Voyeurism Movies

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Voyeurism Movies

Dozens of films have talked about Voyeurism Movies. We assembled 25 of the top ones.

Rear Window (1954)

Rear Window
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter
Rated PG

Rear Window is a classic 1954 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It stars James Stewart as photographer L.B. Jefferies, who is confined to a wheelchair in his apartment with a broken leg. While being immobilized, Jefferies begins to observe the lives of his neighbors through his rear window. Eventually, he begins to suspect one of his neighbors, Lars Thorwald (played by Raymond Burr), of murder when he sees Thorwald disposing of suspicious items. Jefferies enlists the help of his girlfriend Lisa (played by Grace Kelly) to investigate Thorwald, leading to a gripping and suspenseful climax.

Psycho (1960)

Psycho
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin
Rated R

Psycho is a classic psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It tells the story of Marion Crane, a young woman who embezzles money from her employer and takes a trip to the Bates Motel. Here she meets the strange proprietor Norman Bates, whose dark and mysterious past slowly unravels while Marion is forced to confront her own personal demons. The film is renowned for its iconic shower scene and its exploration of themes such as voyeurism, guilt, and repression. Psycho is widely considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest works, as well as one of the most influential horror films of all time.

American Beauty (1999)

American Beauty
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Sam Mendes, starring Kevin Spacey, Annette Bening, Thora Birch, Wes Bentley
Rated R

American Beauty is a 1999 American drama film written by Alan Ball and directed by Sam Mendes. The movie tells the story of Lester Burnham, a middle-aged advertising executive who is going through a mid-life crisis. After getting fired from his job and finding out his wife is having an affair, Lester begins to explore his own desires and begins an affair with a teenage neighbor. He also develops a new appreciation for life, embracing beauty and seeking out the joys of his final days. Along the way, the film explores themes of love, death, and beauty in the American suburban life. The film stars Kevin Spacey, Annette Bening, Thora Birch, Mena Suvari, Wes Bentley, Allison Janney, Peter Gallagher, and Chris Cooper.

The Lives of Others (2006)

The Lives of Others
★★★★
★★★★
3.4 out of 4 stars

From Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, starring Ulrich Mühe, Martina Gedeck, Sebastian Koch, Ulrich Tukur
Rated R

The Lives of Others is a 2006 German-language drama film written and directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. The movie follows a Stasi captain who, tasked with spying on a playwright and his girlfriend in East Berlin, discovers the power of literature and the importance of freedom. As the captain's professional and personal lives become intertwined, he becomes increasingly sympathetic to the couple and begins to question the oppressive system he serves. In the end, the playwright is able to get his work published in the West, and the captain's honor is restored. Through this story, the movie explores the harshness of life in East Germany and the importance of individual freedom.

Vertigo (1958)

Vertigo
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Alfred Hitchcock, starring James Stewart, Kim Novak, Barbara Bel Geddes, Tom Helmore
Rated PG

Vertigo is a 1958 American psychological thriller film produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The story follows Scottie Ferguson (James Stewart), an acrophobic detective, who is hired to follow the mysterious and troubled Madeleine Elster (Kim Novak). As Scottie is drawn into a web of obsession and deceit, he begins to unravel the truth behind Madeleine's strange behavior, which ultimately leads to his own paranoia and fear. The film is renowned for its complex narrative structure, intricate camera movements and iconic dreamlike finale.

The Truman Show (1998)

The Truman Show
★★★★
★★★★
3.3 out of 4 stars

From Peter Weir, starring Jim Carrey, Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich
Rated PG

The Truman Show is a 1998 comedy-drama film directed by Peter Weir and starring Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank, a man who has been unknowingly living in a constructed reality television show. The film follows Truman's awakening to the fact that his entire life has been the subject of a 24-hour-a-day reality show broadcast worldwide, and his attempt to escape from the artificial world of the show. Along the way he must contend with the show's producer Christof, who is determined to keep Truman in the show, as well as his friends and family who have been actors in the show for years. The film explores themes of contact with reality, freedom of choice, and the search for true happiness.

