Movies Set In The 60's

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Movies Set In The 60's

For Movies Set In The 60's, there are so many directors exploring this topic. We listed 25 of our favorites.

Forrest Gump (1994)

Forrest Gump
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Robert Zemeckis, starring Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field
Rated PG-13

Forrest Gump is a 1994 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Eric Roth. The film stars Tom Hanks as the titular character, a kindhearted, naïve man from Alabama who witnesses, and in some cases influences, some of the defining events of the latter half of the 20th century in the United States. Through a series of flashbacks, Forrest recounts his life story to strangers while waiting at a bus stop. The film follows Forrest's life from childhood to adulthood, as he deals with a difficult mother, encounters the love of his life, Jenny, and is thrust into some of the defining moments of the 1960s and 1970s, including the Vietnam War, meeting President Lyndon B. Johnson, participating in the peace movement, and meeting John Lennon. Forrest also becomes a successful entrepreneur, transforming Bubba Gump Shrimp Company into a multi-million dollar business. The film has grossed over $677 million worldwide, making it one of the highest-grossing films of all time. It also garnered multiple awards and nominations, including six Academy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards. The film was well-received by critics, with praise for its

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
★★★★
★★★★
3.5 out of 4 stars

From Milos Forman, starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman, Peter Brocco
Rated R

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American drama film directed by Milos Forman, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Ken Kesey. It stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a criminal who fakes insanity to avoid prison work and is admitted to a mental institution, where he clashes with the oppressive Nurse Ratched. The film also features Louise Fletcher, William Redfield, Will Sampson, and Brad Dourif. The story follows McMurphy's rebellion against the oppressive nurse and her staff, as he encourages the other inmates to do the same. Through his defiance, McMurphy brings out the humanity and courage of the patients, and ultimately inspires them to stand up for their rights. In the end, McMurphy's streak of rebellion is cut short when he is forced to undergo a lobotomy. The film is a scathing indictment of mental health institutions, and an exploration of individualism and freedom of choice.

Green Book (2018)

Green Book
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Peter Farrelly, starring Viggo Mortensen, Mahershala Ali, Linda Cardellini, Sebastian Maniscalco
Rated PG-13

Green Book is a 2018 American biographical comedy-drama film directed by Peter Farrelly. The film is inspired by the true story of a tour of the Deep South in the 1960s by African-American classical and jazz pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) and Italian-American bouncer Tony Lip (Viggo Mortensen), who served as Shirley's driver and bodyguard. The film follows their journey as they navigate the racist Jim Crow-era South, relying on a book of safe places for African-Americans in the region. Along the way, the two men find common ground and form an unlikely friendship, which becomes a major turning point in both their lives. Ultimately, Green Book celebrates the transformative power of friendship and music in bringing together people from different backgrounds.

Catch Me If You Can (2002)

Catch Me If You Can
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Christopher Walken, Martin Sheen
Rated PG-13

Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 American biographical crime film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks. It is based on the true story of Frank Abagnale Jr., who, before his 19th birthday, successfully conned millions of dollars' worth of checks as a master impostor. After being arrested and placed on trial, Abagnale tells authorities his life story and cooperates with them to help capture other criminals like him. The film follows the story of Frank Abagnale Jr. (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) as he escapes from his home in New Rochelle, New York, and embarks on a journey as a con artist. He successfully passes himself off as a pilot, a doctor, and a lawyer all before his 19th birthday. Along the way, he meets and is pursued by an FBI agent, Carl Hanratty (played by Tom Hanks), who is determined to capture him and put him behind bars. Although Abagnale is eventually caught, he serves only a few years in prison and goes on to become a consultant for the FBI, helping to catch other criminals like himself. In the end, the film focuses on the themes of redemption, the

The Help (2011)

The Help
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tate Taylor, starring Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Octavia Spencer, Bryce Dallas Howard
Rated PG-13

