Best Weird Movie

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Best Weird Movie

Many movies have reported on Best Weird Movie. We assembled 25 of our favorites.

The Shining (1980)

The Shining
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lloyd, Scatman Crothers
Rated R

The Shining is a 1980 psychological horror film based on the 1977 novel of the same name by Stephen King. Directed by Stanley Kubrick, the film stars Jack Nicholson as Jack Torrance, Shelley Duvall as his wife Wendy Torrance, and Danny Lloyd as their son Danny Torrance. The Torrance family moves to the isolated Overlook Hotel in the Colorado Rockies for the winter, where Jack is employed as the off-season caretaker. Danny possesses "the shining", psychic abilities that enable him to see into the hotel's horrific past. As Jack's sanity unravels, he grows increasingly violent and Wendy and Danny are left in fear for their lives. The Shining is a gripping and terrifying exploration of insanity, family, and the supernatural.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Michel Gondry, starring Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Gerry Robert Byrne
Rated R

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a 2004 romantic science fiction drama directed by Michel Gondry. It tells the story of a couple, Joel (Jim Carrey) and Clementine (Kate Winslet), who go through a painful breakup, only to discover that Clementine has had her memories of their relationship erased. In an effort to forget Clementine and move on, Joel decides to get the same procedure done. As he undergoes the procedure, he begins to re-experience his memories of the relationship and realizes that he still loves Clementine. In the end, Joel chooses to keep the memories of Clementine, allowing himself to fully experience the pain of their separation as well as the joy of their love.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

2001: A Space Odyssey
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, Daniel Richter
Rated G

2001: A Space Odyssey is a science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick in 1968. It follows a voyage to Jupiter with the sentient computer HAL after the discovery of a mysterious black monolith affecting human evolution. The film deals with themes of evolutionary transformation, technology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial life. It is a meditation on the implications of technology and its role in human development. The story is told mostly through visuals, with minimalist dialogue and no descriptive narrative. The film is divided into four main parts: "The Dawn of Man", "TMA-1", "Jupiter Mission", and "Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite". It has won numerous awards and is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential films ever made.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 darkly satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. The film follows the story of Alex (Malcolm McDowell), a charismatic and dangerous anti-hero who leads a gang of thugs on a violent crime spree in a futuristic London. When Alex is apprehended and convicted of murder, he is subjected to an experimental form of rehabilitation involving mind control and brainwashing. As Alex struggles to adapt to the new world he has been forced into, he must confront his violent past and his own inner turmoil. With its mix of dark humor, intense violence, and bold visuals, A Clockwork Orange is a controversial classic.

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

Pan's Labyrinth
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Guillermo del Toro, starring Ivana Baquero, Ariadna Gil, Sergi López, Maribel Verdú
Rated R

Pan's Labyrinth is a 2006 Mexican-Spanish dark fantasy film written and directed by Guillermo del Toro. Set in the Falangist Spain of 1944, the story follows Ofelia, a young girl who is sent to stay with her pregnant stepmother, Carmen, and her stepfather, Vidal, a sadistic army captain. Ofelia soon discovers a mysterious labyrinth in the nearby woods and soon realizes that it holds a connection to an underground world of fantastical creatures and secrets. With the help of a faun, Ofelia must complete three dangerous tasks in order to save her kingdom, while at the same time trying to survive Vidal's oppressive rule. Along the way, Ofelia discovers the power of hope, courage, and love, as she confronts the monsters that haunt her world.

Groundhog Day (1993)

Groundhog Day
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott, Stephen Tobolowsky
Rated PG

Groundhog Day is a 1993 American fantasy comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Ramis and Danny Rubin. The film stars Bill Murray as Phil Connors, a cynical television weatherman who is sent to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, to report on Groundhog Day. When Connors finds himself living the same day over and over again, he soon realizes he must make the most of every day to find a way out of the repeating time loop. Filled with humor, Groundhog Day is a heartwarming, and often heartbreaking, story about learning to appreciate and live each day to its fullest.

