Movies About D-Day Invasion

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Movies About D-Day Invasion

Ever viewed these Movies About D-Day Invasion? We bet you'll find some new films. Here are 25 of the best ones.

Schindler's List (1993)

Schindler's List
★★★★
★★★★
3.6 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Liam Neeson, Ralph Fiennes, Ben Kingsley, Caroline Goodall
Rated R

Schindler's List is a 1993 biographical drama directed by Steven Spielberg. Set during World War II, it tells the story of Oskar Schindler, a German industrialist who saves the lives of more than a thousand Polish-Jewish refugees by employing them in his factories. The film follows Schindler as he gradually comes to the realization that saving Jews is more important than making money. He ultimately sacrifices his wealth to save them from the Nazi concentration camps. The film is widely acclaimed for its historical accuracy and emotional power, and was nominated for twelve Academy Awards. It won seven, including Best Picture and Best Director.

Life Is Beautiful (1997)

Life Is Beautiful
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Roberto Benigni, starring Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta Braschi, Giorgio Cantarini, Giustino Durano
Rated PG-13

Life Is Beautiful is a 1997 Italian comedy-drama film directed by Roberto Benigni. It tells the story of Guido Orefice (Benigni), a Jewish Italian book shop owner, who must employ his fertile imagination to help his son, Giosuè (Giorgio Cantarini), survive the horrors of a Nazi concentration camp. Guido risks his own life in an attempt to protect his son and, through a series of hilarious antics, succeeds in making a game out of the situation. Together, they struggle to survive amidst the horror of war and the Holocaust. Through the power of love and imagination, Guido and Giosuè ultimately remain hopeful and faithful during their time in the concentration camp. Despite the dangers and tragedies of their situation, the film ultimately conveys a beautiful message of the power of human spirit.

The Pianist (2002)

The Pianist
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Roman Polanski, starring Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann, Frank Finlay, Emilia Fox
Rated R

The Pianist is a 2002 biographical drama film directed by Roman Polanski, based on the autobiography of the same name by Polish-Jewish pianist and composer, Władysław Szpilman. The film stars Adrien Brody as Szpilman and follows his struggle to survive the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto and the Holocaust during World War II. Through Szpilman's story, the film highlights the horrors of the war and his resilient spirit in the face of extreme adversity. Szpilman is eventually helped and sheltered by a German officer who recognizes his talent as a pianist. The film won the Palme d'Or at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, and Adrien Brody won the Academy Award for Best Actor, making him the youngest actor to ever win the award.

Casablanca (1942)

Casablanca
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Michael Curtiz, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains
Rated PG

Casablanca is a classic romantic drama set in the midst of World War II. Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) is a cynical American expatriate who runs a nightclub in the Moroccan city of Casablanca. He is approached by his former lover, Ilsa Lund (Ingrid Bergman), who is now married to freedom fighter Victor Laszlo. Laszlo is wanted by the Nazis, who are occupying the city, and Ilsa has come to Rick for help in getting him out of the country. Rick, who is in love with Ilsa, agrees to help her, but only on the condition that they part ways and never see each other again. With the help of his friend and former employee, Sam (Dooley Wilson), Rick manages to get Laszlo out of the city, while also reuniting Ilsa and her husband. In the end, Rick is left alone in the city, having made the ultimate sacrifice and given up his love for Ilsa in order to save her and her husband. Casablanca is an iconic film of the 1940s, with its memorable visual style, performances and dialogue. It is one of the most beloved films of all

Generation War (2013)

Generation War
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Stars: Volker Bruch, Tom Schilling, Katharina Schüttler, Miriam Stein, starring
Rated TV-MA

Generation War is a German drama about five young friends who are forced to face the brutal realities of World War II. It follows these five friends, Wilhelm, Friedhelm, Charlotte, Greta, and Viktor, as they are separated from each other while they are drafted into the German army. The story takes place between 1941 and 1945 and follows the characters as they experience the war in different ways. Wilhelm is a foot soldier in the Eastern Front, Friedhelm is a pilot in the air force, Charlotte is a nurse in a field hospital, Greta is an entertainer to the troops, and Viktor is a Jewish soldier in the Wehrmacht. The film portrays the struggles of the war and the horrors of the Holocaust as the characters try to stay alive and find a way to reunite against all odds.