The Help is a 2011 drama film based on the 2009 novel of the same name by Kathryn Stockett. Directed by Tate Taylor, the film stars Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, and Bryce Dallas Howard. Set in Jackson, Mississippi in the early 1960s, the film follows the story of three African-American maids who work in white households and the struggles they face in the Deep South. Through their friendship, they come together to create a book that tells the truth about what it's like to be black in an era of segregation and racism. The story is told from the perspectives of Skeeter (Stone), Aibileen (Davis), and Minny (Spencer) as they strive to overcome racism and prejudice in the segregated society of Jackson, Mississippi. With stirring performances and a powerful message, The Help is an emotionally charged and uplifting story of courage and friendship.

Woodstock (1970)

Woodstock
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Michael Wadleigh, starring Joan Baez, Richie Havens, Roger Daltrey, Joe Cocker
Rated R

Woodstock is a 1970 documentary film that captures the three-day music and arts festival of the same name. It was directed by Michael Wadleigh and was released by Warner Bros. The film follows the thousands of concert goers who traveled to Max Yasgur's farm in Bethel, New York to attend the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, between August 15th and 18th, 1969. The film features live performances from iconic artists such as The Who, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Richie Havens and many more. It also documents the stories of concert-goers as well as the counterculture and anti-war movement of the time. Many of the scenes in the film were shot in a cinéma vérité style, which helps to give the viewer an immersive experience of the event. While there are some staged moments in the film, these scenes are intended to reflect the mood and atmosphere of the event. Woodstock was a critical and commercial success upon its release in 1970, and it is now regarded as one of the most important and influential music documentaries ever made. It received the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 1971.

Monterey Pop (1968)

Monterey Pop
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From D.A. Pennebaker, starring Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix, Ravi Shankar, Country Joe McDonald
Rated Not Rated

Monterey Pop is a documentary film directed by D.A. Pennebaker that follows the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, an early precursor to the Woodstock Music Festival. The film includes live performances from some of the most iconic artists of the time, including Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Simon and Garfunkel, The Mamas and the Papas, and The Who, among others. The film also features interviews with some of the artists, including Ravi Shankar and Hugh Masekela, and captures the spirit of the event and the burgeoning counterculture movement of the 1960s. Monterey Pop is an essential document of the era and a celebration of music and youth culture at its best.

Bob Dylan: Dont Look Back (1967)

Bob Dylan: Dont Look Back
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From D.A. Pennebaker, starring Bob Dylan, Albert Grossman, Bob Neuwirth, Joan Baez
Rated Not Rated

Bob Dylan: Don't Look Back is a 1967 documentary film about American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, directed by documentary filmmaker D. A. Pennebaker. The film covers Dylan's 1965 concert tour of the United Kingdom, from April to May. It shows Dylan's creative process as he interacts with other people and the press. It also features Joan Baez, Donovan, Alan Price, and Albert Grossman. The film culminates with Dylan's famous performance of "Subterranean Homesick Blues", where he flips cue cards with lyrics written on them. As Dylan's tour progresses, the film captures the growing tension between Dylan and the press. It also captures Dylan's lifestyle changes as he transitions from acoustic to electric music. Don't Look Back is a classic documentary, and a must-see for any fan of Bob Dylan.

Midnight Cowboy (1969)

Midnight Cowboy
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From John Schlesinger, starring Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Sylvia Miles, John McGiver
Rated R

Midnight Cowboy is a 1969 American drama film directed by John Schlesinger. It stars Jon Voight as Joe Buck, a naive hustler from Texas, and Dustin Hoffman as Ratso Rizzo, a con man and ill-tempered outcast. The film follows the unlikely friendship that develops between the two men as they hustle their way through the streets of New York. Along the way, Joe discovers the harsh realities of life and love in the big city. The film won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and its theme song, "Everybody's Talkin'", became an international hit.

