou-Chou (2001)

All About Lily Chou-Chou
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Shunji Iwai, starring Hayato Ichihara, Shûgo Oshinari, Ayumi Ito, Takao Osawa
Rated Unrated

All About Lily Chou-Chou is a 2001 Japanese drama film directed by Shunji Iwai. It follows the story of a 14-year-old boy named Yuichi Hasumi and his intense obsession with the fictional idol singer Lily Chou-Chou. As Yuichi navigates his way through high school, he faces bullying from classmates, which leads him down a dark path as he attempts to escape from reality and into his own world. Along the way, he is joined by his best friend, Hoshino, and a mysterious girl, Shiori. Through their journey, the film explores themes of loneliness, the power of music, and the nuances of the internet age.

Still Alice (2014)

Still Alice
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Richard Glatzer, Wash Westmoreland, starring Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart, Kate Bosworth
Rated PG-13

Still Alice is a 2014 American drama film written and directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland. The film stars Julianne Moore as Alice Howland, a linguistics professor diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease. The film follows Alice's struggle to come to terms with her diagnosis, and her family's efforts to support her throughout the process. Alice is forced to make difficult decisions on how to best manage her changing life and the effects it has on her relationships. The film was praised for its portrayal of Alzheimer's and Julianne Moore's performance, earning her an Oscar for Best Actress.

 



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