The Boat (1981)

The Boat
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Wolfgang Petersen, starring Jürgen Prochnow, Herbert Grönemeyer, Klaus Wennemann, Hubertus Bengsch
Rated R

The Boat is a 1981 German drama film directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Set during World War II, the film centers on the crew of a German U-boat, captained by the aristocratic Werner (Jürgen Prochnow). Told from the viewpoint of the officers and seamen aboard the submarine, the movie follows their experiences on the high seas as they attempt to carry out their orders and survive. The crew is forced to deal with the harsh conditions of life aboard a submarine, the strain of long voyages, and the stress of combat and depth-charge attacks from Allied forces. At the same time, they must also contend with the inner turmoil between Werner and his executive officer, the cynical Chief Engineer (Herbert Grönemeyer). As the crew struggles to survive, they must ultimately decide whether to follow their orders or their conscience.

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

The Bridge on the River Kwai
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From David Lean, starring William Holden, Alec Guinness, Jack Hawkins, Sessue Hayakawa
Rated PG

The Bridge on the River Kwai is a 1957 British-American epic war film directed by David Lean, based on the novel by Pierre Boulle. In 1943, during World War II, a group of British prisoners of war, led by Colonel Nicholson (Alec Guinness), are sent to a Japanese prison camp in Burma and are forced to build a bridge over the River Kwai. Colonel Saito (Sessue Hayakawa) demands that the prisoners complete the bridge or face the death penalty. Nicholson refuses to compromise, despite the protests of some of his fellow prisoners. The prisoners eventually build the bridge, using their own ingenuity and resourcefulness. As the bridge nears completion and the Japanese prepare to use it to move supplies, Nicholson realizes the implications of what he has done. He decides to sabotage the bridge in an effort to prevent its use and keep the Japanese from advancing. With the help of a British commando team, led by Major Warden (Jack Hawkins), Nicholson succeeds in destroying the bridge. In the end, Nicholson and the other prisoners are released and Nicholson is recognized for his bravery and courage. The film won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

The Great Escape (1963)

The Great Escape
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From John Sturges, starring Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson
Rated Approved

The Great Escape is a classic 1963 war film directed by John Sturges. The film is based on the true story of a daring mass escape of British and Allied prisoners of war from a German POW camp during World War II. It stars Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, and Donald Pleasence. The story follows a group of prisoners of war who are determined to escape a Nazi prison camp by digging three tunnels. The prisoners must use their creativity and ingenuity to get around the complex network of security measures put in place by the German guards. With no other option, the prisoners take an incredible risk to make their way to freedom. As the prisoners make their escape, the Germans race to find them before it’s too late. With thrilling suspense, The Great Escape is a classic movie that has stood the test of time.

Army of Shadows (1969)

Army of Shadows
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Pierre Melville, starring Lino Ventura, Paul Meurisse, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Simone Signoret
Rated Not Rated

Army of Shadows is an acclaimed 1969 French film directed by Jean-Pierre Melville. It tells the story of a group of French Resistance fighters during World War II who must battle their way through Nazi-occupied France. The film follows the group's leader, Philippe Gerbier (played by Lino Ventura), as he leads his comrades in a desperate struggle against their oppressors. Along the way, the Resistance fighters face betrayal, capture, torture, and death. The film is a powerful and raw depiction of the French Resistance movement, and its themes of courage, loyalty, and the cost of freedom remain as relevant today as when it was first released.

The Imitation Game (2014)

The Imitation Game
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Morten Tyldum, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, Allen Leech
Rated PG-13

The Imitation Game is a historical drama film directed by Morten Tyldum and released in 2014. It stars Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing, a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and computer scientist who was credited with cracking the German Enigma Code during World War II. The film follows Turing as he leads a team of code-breakers at Bletchley Park to decipher the code, as well as his struggles with his own personal life, including his homosexuality and his relationship with his colleagues. Despite the challenges, Turing and his team eventually succeed in cracking the code, helping to bring a swift end to the war. The film was nominated for 8 Academy Awards, winning for Best Adapted Screenplay, and was a critical and commercial success.