Persona (1966)

Persona
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Ingmar Bergman, starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook, Gunnar Björnstrand
Rated Not Rated

Persona is a 1966 film directed by Ingmar Bergman and starring Liv Ullmann and Bibi Andersson. The film is a psychological drama that follows two women, Elisabet Vogler (Ullmann) and Alma (Andersson). Elisabet is an actress who has suddenly stopped speaking, and Alma is a nurse who is assigned to take care of her. As Alma attempts to help Elisabet regain her ability to speak, the two women embark on a journey of psychological exploration. Through conversations, dream sequences and flashbacks, the film explores issues of identity, responsibility and communication between the two women. In the end, Elisabet has regained her ability to speak and the two women have swapped identities in some way, as if reflecting the film's main theme of exploring the boundaries between two people.

Donnie Darko (2001)

Donnie Darko
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Kelly, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Jena Malone, Mary McDonnell, Holmes Osborne
Rated R

Donnie Darko is a psychological thriller set in the suburbs of 1988 Virginia. Donnie, a troubled teenager, is plagued by visions of a large bunny rabbit that manipulates him to commit a series of crimes, after narrowly escaping a bizarre accident. As he tries to figure out why he is being guided by this mysterious creature, he learns that the world may be heading for destruction and his only hope of saving it is by embracing his destiny and unlocking the secrets of time travel. With the help of his new girlfriend and a deranged science teacher, Donnie navigates the dark corners of his reality and discovers a terrifying, yet extraordinary, destiny that may be beyond his control.

Black Swan (2010)

Black Swan
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Darren Aronofsky, starring Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel, Winona Ryder
Rated R

Black Swan is a psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky. It stars Natalie Portman as Nina, a ballerina who is competing for the lead role in a new production of Swan Lake. She is a perfectionist who is pushed to her limits by her ambitious and domineering ballet director, Thomas Leroy. As the competition heats up, Nina is driven to the brink of her physical and mental limitations. She finds herself trapped between light and dark, dreaming and reality, beauty and chaos. As the pressure builds, Nina begins to unravel and is pulled into a dangerous and seductive world of the Black Swan.

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes, Ruth Gordon, Sidney Blackmer
Rated Approved

Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski. It stars Mia Farrow as Rosemary Woodhouse, a young wife and soon-to-be mother who grows increasingly suspicious that her eccentric neighbors and seemingly attentive husband (John Cassavetes) have sinister motives regarding her unborn child. As her paranoia grows, Rosemary begins to believe that her baby is part of a Satanic cult's sinister plot. The film follows Rosemary as she struggles to uncover the truth and protect her baby from harm. The film ultimately culminates in a shocking and twisted conclusion.

Love Exposure (2008)

Love Exposure
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sion Sono, starring Takahiro Nishijima, Hikari Mitsushima, Sakura Andô, Yutaka Shimizu
Rated Unrated

Love Exposure is a 2008 Japanese romantic comedy-drama written and directed by Sion Sono. It follows Yu, a young man who was raised a Catholic and finds himself torn between his father's strict religious upbringing and his growing feelings for Yoko, a mysterious girl with a dark past. Through a series of misunderstandings and misadventures, Yu's journey to find love leads him down a path of delinquency and sexual exploration. Along the way, he learns to let go of his guilt and embrace his identity. The film is a unique exploration of religion, sexuality, and family, as Yu rediscovers his faith in the power of love.

Akira (1988)

Akira
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Katsuhiro Ôtomo, starring Mitsuo Iwata, Nozomu Sasaki, Mami Koyama, Tesshô Genda
Rated R

Akira is a 1988 cyberpunk anime film directed by Katsuhiro Ôtomo. Set in a post-apocalyptic Neo-Tokyo in 2019, the film follows Shotaro Kaneda and his biker gang as they battle against a powerful psychic named Akira. Kaneda and his friends discover that Akira is an experimental subject of the government, capable of immense destructive power. With the help of a group of espers and other allies, Kaneda must battle the government to save both Akira and Neo-Tokyo. As the situation escalates, Kaneda must find a way to control Akira’s power while fending off the government’s forces and preventing a nuclear disaster. The film is widely regarded as one of the greatest animated films of all time, and has been praised for its revolutionary animation and its thrilling story.

Mulholland Drive (2001)

Mulholland Drive
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Jeanne Bates
Rated R

Mulholland Drive is an American neo-noir mystery film directed and written by David Lynch. It stars Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, and Justin Theroux. The story follows an aspiring actress named Betty Elms (Watts) who arrives in Los Angeles and meets an amnesiac woman (Harring) at an apartment that belongs to Betty's aunt. As the two women investigate the mystery of the woman's identity, they are pulled into a dark and dangerous world of secrets, lies, and self-deception. The film contains elements of horror, fantasy, and surrealism and is known for its complex narrative structure and ambiguous ending. It was a critical and commercial success and was nominated for numerous awards, including four Academy Awards.