Gimme Shelter (1970)

Gimme Shelter
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Albert Maysles, David Maysles, Charlotte Zwerin, starring Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Mick Taylor, Charlie Watts
Rated GP

Gimme Shelter is a 1970 American documentary film directed by Albert and David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin that follows The Rolling Stones on their 1969 American tour. It is best remembered as a documentary of the tragic Altamont Free Concert, which was held at Altamont Speedway in California. The documentary captures the events leading up to the concert, the performance itself, and the events that followed. During the concert, a member of the Hells Angels, who had been hired to provide security, stabbed and killed an 18-year-old man in the audience. The film also explores the issues of class and race in America, as well as the idea of violence as a form of entertainment. It is a powerful and moving film that captures a moment in history that was full of both hope and tragedy.

Zodiac (2007)

Zodiac
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Fincher, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Anthony Edwards
Rated R

Zodiac is a 2007 American thriller film directed by David Fincher, based on the true story of the unsolved Zodiac Killer murders in the San Francisco Bay Area during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The film follows the story of cartoonist Robert Graysmith (Jake Gyllenhaal) and reporter Paul Avery (Robert Downey Jr.), who become obsessed with trying to discover the identity of the Zodiac Killer, an unknown serial killer who sent threatening letters and taunting cryptograms to the police and media. The investigations of Graysmith and Avery are paralleled with the story of the killer, played by John Carroll Lynch, who is never positively identified. As the investigations progress, the characters come to understand the killer's twisted motivations and methods, and come to realize that the case may never be solved.

The Theory of Everything (2014)

The Theory of Everything
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From James Marsh, starring Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones, Tom Prior, Sophie Perry
Rated PG-13

The Theory of Everything is a 2014 biographical drama film directed by James Marsh. It is based on the life of renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking and stars Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. The film follows the extraordinary life of Stephen Hawking, beginning with his days as a young student at Cambridge University. It chronicles his rise to fame and his relationship with Jane Wilde, the woman he fell in love with and later married. It follows Hawking's struggles with ALS, a debilitating motor neuron disease, as well as his incredible breakthroughs in understanding the mysteries of black holes and the universe. Ultimately, the film shows how Hawking, despite his illness, was able to live a full and rewarding life.

The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020)

The Trial of the Chicago 7
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Aaron Sorkin, starring Eddie Redmayne, Alex Sharp, Sacha Baron Cohen, Jeremy Strong
Rated R

The Trial of the Chicago 7 is a 2020 film written and directed by Aaron Sorkin. The film follows the events after the 1968 Democratic National Convention, when seven activists were charged with conspiracy and inciting a riot. The defendants are Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, and Lee Weiner. Together, they are known as the Chicago 7. Amidst a politically charged trial, the defendants face off against U.S. Attorney Richard Schultz, who is determined to prove their guilt. With shifting alliances, a relentless media presence, and a courtroom showdown, the trial leads to a powerful and unforgettable climax. The film highlights the importance of free speech and the power of peaceful protest, even in the face of political opposition.

When You're Strange (2009)

When You're Strange
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Tom DiCillo, starring Johnny Depp, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek
Rated R

When You're Strange is a 2009 documentary film, directed by Tom DiCillo, about the rock band The Doors. The film focuses on the band's story and their music, as seen through archival footage, interviews, and the band's music. It tells the story of the band's formation, their meteoric rise to fame, and their eventual split in the wake of Jim Morrison's death. The film features rare and never-before-seen footage of the band in their early days and interviews with some of the band's surviving members and friends. It also follows the band's creative process, from the writing of songs to the performances in which they brought them to life. When You're Strange is both a celebration of The Doors' music and a look at their legacy as one of the most influential and iconic rock bands of all time.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (2019)

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Quentin Tarantino, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, Emile Hirsch
Rated R

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood follows fading television star Rick Dalton and his longtime stunt double Cliff Booth as they navigate an industry they hardly recognize anymore. Set against the backdrop of the 1969 Hollywood, Dalton and Booth must contend with the changing landscape of the film industry, and the arrival of the notorious Charles Manson and his cult. With help from their new neighbor, the iconic actress and model Sharon Tate, the two find themselves caught up in a tumultuous and violent story that reshapes their lives and the entire city.