Patton (1970)

Patton
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Franklin J. Schaffner, starring George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Stephen Young, Michael Strong
Rated GP

Patton is a 1970 biographical war film about the legendary U.S. Army General George S. Patton during World War II. Directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, the film stars George C. Scott in the title role. It covers Patton's career in North Africa, Sicily, and Europe during the Second World War, and culminates with his role in the Battle of the Bulge and his controversial condemnation by the Allies. The film follows Patton as he is a brilliant strategist and commander, but is often frustrated by his own ego, ambition, and immaturity. It also explores his relationship with his wife and his difficult relationship with his superior, General Dwight Eisenhower. The film was acclaimed by critics, and earned seven Oscars, including two for Scott and another for Best Picture.

Dunkirk (2017)

Dunkirk
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Fionn Whitehead, Barry Keoghan, Mark Rylance, Tom Hardy
Rated PG-13

Dunkirk is a 2017 war film written, co-produced, and directed by Christopher Nolan. Set during the World War II evacuation of Allied forces from the French city of Dunkirk, the film focuses on three different perspectives: the land, sea, and air. On land, a small group of British and French soldiers, led by a young private, struggle to survive on the beaches of Dunkirk while their enemies close in around them. On the sea, a civilian boat captained by an old mariner sails across the English Channel to rescue the stranded soldiers. In the air, a trio of RAF pilots battle the German forces as they attempt to provide cover for the evacuation. As the evacuation continues, the soldiers and civilians alike must grapple with the horrors of war and the courage of those who risk their lives for the sake of their country and for the hope of peace.

City of Life and Death (2009)

City of Life and Death
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Chuan Lu, starring Ye Liu, Wei Fan, Hideo Nakaizumi, Yuanyuan Gao
Rated R

City of Life and Death is a 2009 Chinese war drama film directed by Lu Chuan. It tells the story of the Battle of Nanjing, a three-month-long massacre of Chinese civilians and disarmed soldiers by imperial Japanese forces during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The film follows the lives of a handful of people, both Chinese and Japanese, during this catastrophic event. Through the alternating perspectives of both sides, the film examines the human cost of war and the moral ambiguity of combat. Ultimately, the film displays a message of love, peace, and humanity in the face of unspeakable violence.

Empire of the Sun (1987)

Empire of the Sun
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Steven Spielberg, starring Christian Bale, John Malkovich, Miranda Richardson, Nigel Havers
Rated PG

Empire of the Sun is a 1987 coming-of-age drama film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on J. G. Ballard's semi-autobiographical novel of the same name. Set during World War II, it follows the life of a wealthy English boy, Jamie Graham (Christian Bale) as he is separated from his parents in Shanghai and is eventually interned in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. Throughout his ordeal, Jamie develops a close bond with an American soldier, Basie (John Malkovich), who takes care of him and helps him survive the experience. The film is a powerful exploration of the human spirit in the face of adversity, as Jamie struggles to maintain his innocence and optimism as he matures in the harsh environment of the camp.

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (2008)

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Mark Herman, starring Asa Butterfield, David Thewlis, Rupert Friend, Zac Mattoon O'Brien
Rated PG-13

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is a 2008 British-American historical drama film set in World War II, based on John Boyne's 2006 novel of the same name. Directed by Mark Herman, the film tells the story of Bruno, the son of a Nazi commandant, who unknowingly befriends a Jewish concentration camp prisoner, Shmuel, through the fence of Auschwitz. As the boys become close, a series of events unfold, resulting in a powerful and shocking conclusion. The film explores themes of innocence, friendship, and the consequences of prejudice and racism.

Divided We Fall (2000)

Divided We Fall
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jan Hrebejk, starring Bolek Polívka, Csongor Kassai, Jaroslav Dusek, Anna Sisková
Rated PG-13

Divided We Fall is a 2000 Czech-language comedy-drama film directed by Jan Hrebejk. The film is set during World War II in German-occupied Czechoslovakia, and tells the story of Josef and Marie Cizek, a childless Czech couple whose lives are thrown into chaos when Josef's Jewish friend, David, is forced to hide in their home. Throughout the course of the film, the couple must find ways to protect David while avoiding detection by their Nazi occupiers. As their moral convictions are tested, they are forced to make difficult choices in order to survive. The film is a powerful exploration of the power of love, friendship, and courage in the face of adversity.