Brazil (1985)

Brazil
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Terry Gilliam, starring Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond
Rated R

Brazil is a 1985 dystopian satirical black comedy film directed by Terry Gilliam and written by Gilliam, Charles McKeown, and Tom Stoppard. The film stars Jonathan Pryce as a low-level bureaucrat in a dystopian future society who discovers a mistake in a government paperwork and becomes the target of an investigation. He is aided by a renegade hacker, played by Robert De Niro, and a daydreaming lover, played by Kim Greist. The film portrays a future in which society has been taken over by a government obsessed with bureaucracy and paperwork, and its citizens are subjected to oppressive surveillance. With its darkly comedic tone, Brazil is a cautionary tale of how modern society can become dehumanized and mechanized by bureaucracy. The film has become a cult classic and is considered one of the greatest films of all time.

The Holy Mountain (1973)

The Holy Mountain
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Alejandro Jodorowsky, starring Alejandro Jodorowsky, Horacio Salinas, Zamira Saunders, Juan Ferrara
Rated R

The Holy Mountain is a surrealist fantasy film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. It follows the journey of a mysterious thief, who is guided by a spiritual alchemist on a quest to find the secret of immortality and ascend to the Holy Mountain. Along the way, the thief and his companions encounter colorful characters and situations that test their strength and courage. Themes of greed, corruption, power, and spirituality are explored throughout the film. In the end, the thief and his companions are successful in their quest, attaining enlightenment and wisdom.

Being John Malkovich (1999)

Being John Malkovich
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, John Malkovich
Rated R

Being John Malkovich tells the story of Craig Schwartz, a puppeteer who takes a job as a file clerk on the 7 1/2th floor of an office building. While there, he discovers a secret portal that leads into the mind of actor John Malkovich. It is then revealed that the portal allows others to take control of Malkovich’s body for short periods of time. Soon, Craig and his wife, Maxine, start selling trips inside Malkovich’s head to the highest bidder. As their scheme spirals out of control, Craig and Maxine must confront their own feelings of jealousy and inadequacy, while Malkovich struggles to reclaim his identity.

The Fall (2006)

The Fall
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Tarsem Singh, starring Lee Pace, Catinca Untaru, Justine Waddell, Kim Uylenbroek
Rated R

The Fall is a 2006 fantasy film directed by Tarsem Singh and starring Lee Pace, Catinca Untaru, Justine Waddell, and Marcus Wesley. It tells the story of a bedridden, Hollywood stuntman (Pace) convalescing in a Los Angeles hospital in the 1920s, who befriends a young Romanian immigrant girl (Untaru). In order to escape his current reality, he tells her a fantastical story of five mythical heroes who embark on a quest to rescue a fallen princess. As the girl listens to the tale, her imagination begins to blur the boundaries between fantasy and reality. The film has garnered critical acclaim for its beautiful visuals and inventive narrative structure, and has won several awards including the Grand Jury Prize at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. It has since gone on to become a cult classic.

Johnny Got His Gun (1971)

Johnny Got His Gun
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Dalton Trumbo, starring Timothy Bottoms, Kathy Fields, Marsha Hunt, Jason Robards
Rated R

Johnny Got His Gun is a 1971 American anti-war drama film directed by Dalton Trumbo and starring Timothy Bottoms. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Trumbo that was published in 1939. It tells the story of Joe Bonham, a young American soldier in World War I who is severely injured and left without arms, legs, eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. His mind however is still functioning, and he is conscious of his surroundings and struggles to communicate with the people around him. As he relives his life, he reflects on the horrors of war and the need for peace. The film is an unflinching look at the physical and psychological effects of war on the individual, showing how a single person's life can be drastically changed by a conflict. The movie was critically acclaimed upon its release and is still regarded as one of the most powerful anti-war films ever made.

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Luis Buñuel, starring Fernando Rey, Delphine Seyrig, Paul Frankeur, Bulle Ogier
Rated PG

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a surrealist comedy directed by Luis Buñuel, released in 1972. It tells the story of a group of upper-class friends who continually attempt to engage in a formal dinner, but whose attempts are constantly thwarted by bizarre obstacles. The film follows the characters as they explore their dreams and fantasies, and grapple with the strange, unexpected and often absurd occurrences in their lives. Throughout the film, the characters often find themselves in a continuous state of surrealism, which is represented through dream sequences, absurdist humor and absurd situations. The film also comments on the empty yet privileged lifestyles of the bourgeoisie, and the shallowness of the upper class.