A Single Man (2009)

A Single Man
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Tom Ford, starring Colin Firth, Julianne Moore, Matthew Goode, Nicholas Hoult
Rated R

A Single Man is a 2009 American drama film directed by fashion designer Tom Ford, based on the novel of the same name by Christopher Isherwood. The film follows a day in the life of George Falconer (Colin Firth), an English professor living in Los Angeles in 1962. George is a middle-aged, gay, British college professor who is struggling to cope with the death of his longtime partner, Jim (Matthew Goode). George’s life has become an empty routine of lectures, drinks with colleagues, and solitary dinners. In an effort to keep his sanity, he begins to make plans for his own death, but when he meets a student (Nicholas Hoult) and an unexpected old flame (Julianne Moore), George begins to reconsider his decision. The film is a thoughtful and moving exploration of loss, loneliness, and hope in a world that often fails to provide solace or understanding.

Saving Mr. Banks (2013)

Saving Mr. Banks
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From John Lee Hancock, starring Emma Thompson, Tom Hanks, Annie Rose Buckley, Colin Farrell
Rated PG-13

Saving Mr. Banks is a 2013 historical drama film directed by John Lee Hancock and starring Tom Hanks, Emma Thompson, and Colin Farrell. The film follows the story of the development of the 1964 film Mary Poppins, with a focus on the film's author P.L. Travers (Thompson) and her interactions with Walt Disney (Hanks) while she was in Los Angeles to negotiate the rights to her book. The film takes place in 1961, when Travers visits Hollywood to negotiate the film rights to her book Mary Poppins with Walt Disney, who wants to make an animated film adaptation of the story. Travers is initially resistant to the idea and is determined to protect the integrity of her story and characters. After a series of meetings with Disney and his creative team, Travers gradually warms to the idea of a film adaptation, although Disney must still contend with her strong-willed nature. The film also flashes back to Travers' childhood in Australia, where her father (Farrell) was an alcoholic who squandered her inheritance. Viewers see how her experience of her father's alcoholism molded her views on life and creative works. In the end, Disney is able to secure the rights to

Selma (2014)

Selma
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Ava DuVernay, starring David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Oprah Winfrey, Tom Wilkinson
Rated PG-13

Selma is a historical drama about the voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965. It follows the events leading up to the marches, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s leadership of the movement, and the eventual passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The movie focuses on the personal struggles and sacrifices of Dr. King, as well as his relationship with his wife Coretta Scott King. It also depicts the violence and intimidation tactics used against the peaceful protesters, ultimately culminating in the death of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson at the hands of a state trooper. The movie paints a vivid and powerful picture of the civil rights movement and its importance in the struggle for racial justice.

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)

Inside Llewyn Davis
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Directors: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, starring Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, John Goodman, Garrett Hedlund
Rated R

Janis: Little Girl Blue (2015)

Janis: Little Girl Blue
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Amy Berg, starring Cat Power, Janis Joplin, Karleen Bennett, Laura Joplin
Rated TV-MA

Love & Mercy (2014)

Love & Mercy
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Bill Pohlad, starring John Cusack, Paul Dano, Elizabeth Banks, Paul Giamatti
Rated PG-13

An Education (2009)

An Education
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Lone Scherfig, starring Carey Mulligan, Peter Sarsgaard, Alfred Molina, Olivia Williams
Rated PG-13

Easy Rider (1969)

Easy Rider
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Dennis Hopper, starring Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson, Antonio Mendoza
Rated R

Across the Universe (2007)

Across the Universe
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Julie Taymor, starring Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess, Joe Anderson, Dana Fuchs
Rated PG-13

Hitchcock/Truffaut (2015)

Hitchcock/Truffaut
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Kent Jones, starring Wes Anderson, Peter Bogdanovich, David Fincher, Bob Balaban
Rated PG-13

 



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