Europa Europa (1990)

Europa Europa
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Agnieszka Holland, starring Solomon Perel, Marco Hofschneider, René Hofschneider, André Wilms
Rated R

Europa Europa is a 1990 East German/Polish/French historical drama directed by Agnieszka Holland. It follows the story of Solomon Perel, a German-Jewish teenager who struggles to survive during the Second World War. Fleeing from the Nazis in Poland, he is separated from his family and forced to disguise himself as an ethnic German in order to avoid detection. He is ultimately sent to a Hitler Youth training camp, where he must continue to keep his identity a secret. Throughout the movie, Solomon must constantly balance between his Jewish identity and his need to survive. Despite the dangerous position he finds himself in, Solomon is able to make use of his skills and use his charm to survive the war. Ultimately, the film serves to highlight the plight of the Jews during World War II, and the courage of those who endured it.

Enemy at the Gates (2001)

Enemy at the Gates
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Jean-Jacques Annaud, starring Jude Law, Ed Harris, Joseph Fiennes, Rachel Weisz
Rated R

Enemy at the Gates is a World War II drama set during the Battle of Stalingrad in 1942. The film follows two Russian snipers, Vassili Zaitsev (Jude Law) and Danilov (Joseph Fiennes), who are both vying for the attention of Tania (Rachel Weisz). Vassili is a celebrated war hero with a natural talent for shooting, while Danilov is a political officer who uses propaganda to boost morale. They soon become embroiled in an intense rivalry when a German sniper, Major Konig (Ed Harris), is sent to Stalingrad to eliminate Vassili. Tania, who falls in love with Vassili, helps him survive Konig's attack. In the end, Vassili and Danilov ultimately bond over their shared love of Tania, and Vassili ultimately defeats Konig in a thrilling sniper duel.

The Thin Red Line (1998)

The Thin Red Line
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Terrence Malick, starring Jim Caviezel, Sean Penn, Nick Nolte, Kirk Acevedo
Rated R

The Thin Red Line is a war drama directed by Terrence Malick in 1998 set during World War II. The story follows a group of U.S. soldiers from the fictional C-for-Charlie infantry company as they fight their way through the Battle of Guadalcanal. Led by Captain Staros (played by Nick Nolte), the C-for-Charlie company is faced with a moral quandary when they are ordered to take a strategically important hill from the Japanese forces occupying the island. Staros and his men must grapple with their sense of duty and responsibility to the army, their loyalty to the nation, their compassion for the enemy, and their own personal survival. Through their struggle, the characters are forced to confront the mental and physical costs of war. The Thin Red Line is an exploration of the human condition during war, and the weight of guilt, regret, sorrow, and faith that come with it.

Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005)

Sophie Scholl: The Final Days
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Marc Rothemund, starring Julia Jentsch, Fabian Hinrichs, Alexander Held, Johanna Gastdorf
Rated Not Rated

Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005) is a German historical drama film directed by Marc Rothemund and written by Fred Breinersdorfer. It chronicles the last days of Sophie Scholl, a 21-year-old member of the anti-Nazi non-violent student resistance group The White Rose. After being arrested for distributing anti-war leaflets at her university in Munich, Sophie and her brother Hans are interrogated by the Gestapo, who are determined to get a confession from her. Through a series of intense interrogations, Sophie remains brave and defiant in the face of certain death. Despite the danger, she still refuses to give in and continues to profess her beliefs. In the end, Sophie and Hans are sentenced to death and executed by guillotine. The film is based on the true story of Sophie Scholl and is a powerful reminder of the courage and strength in the face of tyranny.

