Learned About Democracy Movies

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Learned About Democracy Movies

When it comes to Learned About Democracy Movies, there is no limit to the films who explored this feeling. Here are 17 of our favorites.

Casablanca (1942)

Casablanca
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains
Rated PG

Casablanca is a classic romantic drama set against the backdrop of World War II. Directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, the film follows Rick Blaine (Bogart), a cynical American expatriate who runs a nightclub in the Moroccan city of Casablanca. When Ilsa Lund (Bergman), a former lover of Rick's, and her husband Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid) arrive in the city, Rick must choose between his love for Ilsa and helping Laszlo escape to America to continue his fight against the Nazis. In the end, Rick makes the sacrifice of willingly letting Ilsa go with her husband, realizing that it is the right thing to do. The film is an iconic classic that has become one of the most beloved films of all time.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn
Rated PG

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 dark comedy directed by Stanley Kubrick. It follows the story of an unhinged United States Air Force General who, in a fit of mad paranoia, orders a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union. The President of the United States and his advisers must then race against time to prevent a nuclear holocaust. As the world is pushed to the brink of destruction, the madcap characters must confront the absurd logic of Cold War-era nuclear brinkmanship. Along the way, Dr. Strangelove, a wheelchair-bound nuclear scientist, provides a satirical commentary on the horrors of nuclear warfare. The film provides a humorous, yet sobering, look at the dangers of nuclear armament and the potential for global disaster.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

A Clockwork Orange
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee, Michael Bates, Warren Clarke
Rated R

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the 1962 novel of the same name by Anthony Burgess. The film follows the life of Alex, a charismatic and sociopathic delinquent who embarks on a violent crime spree alongside his gang of droogs. After he is arrested and sent to prison, Alex volunteers for an experimental procedure that involves him being brainwashed to become "good" and no longer capable of violence. Despite this, he soon finds himself in the same situations of violence and chaos that he was in before. The story follows his moral dilemma between good and evil, and his struggles with the corruption and hypocrisy of his society.

V for Vendetta (2005)

V for Vendetta
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From James McTeigue, starring Hugo Weaving, Natalie Portman, Rupert Graves, Stephen Rea
Rated R

V for Vendetta is a dystopian political thriller set in a future Britain, in which a freedom fighter known as "V" uses terrorist tactics to fight against a totalitarian regime. He wears a Guy Fawkes mask and inspires the people to rebel against the oppressive government. V for Vendetta follows his mission to bring about freedom and justice, while uncovering the true nature of the regime. Along the way, V must protect a young woman, Evey, from the secret police, while she helps him in his quest to bring down the government. The film is a powerful and thrilling tale of revolution, courage, and justice.

Spotlight (2015)

Spotlight
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Tom McCarthy, starring Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, Rachel McAdams, Liev Schreiber
Rated R

Spotlight is a 2015 American drama film directed by Tom McCarthy, starring Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, Rachel McAdams, John Slattery, Stanley Tucci, and Liev Schreiber. The film follows a team of investigative journalists from The Boston Globe who uncover a scandal of child molestation and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese, shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core. The reporters, known as the "Spotlight" team, must bring together a number of pieces of evidence to uncover the truth and bring those responsible to justice. Along the way, the team faces numerous obstacles, including a lack of resources and a powerful institution that seeks to protect its own. Despite the odds, the Spotlight team persists in its pursuit of truth and justice, eventually uncovering a massive and disturbing scandal. The film won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 2015, as well as Best Original Screenplay.

Gandhi (1982)

Gandhi
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Richard Attenborough, starring Ben Kingsley, John Gielgud, Rohini Hattangadi, Roshan Seth
Rated PG

Gandhi is a biographical epic about the life of Indian leader Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, who led India’s nonviolent resistance movement against British colonial rule in the early 20th century. The film is directed by Richard Attenborough and stars Ben Kingsley as Gandhi. The film chronicles Gandhi’s life from his early days as a lawyer in South Africa to his eventual rise to political power and the events that led to the independence of India. The film explores Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence and his lifelong fight for justice and peace. The film is an inspiring and powerful depiction of Gandhi’s life and legacy and is widely considered to be one of the best biopics ever made.

On the Waterfront (1954)

On the Waterfront
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Elia Kazan, starring Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger
Rated Approved

On the Waterfront is a 1954 crime drama directed by Elia Kazan and starring Marlon Brando. It follows the story of an ex-boxer, Terry Malloy, who is caught in the middle of a conflict between a local labor union and the Mob. Terry begins to take a stand against the corruption of the union and its crime boss, Johnny Friendly. As Terry faces threats and danger, he gains courage to expose the truth, becoming a hero in the process. This film is considered to be one of the greatest of all time, winning 8 Academy Awards, including Best Actor (Brando), Best Director, and Best Picture. It is a classic exploration of corruption, justice, and redemption.