Blue Velvet (1986)

Blue Velvet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Laura Dern
Rated R

Blue Velvet is a 1986 American neo-noir mystery thriller film directed and co-written by David Lynch. College student Jeffrey Beaumont returns to his idyllic hometown after his father suffers a stroke, and discovers a severed human ear in a field. Jeffrey's investigation into the ear leads him to uncover a convoluted mystery involving a distressed nightclub singer, Dorothy Vallens, her violent husband, Frank Booth, and a mysterious criminal underworld. Along the way, Jeffrey confronts his own evil desires, as he struggles to make sense of the bizarre events around him. Blue Velvet is a disturbing exploration of the dark underbelly of small town America, and features memorable performances from Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper and Laura Dern.

Waking Life (2001)

Waking Life
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Richard Linklater, starring Ethan Hawke, Trevor Jack Brooks, Lorelei Linklater, Wiley Wiggins
Rated R

Waking Life is a rotoscope-animated philosophical film directed by Richard Linklater. The film follows a young man as he drifts through a series of dream-like scenarios that explore the nature of reality, existence, and the meaning of life. Along the way, he meets a variety of characters who each have their own perspectives on the world and engage him in conversations about various aspects of philosophy and life. Through these encounters, the protagonist is able to gain better insight into the world around him and come to a greater understanding of his own place within it.

Fantastic Planet (1973)

Fantastic Planet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From René Laloux, starring Barry Bostwick, Jennifer Drake, Eric Baugin, Jean Topart
Rated PG

Fantastic Planet is a 1973 French animated science fiction film directed by René Laloux. Set on a distant planet called Ygam, the film tells the story of a human race called Oms, which is kept as domesticated pets by the blue-skinned alien race Druuns. The Oms live in fear of their masters, but one of them, named Terr, has the courage to escape and join a group of rebellious Oms. Together, they strive to overthrow the oppressive Druuns and take back control of the planet. The film is an allegorical commentary on imperialism, oppression, and man's mistreatment of the environment. It is also notable for its surreal, psychedelic visuals which make it an unforgettable classic of animation.

Adaptation. (2002)

Adaptation.
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring Nicolas Cage, Meryl Streep, Chris Cooper, Tilda Swinton
Rated R

Adaptation is a comedy-drama film directed by Spike Jonze about the life of screenwriter Charlie Kaufman. The story follows Charlie (Nicholas Cage) as he attempts to adapt the non-fiction book "The Orchid Thief" into a screenplay. Along the way, he struggles to overcome his own insecurities and fears and find success in Hollywood. He also has to deal with his twin brother Donald (also played by Nicholas Cage), who is seemingly living the life that Charlie has always wanted. The film follows Charlie's journey as he attempts to get his screenplay finished and ultimately find success.

The Fly (1986)

The Fly
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From David Cronenberg, starring Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis, John Getz, Joy Boushel
Rated R

The Fly is a 1986 science fiction-horror film directed by David Cronenberg. The story follows the transformation of scientist Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum) into a human-fly hybrid after a teleportation experiment gone wrong. Brundle becomes increasingly fly-like as he struggles to cope with his transformation and the consequences of his experiment. As his physical state deteriorates, Brundle descends into a monstrous, violent state of being with only his love interest Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis) able to humanize him. In the end, Brundle must make a desperate and heartbreaking choice between his human side and his fly state.

The Tenant (1976)

The Tenant
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Roman Polanski, Isabelle Adjani, Melvyn Douglas, Jo Van Fleet
Rated R

The Tenant is a psychological horror-thriller film directed by Roman Polanski and released in 1976. The film follows Trelkovsky (played by Polanski himself), a quiet and timid man who rents an old apartment in Paris. Soon, he begins to notice strange occurrences in the building and finds himself increasingly drawn into the bizarre behavior of his neighbors. As the film progresses, Trelkovsky's sanity begins to unravel as he attempts to unravel the mysteries of the building and its inhabitants, leading to a shocking and terrifying climax. The Tenant is a suspenseful and captivating film that explores themes of identity, paranoia and the psychological implications of being an outsider.

 



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