The Flowers of War (2011)

The Flowers of War
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Yimou Zhang, starring Christian Bale, Ni Ni, Xinyi Zhang, Tianyuan Huang
Rated R

The Flowers of War is a 2011 Chinese historical drama directed by Yimou Zhang. The film is set during the 1937 Japanese invasion of Nanking, and follows a group of desperate civilians who take refuge in a Catholic Church. A mortician, John Miller (Christian Bale), is mistaken for a priest and reluctantly takes charge of the church, where he and the students of a Catholic school eventually face the horrors of war. With courage and compassion, John devotes himself to protecting the civilian refugees and trying to save them from the invading armies. Along the way, he finds redemption through his newfound courage and selflessness.

The Book Thief (2013)

The Book Thief
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Brian Percival, starring Sophie Nélisse, Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, Ben Schnetzer
Rated PG-13

The Book Thief is a drama that follows the life of a young girl, Liesel Meminger, during World War II in Nazi Germany. After her mother is taken away to a concentration camp, Liesel is sent to live with the Hubermanns, a kindly foster family in the small village of Molching. Despite the harsh Nazi regime, Liesel finds solace in books and stories that she steals from the local book burnings. With the help of her newfound friend Rudy and her foster father, Hans, Liesel learns to read and discovers the power of words. As her life is threatened by the war, Liesel's courage and resilience will be tested as she searches for hope in the darkest of times.

The Counterfeiters (2007)

The Counterfeiters
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stefan Ruzowitzky, starring Karl Markovics, August Diehl, Devid Striesow, Martin Brambach
Rated R

The Counterfeiters is a 2007 Austrian-German biographical drama film directed by Stefan Ruzowitzky. The film tells the story of a group of concentration camp prisoners who are recruited by the Nazi's to produce fake foreign currency. Salomon Sorowitsch (Karl Markovics) is the leader of the counterfeiting team, who is forced to work to the orders of the Nazi's. With the assistance of a Jewish accountant and a French counterfeiter, the team works to produce British and American money in order to destabilize the Allies' economies. As the team's success grows, so does the danger for their lives, as the Nazi's will stop at nothing to make sure their mission is accomplished. In the end, Salomon must find a way to use his skills to survive and eventually outsmart the Nazi's.

Elle s'appelait Sarah (2010)

Elle s'appelait Sarah
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Gilles Paquet-Brenner, starring Kristin Scott Thomas, Mélusine Mayance, Niels Arestrup, Frédéric Pierrot
Rated PG-13

Elle s'appelait Sarah (She Was Called Sarah) is a French film directed by Gilles Paquet-Brenner in 2010. It is a drama set during the German occupation of France during World War II. The story follows a young Jewish girl named Sarah Starzynski as she and her family attempt to survive the dangers of Nazi-occupied France during the Holocaust. With the help of their brave neighbor, Julien, Sarah and her family manage to avoid capture by the Nazis. However, Sarah is eventually taken away to the Auschwitz concentration camp. In the present day, an elderly journalist named Julia Jarmond is assigned to write an article about the Vel' d'Hiv roundup, a raid conducted by the French police in 1942 which resulted in the arrest and deportation of thousands of Jewish people. Julia discovers Sarah's story as she researches for her article and is inspired to find out the truth about what happened to Sarah and her family. Through the course of her investigation, Julia is able to uncover the heartbreaking story of Sarah and her family and is determined to honor their memory. Elle s'appelait Sarah is a powerful story of courage and strength in the face of tragedy.

The Guns of Navarone (1961)

The Guns of Navarone
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From J. Lee Thompson, starring David Niven, Gregory Peck, Anthony Quinn, Anthony Quayle
Rated Not Rated

The Guns of Navarone is a classic World War II action-adventure film directed by J. Lee Thompson and starring Gregory Peck, David Niven, and Anthony Quinn. Set in the Mediterranean during 1943, the film follows a team of Allied commandos tasked with destroying two massive German guns on the fictional island of Navarone. The team, led by Peck's character, Major Keith Mallory, must battle both the guns and the relentless German forces surrounding them. With the help of a Greek resistance fighter and a British spy, Mallory and his team must use all of their ingenuity and strength to overcome the odds and succeed in their mission. Filled with thrilling action sequences, amazing stunts, and a memorable musical score, The Guns of Navarone is an exciting and memorable classic.

 



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