Cool Hand Luke (1967)

Cool Hand Luke
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Stuart Rosenberg, starring Paul Newman, George Kennedy, Strother Martin, J.D. Cannon
Rated GP

Cool Hand Luke is a classic film directed by Stuart Rosenberg and starring Paul Newman. The film tells the story of Luke Jackson (Newman), a man who refuses to conform to the rules of a small-town Southern prison camp. His independent spirit and refusal to conform clashes with the camp warden and guards, leading to a series of conflicts and hardships. Despite the difficulties, Luke remains determined and is able to inspire the other inmates to unite together and escape from the camp. Along the way he also discovers the importance of friendship, loyalty, and personal freedom. Ultimately, the film is a powerful exploration of the human spirit and the lengths we will go to for justice and freedom.

Being There (1979)

Being There
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Hal Ashby, starring Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden
Rated PG

Being There is a 1979 comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby, starring Peter Sellers and Shirley MacLaine. The film follows the story of a simple-minded gardener, Chance (Sellers), whose life is turned upside down when he is mistakenly taken for a wise political advisor by a wealthy industrialist. Throughout the course of the film, Chance's simple philosophy of life is interpreted by others as profound wisdom, and he ultimately finds himself at the highest levels of American society. Although the film is based on a novel by Jerzy Kosinski, it is best remembered for Sellers' performance and for a famous closing line.

Papillon (1973)

Papillon
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Franklin J. Schaffner, starring Steve McQueen, Dustin Hoffman, Victor Jory, Don Gordon
Rated R

Papillon is a 1973 biographical prison drama film based on the best-selling autobiography of the same name written by French convict Henri Charrière. The film stars Steve McQueen as Henri "Papillon" Charrière and Dustin Hoffman as Louis Dega. The story follows Papillon's incarceration and subsequent escape from the French penal colony on Devil's Island, and his many subsequent attempts to escape captivity. Set in the 1930s, the film follows Papillon as he is unjustly convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment in a brutal penal colony in French Guiana, where he is determined to escape. With the help of Dega, he meets with resistance and makes several unsuccessful escape attempts, only to be recaptured and returned to the colony. Eventually, Papillon and Dega are able to make one last daring escape attempt. The film is a testament to the power of the human spirit and its ability to survive in the face of adversity.

All the President's Men (1976)

All the President's Men
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Alan J. Pakula, starring Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam
Rated PG

All the President's Men is a 1976 American political thriller directed by Alan J. Pakula. It is based on the 1974 non-fiction book of the same name by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, two reporters for The Washington Post. The film stars Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Woodward and Bernstein, respectively, who investigate a political scandal known as the Watergate scandal, which began with the 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The film chronicles the events leading up to the ultimate revelation that President Richard M. Nixon had a direct involvement in the burglary and consequent cover-up. The film follows Woodward and Bernstein as they search for the truth and attempt to uncover a web of political corruption and lies that leads all the way to the White House. It also examines the investigative journalism process, in which the two reporters slowly gain the trust of sources and slowly build a case against Nixon and his staff. The film culminates with Nixon's resignation from office and the public revelation of his involvement in the scandal. All the President's Men was critically acclaimed and won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

Frost/Nixon (2008)

Frost/Nixon
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Ron Howard, starring Frank Langella, Michael Sheen, Kevin Bacon, Sam Rockwell
Rated R

Frost/Nixon is a 2008 drama film directed by Ron Howard. Based on the play by Peter Morgan, the film centers on the historic 1977 television interviews between British television host David Frost and former President Richard Nixon. The interviews took place shortly after Nixon's resignation in the wake of the Watergate scandal. As Frost attempts to get Nixon to admit his guilt, the two engage in a battle of wits. The film explores the ethical and personal implications of the interviews and the impact they had on both Frost and Nixon. It stars Frank Langella as Nixon, Michael Sheen as Frost, and Kevin Bacon, Toby Jones, Sam Rockwell, and Oliver Platt in supporting roles. The film received critical acclaim, earning numerous nominations and awards including an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture.

Radio Days (1987)

Radio Days
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Woody Allen, starring Mia Farrow, Dianne Wiest, Mike Starr, Paul Herman
Rated PG

Easy Rider (1969)

Easy Rider
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Dennis Hopper, starring Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson, Antonio Mendoza
Rated R

Election (1999)

Election
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Alexander Payne, starring Matthew Broderick, Reese Witherspoon, Chris Klein, Jessica Campbell
Rated R

Lincoln (2012)

Lincoln
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn, Joseph Gordon-Levitt
Rated PG-13

Wag the Dog (1997)

Wag the Dog
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Barry Levinson, starring Dustin Hoffman, Robert De Niro, Anne Heche, Woody Harrelson
Rated R

 



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