Wings of Desire (1987)

Wings of Desire
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Wim Wenders, starring Bruno Ganz, Solveig Dommartin, Otto Sander, Curt Bois
Rated PG-13

Wings of Desire is a 1987 drama directed by Wim Wenders and starring Bruno Ganz, Solveig Dommartin, Otto Sander, Curt Bois, and Peter Falk. The film follows two angels, Damiel (Ganz) and Cassiel (Sander) who wander Berlin, observing the lives of its residents and providing comfort where they can. Damiel falls in love with a trapeze artist and struggles with a desire to become human so he can experience life and love. Eventually, he makes the decision to become human, leaving his angelic existence and beginning a life with the woman he loves. The film won the 1988 Cannes Film Festival Palme d’Or, and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.

Love Exposure (2008)

Love Exposure
★★★★
★★★★
3.2 out of 4 stars

From Sion Sono, starring Takahiro Nishijima, Hikari Mitsushima, Sakura Andô, Yutaka Shimizu
Rated Unrated

Love Exposure is a 2008 Japanese romantic comedy-drama film directed by Sion Sono and starring Takahiro Nishijima, Hikari Mitsushima, Sakura Ando and Chika Uchida. Set in Tokyo, the film follows Yu, a young Catholic boy who is searching for true love in a world of sin and debauchery. After he is abandoned by his father, Yu discovers a form of mortification of the flesh that allows him to focus his energy on achieving a higher state of understanding and love. In his search for true love, Yu becomes a master at taking up-skirt photos of unsuspecting women, which leads him into a world of conflict and chaos. His obsession with his father's mistress and an attractive schoolgirl further complicates his journey to finding real love. With an unconventional narrative structure, Love Exposure is an exploration of faith, identity and the power of love.

The Conversation (1974)

The Conversation
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Francis Ford Coppola, starring Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Frederic Forrest
Rated PG

The Conversation is a psychological thriller directed by Francis Ford Coppola. It follows Harry Caul (Gene Hackman), a surveillance expert who is hired to record a conversation between two people. As Caul listens to the conversation, he starts to become paranoid and believes that he is being followed and monitored himself. In the end, Caul realizes that his paranoia was justified and he is indeed being spied on. The film examines the themes of privacy, trust, and paranoia in a world where surveillance and technology are advancing.

Being John Malkovich (1999)

Being John Malkovich
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From Spike Jonze, starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener, John Malkovich
Rated R

Being John Malkovich is a surrealistic dark comedy film directed by Spike Jonze and written by Charlie Kaufman. The film follows Craig Schwartz, an unemployed puppeteer who stumbles upon a mysterious portal that leads into the mind of the famous actor, John Malkovich. Upon discovering the portal, Craig and his co-worker Maxine take advantage of it, charging people for the chance to be inside Malkovich's mind for fifteen minutes. As the portal grows in popularity, Craig and Maxine's lives become increasingly intertwined with Malkovich's as they struggle to keep control of the portal and their own lives. Meanwhile, Malkovich is unaware of the portal, unaware of what is happening in his own mind.

Blue Velvet (1986)

Blue Velvet
★★★★
★★★★
3.1 out of 4 stars

From David Lynch, starring Isabella Rossellini, Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Laura Dern
Rated R

Blue Velvet is a 1986 neo-noir psychological thriller film directed by David Lynch, starring Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper, and Laura Dern. The plot follows a young man (MacLachlan) who discovers a mysterious and disturbing object, which leads him down a labyrinthine path of corruption and depravity in a small American town. As he dives deeper into the underbelly of the town, he discovers a dark secret involving a deranged criminal (Hopper) and a beautiful lounge singer (Rossellini). The film's dreamlike scenes and darkly humorous dialogue further contribute to its captivating and surreal atmosphere. Blue Velvet is often cited as one of Lynch's best films, and is widely considered to be one of the most influential films of the 1980s.

Blow-Up (1966)

Blow-Up
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Michelangelo Antonioni, starring David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles, John Castle
Rated Not Rated

Blow-Up is a 1966 British-Italian psychological thriller directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. The film follows a London fashion photographer, Thomas (David Hemmings), who believes he has unwittingly captured a murder on film. After developing the film, Thomas discovers a hidden body in the background of the shots. The film follows Thomas as he attempts to unravel the mystery of the murder and its implications for his own life. As Thomas continues to pursue the truth, the film examines themes of photography, reality, and perception. The film also features a now iconic scene in which Thomas dances to the song "The Yardbirds." Blow-Up won the Palme d'Or at the 1967 Cannes Film Festival and is considered an important work of the 1960s art house film movement.

Following (1998)

Following
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Christopher Nolan, starring Jeremy Theobald, Alex Haw, Lucy Russell, John Nolan
Rated R

Following is a 1998 independent neo-noir thriller written and directed by Christopher Nolan. The story follows a young writer who follows strangers around the streets of London, hoping to find inspiration for his novel. After meeting a thief who takes him under his wing, he soon finds himself in over his head as the criminal underworld begins to close in on him. With its strong visual style and clever dialog, Following is an inventive and engrossing exploration of chance and fate.

Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Eyes Wide Shut
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Stanley Kubrick, starring Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Todd Field, Sydney Pollack
Rated R

Eyes Wide Shut is a psychological drama film directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. The story follows Dr. Bill Harford, a successful Manhattan doctor whose seemingly perfect life is thrown into chaos when his wife, Alice, reveals that she has contemplated cheating on him. After being encouraged to explore his own desires, Bill embarks on a night-long odyssey, during which he encounters a slew of bizarre encounters, including a secret sex club, a prostitute, and a mysterious figure who is trying to protect him from danger. As the night progresses, Bill starts to doubt the very foundation of his life, forcing him to confront his darkest fears. In the end, Bill must decide what is most important to him and ultimately regain his faith in his marriage and himself.

Blow Out (1981)

Blow Out
★★★★
★★★★
3 out of 4 stars

From Brian De Palma, starring John Travolta, Nancy Allen, John Lithgow, Dennis Franz
Rated R

Caché (Hidden) (2005)

Caché (Hidden)
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Michael Haneke, starring Daniel Auteuil, Juliette Binoche, Maurice Bénichou, Annie Girardot
Rated R

Sex, Lies, and Videotape (1989)

Sex, Lies, and Videotape
★★★★
★★★★
2.9 out of 4 stars

From Steven Soderbergh, starring James Spader, Andie MacDowell, Peter Gallagher, Laura San Giacomo
Rated R

Klute (1971)

Klute
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Alan J. Pakula, starring Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Charles Cioffi, Roy Scheider
Rated R

1984 (1984)

1984
★★★★
★★★★
2.8 out of 4 stars

From Michael Radford, starring John Hurt, Richard Burton, Suzanna Hamilton, Cyril Cusack
Rated R

Body Double (1984)

Body Double
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From Brian De Palma, starring Craig Wasson, Melanie Griffith, Gregg Henry, Deborah Shelton
Rated R

The 'Burbs (1989)

The 'Burbs
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From Joe Dante, starring Tom Hanks, Bruce Dern, Carrie Fisher, Corey Feldman
Rated PG

One Hour Photo (2002)

One Hour Photo
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From Mark Romanek, starring Robin Williams, Connie Nielsen, Michael Vartan, Dylan Smith
Rated R

Red Road (2006)

Red Road
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From Andrea Arnold, starring Kate Dickie, Tony Curran, Martin Compston, Natalie Press
Rated Not Rated

Disturbia (2007)

Disturbia
★★★★
★★★★
2.7 out of 4 stars

From D.J. Caruso, starring Shia LaBeouf, David Morse, Carrie-Anne Moss, Sarah Roemer
Rated PG-13

Blue Thunder (1983)

Blue Thunder
★★★★
★★★★
2.6 out of 4 stars

From John Badham, starring Roy Scheider, Warren Oates, Candy Clark, Daniel Stern
Rated R

 



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